Mosin Nagant stock project - Page 2
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Old 01-04-2014, 02:56 AM   #11
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Beautiful job man I'm working on a nagant m44 myself I used sand paper, started with a heavy grit to remove the surface then went finer. After I hit it with the steel wool. So far so good, I'm planing on staining it a charcoal tone not original I know but I think it will look cool. Thanks for sharing. And again that's beautiful work.
Thank you!
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Old 01-11-2014, 02:24 PM   #12
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Looks good. I've had a number of these fine firearms come across my bench over the years. My favorite is a 1942 Izhevsk 91/30. It has many rough machined parts and machine marks...it's far from pretty, but still one heck of a rifle. It has a beech stock that I stripped and smoothed, leaving armory marks and oil stained areas intact. Most of those stains are in the wrist area, showing how often it was handled I was unable to get the stock to accept the Sedona Red stain I bought. In the end, I finished mine off with Tung Oil and called it a day.

Yours came out really nice looking...good job!

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Old 01-11-2014, 03:22 PM   #13
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Looks good. I've had a number of these fine firearms come across my bench over the years. My favorite is a 1942 Izhevsk 91/30. It has many rough machined parts and machine marks...it's far from pretty, but still one heck of a rifle. It has a beech stock that I stripped and smoothed, leaving armory marks and oil stained areas intact. Most of those stains are in the wrist area, showing how often it was handled I was unable to get the stock to accept the Sedona Red stain I bought. In the end, I finished mine off with Tung Oil and called it a day.

Yours came out really nice looking...good job!
Thanks! I used a lot of mineral spirits after stripping per the suggestion of the 'old guy' at the local hardware store, I think that helped the wood accept the stain. Also these were not all made from the sane wood. The lighter colored one was spruce I believe
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Old 01-11-2014, 03:26 PM   #14
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The 91/30 is finished with shellac. To get the original finish use amber shellac as a sanding sealer. Stain the stock with red mahogany. Then give the stock as many coats of amber shellac as you like. The nice thing about shellac is it is very easy to repair. Use a rag with a fine texture such as an old sheet. Dampen the rag with denatured alcohol. Place the rag on the damaged area until the shellac is "soft." Then use the rag to gently push the shellac into the damaged area. Allow the stock a couple hours to dry. I have used this technique to repair antique furniture I bought at auction for pennies on the dollar. After the repair I have run furniture back through the same auction house for a healthy profit.

Don't use paint thinner to clean your tools or to wipe the dust off a surface you are going to finish with shellac. Use denatured alcohol to clean up your tools or prepare the surface for a coat of shellac.

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Old 01-11-2014, 05:14 PM   #15
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The 91/30 is finished with shellac. To get the original finish use amber shellac as a sanding sealer. Stain the stock with red mahogany. Then give the stock as many coats of amber shellac as you like. The nice thing about shellac is it is very easy to repair. Use a rag with a fine texture such as an old sheet. Dampen the rag with denatured alcohol. Place the rag on the damaged area until the shellac is "soft." Then use the rag to gently push the shellac into the damaged area. Allow the stock a couple hours to dry. I have used this technique to repair antique furniture I bought at auction for pennies on the dollar. After the repair I have run furniture back through the same auction house for a healthy profit.

Don't use paint thinner to clean your tools or to wipe the dust off a surface you are going to finish with shellac. Use denatured alcohol to clean up your tools or prepare the surface for a coat of shellac.
Is the shellac okay for in-house furniture? I have some that could use restoration. Is it clear by itself or has an amber color?
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Old 01-11-2014, 06:59 PM   #16
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Is the shellac okay for in-house furniture? I have some that could use restoration. Is it clear by itself or has an amber color?
There is clear shellac but it is not truly clear. I prefer amber shellac for that reason. If you do a little research on shellac you will see the main ingredient is crushed beetles. Given that the main ingredient is a crushed bug it's easy to see why I say that there is no truly clear shellac.
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Old 01-11-2014, 08:11 PM   #17
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Nice job. After stripping the stock some of the small dings/dents can be removed with a good steam iron, cloth and patience.

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