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Old 10-08-2011, 06:55 PM   #661
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I clean mine when they quit working as I expect them to work. Some I've shot thousands of rounds through and still have not cleaned them.

When they do fall below my expectations, I strip them down and flood them with solvent plus air-pressure & brush where possible, blow dry, oil and re-assemble.

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Old 10-08-2011, 07:00 PM   #662
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I clean after every range session, mainly because I use my CCW for at least 50 rounds at every session and I am at the range at least once a week. For the Ruger MK II, it will get a bore cleaning only after every session until it qualifies as filthy because reassembly involves LOTS of bad language on my part.

My O/U shotguns get bore-snaked after every outing (I reload with Clays so its real clean). I seldom shot my rifles since I quit hunting, so they are pulled out every 6 months, cleaned and a light coat of oil left in the bore (just an oiled patch, I want light, not drippy).

My CCW is cleaned with with M-Pro 7. No smell, non-flammable and works well. I spray the bore and let it sit for a few minutes, run a brush through a few times to finish loosening copper fouling and then take a patch and jag through until the patches are clean coming out. Receiver is dry brushed, magazines are taken apart and interior brushed out. The mag spring is wiped with a barely oily patch and the mag is reassembled.
The interior of the receiver is wiped down with a patch sprayed with M-Pro 7 until the patches are clean.
The slide is lubed with a small quantity of Snake Oil grease, I'm talking less than a small pin-head worth of grease per side, it spreads and works that well. The recoil spring, after cleaning is wiped down with a patch that has Snake Oil gun oil on it, a little goes a long way. The exterior of the barrel gets a wipe down with Snake Oil grease, just enough that if you touch it, it leaves a SLIGHT fingerprint behind. A Gunny I used to shoot with once told me if it has "wear polish" on it, wipe it with an oiled patch that leaves just a trace of lube behind.

My revolvers get similar treatment but the only lube I use on them is the Snake Oil gun oil.

I have no financial ties to these products. I use Snake Oil because it doesn't get effected by any temperture I have shot in: I lived in New Hampshire and shot in winter leagues in all temps outdoors and now I live in the greater Phoenix area and higher temps don't bother it either. Just what works for me.

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Old 10-08-2011, 07:36 PM   #663
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I never wait more than a day after shooting anything.

I tend to use a few different things rather than just one product. In looking into some studies on rust prevention and protection I saw some products had different characteristics. So, one time I may use EEZoX next time Weapon Shield and the next M-Pro7. My way of thinking is that I will have all of the best stuff on my guns one time or another, and they all are good.

For slides I use several as well, TW25, Tetra Gun Grease, and Slide Glide (temp for the season). Aside from the old patches routing, the bore snake and tooth brushes, and apply stuff in places with a syringe, tooth pick or little make up brushes like my wife uses. They come in a little book like paper matches come in, and can hold a very small amount of oil or grease or a lot of it.

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Old 10-08-2011, 08:21 PM   #664
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I clean after every trip to the range or firing, and once quarterly do a field stripping.
Hoppes #9, Breakfree CLP,and for my Glocks I use Pro-Gold lubricant. Pro-Gold has the slides of my Glocks smoother and quieter than anything else I have tried.

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Old 10-08-2011, 11:50 PM   #665
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Originally Posted by dailygundeals View Post
We live at the beach in Southern CA so all the guns are cleaned and oiled with every use and then used or not they are inspected and rubbed down with a lightly oiled cloth on the 1st of every month.
I attended the Forcecom Matches every year at FT. Ord in California and I remember how our guns looked after a match or even the next morning if we didn't lock them in their cases. That fine sand that blows everywhere and the salt tasting moisture and fog, you better believe we cleaned our guns several times a day. I loved those trips out there and especially Monterey and the Cannery Row. Some fine restaurants and we hit every one during our 2 week stay there. I miss it now that I am retired from the Army.
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Old 10-09-2011, 12:08 AM   #666
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Originally Posted by Ram Rod View Post
Gun cleaning. Quite the subject, and as diverse as the membership here. For the novice firearms owner it's obviously going to be different since this group will be learning from others and taking advice. For the seasoned firearms enthusiast, it's a well learned and practiced experience put to work at maintaining the best tools one has for each particular purpose. Varied gun cleaning habits usually form with the way the tools are used. They are also formed by the person and to what extent they wish to care for their chosen tools. The yearly hunter will be at one end of the spectrum, and the weekly match shooter will be at the other. Those who need to keep busy and have some sort of obsessive-compulsive disorder we shouldn't include because they are a group by themselves.
My background in short would be growing up at an early age around and with firearms, military service, avid shooter, reloader, occasional hunter large and small game, USPSA member and three years consistently shooting matches twice a month. My range officer certification and Glock certified armorer status, gunsmith, and former full service gun shop owner make little difference.
Over the past 26 or so years of my firearms ownership and deployment of my tools for many venues, I had amassed a whole cabinet full of firearms cleaning agents and concoctions to where it seemed each and every individual firearm that I owned had a particular recipe. Sometimes I'm not sure whether getting up in years or gaining experience tends to lead us to working smarter instead of harder. Either way, I'm not here to dispel any myths nor give away any secrets or unknown facts. Best thing to do is to take care of your firearms if you own them, and to prolong their life as much as possible. After all.....to me it's like preserving this country and it's heritage as well as the constitution. It's also getting the most out of one's investment. That may be a smaller amount now compared to the past as manufacturers try to compete in a global, downward spiraling economy, but sooner or later, we should get off the 'disposable' ideals that seem to be so prominent these days. Taking care of what you have is more important now than ever. Just like your vehicle. If you depend on it...take care of it. Just because the car manufacturer says change oil every 3k miles that doesn't mean you have to. Judge according to usage and the product. Use other (better than recommended) fluids and products in your vehicle and you may end up taking care of it better than what the manufacturer recommends. After all........the manufacturer wants to sell something, and more of it at the same time. They may also own a part of the oil company. Not necessarily a conflict of interest, more like an interest in raising conflict. Follow me?
Brands and types of firearms may also play an important role when it comes to end user care and what is necessary. Only the owner knows best, how the tools are used, and what affects them. Dirt roads with a '79 Chevy, mudding with a Dodge 4x4, or touring the country in a Chrysler, maybe towing a 5th wheel travel trailer with a Ford. Your choice in firearms should be just like your choice in vehicles....for the purpose. Then be willing to maintain according to usage. Therefore, I can't honestly lay down any suggested or firm regimen for taking the best care of your firearm. Only you can do that.
There are two things that I do firmly believe in for any firearm/owner.
A) NO RUST...never let it get started.
B) Over-cleaning can take as much toll as neglect in most cases.
I won't give any plugs for manufacturers. I've had almost all of them at one time or another except for S&W. I will give one plug for Gunzilla, and that it's made my life a whole lot easier, and cut my cleaning times down to the bone. It's become just about my only choice for most everything. I don't have any trade secrets nor standards for you to follow specifically in your firearms cleaning and care. If I did, that would be like the government telling you what you can, and cannot do and how to do it when you do. One of those things where you know best, and if you don't know now...it will come in time. So long as you can sleep at night without hearing your guns rust, your okay. So long as you know you can pull any tool out of the box and depend on it without a doubt for the job at hand.....you're doing fine. Keep up the good work.
Ramrod I think you covered just about everything. I am going to go outside right now and clean my 5 classic cars. LOL I do agree with your statements.
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Old 10-09-2011, 12:11 AM   #667
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Originally Posted by RTHOMAS View Post
I always clean from the breech. As far as the aluminum rod vs steel, never had a nylon or vinyl covered rod leave plastic fouling as I always use a bore guide. The rod never touches the bore. I use to use aluminum multipiece rods, but have had most break or get loose over the years. I still have a few and use one on my old Marlin Glenfield 22 rifle from time to time, but for my other hunting rifles which I may have spent way too much for I would rather not use a multipiece rod. The bore guide I use also prevents chemicals from entering any place but the bore.

By the way one thing I failed to mention was my method of placing a thin film of oil on the portion of the rifle barrel hidden by the stock if the barrel isnt being removed. Since all my rifle barrels are floating slightly off the stock, I have found that a lint-free Kimwipe tissue used for cleaning lenses when coated with oil is thin enough and strong enough that it can be slid between the barrel and the stock. Using it much like you would buff shoes will apply a very thin coat of oil in those hidden areas in between barrel removals. I can on most of my guns cover all but a small area near the recoil lug, and I have never had a kimwipe tear and get lost doing this.
Hummm now that is a good tip. I am guilty of not cleaning under the forearm for many years. But now it sounds easy. Most of my rifles are full floaters too.
Thanks, Sarge
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Old 10-09-2011, 12:18 AM   #668
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Originally Posted by eldarbeast View Post
I practise every three weeks, rotating through my long and short arms and 2-3 times a month with my shotgun at the skeet range. After thoroughly cleaning the weapons with Hoppe's products, I use bacon grease to lubricate the firearms for the next time. This keeps the rust monsters away and leaves them smelling fresh and inviting. It also helps me to keep my eye on the sights better.

eldarbeast
You use BACON GREASE? Bacon is cured with salt. I would never use bacon grease on anything metal. And I really doubt my wife would like our bedroom closet smelling like bacon grease.
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Old 10-09-2011, 06:50 AM   #669
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There are reasons why the military insists on cleaning a gun.
1) They still "remember" black powder and corrosive primers
2) They love to have you strip-and-reassemble
3) They didn't pay for the guns and they don't care if they wear out or get damaged from frequent disassembly
4) Just like they love to have you fill sand bags and move them around.
Call Baer or Wilson and see how often they recommend you clean or disassembly one of their guns (or better, try to determine how often they do it to their personal guns).
Rust is the big factor. Wipe off hand prints and store in low humidity.
PS: apparently the Berettas are just too complicated for the recruits, so they Army wants to replace them with simpler DAO guns, something with a LONG trigger pull.

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Old 10-09-2011, 10:20 AM   #670
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noylj View Post
There are reasons why the military insists on cleaning a gun.
1) They still "remember" black powder and corrosive primers
2) They love to have you strip-and-reassemble
3) They didn't pay for the guns and they don't care if they wear out or get damaged from frequent disassembly

and they want you to understand that your rifle may be the only thing that stands between you and death.

4) Just like they love to have you fill sand bags and move them around.
Call Baer or Wilson and see how often they recommend you clean or disassembly one of their guns (or better, try to determine how often they do it to their personal guns).
Rust is the big factor. Wipe off hand prints and store in low humidity.
PS: apparently the Berettas are just too complicated for the recruits, so they Army wants to replace them with simpler DAO guns, something with a LONG trigger pull.
Fixed that for ya..... and don't ever change the oil in your $30,000 vehicle, don't brush your teeth, after all preventive maintenance is all hype. Best of luck with yer point of view.
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