Gun Cleaning Input - Page 57
Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > Gunsmithing & Do-It-Yourself Projects > DIY Projects > Gun Cleaning Input

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-04-2011, 10:21 PM   #561
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
manyguns's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 10
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default clean gun

i clean my guns after use and when[daughters boyfriend visits] just kidding no kids i have been using safariland breakfree to clean and lubricate thanks for asking

__________________
manyguns is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2011, 10:36 PM   #562
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Fayetteville,Arkansas
Posts: 414
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts

Default

Gun cleaning. Quite the subject, and as diverse as the membership here. For the novice firearms owner it's obviously going to be different since this group will be learning from others and taking advice. For the seasoned firearms enthusiast, it's a well learned and practiced experience put to work at maintaining the best tools one has for each particular purpose. Varied gun cleaning habits usually form with the way the tools are used. They are also formed by the person and to what extent they wish to care for their chosen tools. The yearly hunter will be at one end of the spectrum, and the weekly match shooter will be at the other. Those who need to keep busy and have some sort of obsessive-compulsive disorder we shouldn't include because they are a group by themselves.
My background in short would be growing up at an early age around and with firearms, military service, avid shooter, reloader, occasional hunter large and small game, USPSA member and three years consistently shooting matches twice a month. My range officer certification and Glock certified armorer status, gunsmith, and former full service gun shop owner make little difference.
Over the past 26 or so years of my firearms ownership and deployment of my tools for many venues, I had amassed a whole cabinet full of firearms cleaning agents and concoctions to where it seemed each and every individual firearm that I owned had a particular recipe. Sometimes I'm not sure whether getting up in years or gaining experience tends to lead us to working smarter instead of harder. Either way, I'm not here to dispel any myths nor give away any secrets or unknown facts. Best thing to do is to take care of your firearms if you own them, and to prolong their life as much as possible. After all.....to me it's like preserving this country and it's heritage as well as the constitution. It's also getting the most out of one's investment. That may be a smaller amount now compared to the past as manufacturers try to compete in a global, downward spiraling economy, but sooner or later, we should get off the 'disposable' ideals that seem to be so prominent these days. Taking care of what you have is more important now than ever. Just like your vehicle. If you depend on it...take care of it. Just because the car manufacturer says change oil every 3k miles that doesn't mean you have to. Judge according to usage and the product. Use other (better than recommended) fluids and products in your vehicle and you may end up taking care of it better than what the manufacturer recommends. After all........the manufacturer wants to sell something, and more of it at the same time. They may also own a part of the oil company. Not necessarily a conflict of interest, more like an interest in raising conflict. Follow me?
Brands and types of firearms may also play an important role when it comes to end user care and what is necessary. Only the owner knows best, how the tools are used, and what affects them. Dirt roads with a '79 Chevy, mudding with a Dodge 4x4, or touring the country in a Chrysler, maybe towing a 5th wheel travel trailer with a Ford. Your choice in firearms should be just like your choice in vehicles....for the purpose. Then be willing to maintain according to usage. Therefore, I can't honestly lay down any suggested or firm regimen for taking the best care of your firearm. Only you can do that.
There are two things that I do firmly believe in for any firearm/owner.
A) NO RUST...never let it get started.
B) Over-cleaning can take as much toll as neglect in most cases.
I won't give any plugs for manufacturers. I've had almost all of them at one time or another except for S&W. I will give one plug for Gunzilla, and that it's made my life a whole lot easier, and cut my cleaning times down to the bone. It's become just about my only choice for most everything. I don't have any trade secrets nor standards for you to follow specifically in your firearms cleaning and care. If I did, that would be like the government telling you what you can, and cannot do and how to do it when you do. One of those things where you know best, and if you don't know now...it will come in time. So long as you can sleep at night without hearing your guns rust, your okay. So long as you know you can pull any tool out of the box and depend on it without a doubt for the job at hand.....you're doing fine. Keep up the good work.

__________________

Last edited by Ram Rod; 10-04-2011 at 10:38 PM.
Ram Rod is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2011, 10:52 PM   #563
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
tCan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Wake, NC
Posts: 1,128
Liked 112 Times on 78 Posts
Likes Given: 85

Default

I clean every time I use a gun. Because I only oil lightly, if I don't shoot for a couple weeks, I'll re-oil everything again.

I use the following process for my Remington 870. I can't say anything about the other guns listed in my signature, since they belong to my father and he prefers to clean them:

I keep things pretty basic. I use Hoppe's #9 solvent to get the spent powder out of the gun. All metal gets cleaned with Hoppe's including exterior surfaces. For the bore, I start with a copper brush soaked in solvent and scrub to loosen up the powder. After that I go to patches. I Keep using fresh material and solvent until my patches/brush comes out clean. Following that I wipe everything down with a clean rag to remove the solvent.

For oiling I use RemOil. All moving parts and friction surfaces get a solid amount of oil and then wiped down with a clean rag. All other metal surfaces get a light oiling. I try to get moving parts oiled pretty well, non-moving surfaces only lightly oiled, and the barrel somewhere in between, though I don't have any specific method of accomplishing this. I've heard that oils can cause the wood to swell and split, so I do my best to keep the oil off the wood, especially the checkering.

A spray bottle and a toothbrush or q-tips can be helpful for forcing grime out of hard to reach areas. If you want to avoid corrosion no square mm of the firearm can be ignored, and so cleaning can be a time consuming thing, but it must be done.

__________________
[Remington 870 12GA][Stoeger Model 3500 12GA][Savage 116 .30-06][Savage Model 10 Bull Barrel .223][Marlin 336SS .30-30][Marlin 39A .22][Marlin Model 60 22LR][Beretta PX4 Storm 9mm][Ruger MkIII 22LR]

They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.

Terry V Ohio Commentary

Last edited by tCan; 10-04-2011 at 11:16 PM.
tCan is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2011, 10:53 PM   #564
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Ancient City, Florida
Posts: 7
Default Gun cleaning

I always clean from the breech. As far as the aluminum rod vs steel, never had a nylon or vinyl covered rod leave plastic fouling as I always use a bore guide. The rod never touches the bore. I use to use aluminum multipiece rods, but have had most break or get loose over the years. I still have a few and use one on my old Marlin Glenfield 22 rifle from time to time, but for my other hunting rifles which I may have spent way too much for I would rather not use a multipiece rod. The bore guide I use also prevents chemicals from entering any place but the bore.

By the way one thing I failed to mention was my method of placing a thin film of oil on the portion of the rifle barrel hidden by the stock if the barrel isnt being removed. Since all my rifle barrels are floating slightly off the stock, I have found that a lint-free Kimwipe tissue used for cleaning lenses when coated with oil is thin enough and strong enough that it can be slid between the barrel and the stock. Using it much like you would buff shoes will apply a very thin coat of oil in those hidden areas in between barrel removals. I can on most of my guns cover all but a small area near the recoil lug, and I have never had a kimwipe tear and get lost doing this.

__________________
RTHOMAS is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2011, 10:58 PM   #565
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
RetiredLEO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: New York
Posts: 131
Default

Here's a tip: when inserting a cleaning rod, insert from breach end not muzzle end. You do this because you dont want to damage the riffleing on the muzzle end.

__________________

___________________________________________

Uphold the Law Sleep with a Cop

Be warned: I'm female, armed, and backed by law - Retired LEO
.

RetiredLEO is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2011, 11:01 PM   #566
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
voyager4520's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Colorado Springs,Colorado
Posts: 13
Default

With my Glocks, I clean once a month in the humid warm season, once every three months in the arid cool season if I don't carry them. If I do carry them I field strip clean once a week. I field strip clean after every time I shoot them.

Ballistol - for lubrication and corrosion protection
Hoppe's #9 - for cleaning the bore of the barrel
Hoppe's Elite Cleaner - for cleaning everything else including plastic

-Hoppe's Sontora Bulk synthetic patches
-Dewey 6 inch brass bore rod with Dewey "No Harm" phosphor bronze bore brushes with a brass center wire
-Glock plastic bore rod and brush for cleaning bore after using the phosphor bronze brush
-Old clean cotton rag for wiping the gun down
-Q-tips for cleaning hard to get places, with special care not to leave cotton behind anywhere in the gun
-Hoppe's nylon Utility Brush for brushing the breech face and under the extractor claw
-Old/expired soft plastic ID card for wrapping patches/rag around to clean in slide rails and under frame rails
-Glock Armorer Tool for detail stripping

The phosphor bronze bore brush leaves bronze residue embedded in the surface of the steel of the barrel, but it cleans the bore really well. I use the plastic bore rod and brush afterward to do the final cleaning and get as much of the bronze residue out of the bore as I can.

Rubbing alcohol would be better for cleaning metal surfaces than Hoppe's Elite Cleaner. If you clean a metal surface with Hoppe's Elite Cleaner, because it contains water, the metal surface could be more vulnerable to rust. Any metal surface I clean with Hoppe's Elite Cleaner I then wipe with Ballistol, let the Ballistol soak into the metal for a few minutes, then wipe away the excess oil.

I actually do use oil in my slides internals, but I wipe them as dry as possible before reassembly and I detail strip clean the slide after each range trip. If you don't plan to do that you don't want oil in the slide internals. I actually had surface rust develop in the internal areas of each of my Glock slides. After removing the rust with a bore brush and Hoppe's #9, I always put a coat of oil on the slide internals for corrosion protection now.

__________________
G23 G27

Last edited by voyager4520; 10-05-2011 at 12:20 PM.
voyager4520 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2011, 11:07 PM   #567
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
tCan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Wake, NC
Posts: 1,128
Liked 112 Times on 78 Posts
Likes Given: 85

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RetiredLEO View Post
Here's a tip: when inserting a cleaning rod, insert from breach end not muzzle end. You do this because you dont want to damage the riffleing on the muzzle end.
Doh! I responded to something not said.

If you clean from the muzzel, you run the risk of damaging the firing pin when the rod come out the breech end of the barrel anyway...
__________________
[Remington 870 12GA][Stoeger Model 3500 12GA][Savage 116 .30-06][Savage Model 10 Bull Barrel .223][Marlin 336SS .30-30][Marlin 39A .22][Marlin Model 60 22LR][Beretta PX4 Storm 9mm][Ruger MkIII 22LR]

They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.

Terry V Ohio Commentary

Last edited by tCan; 10-04-2011 at 11:18 PM.
tCan is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2011, 11:16 PM   #568
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Wayne,New Jersey
Posts: 104
Liked 2 Times on 1 Posts

Default Gun cleaning

I personally clean my weapons after a day of fireing. I sometimes use corrosive ammo. Depending on how much corrosive ammo i fired, will become a factor in determining what cleaner i use. If i used alot of corrosive i will use either hoppes or remline, but i always finish up with a little wd-40. I always wipe off excess, but leave a light coating. A buddy of mine who does alot of military contracts told me about the wd-40, and it works real good for me. I also fire mostly AK-47's and SKS's, so that also has to be taken into consideration, what works for the weapons i use may not work on other weapons. I always felt having my weapons clean is the same feeling i get when my car is all clean and shiny, just makes me feel GOOD"

__________________
aktommysks is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2011, 11:24 PM   #569
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
ccd8541's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 71
Default

What is your criteria for cleaning your guns?

Nothing set in stone:

AR: 2 custom built 5.56 SPR types, 2 LaRue 7.62(OBR, PredatAR) are usually cleaned around 1,000rds +/- 100's.
Bolt gun, Rem LTR .308 at a few hundred; GAP Crusader .308 after every range session, sometimes during a range session.
Handguns after hundreds of rounds but usually before 1,000rds.

How do you clean your guns?

Fast!

Bore punched using nylon brush run back and forth w/ solvent, let sit, patch several times and repeat. Wipe gunk off everything else as needed. Re-lube.

All cleaning products come from Bore-Tech. Lubrication is typically Froglube.
__________________

MIL/LE
U.S. Optics
chad@usoptics.com

ccd8541 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2011, 12:23 AM   #570
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Tarija,Bolivia
Posts: 11
Default

If I afire one round or 100 rounds I clean. If the firearm has been sitting for two months I'll flush and clean and re-oil. Dust can accumulate and cause oils to get gummy. I'm living is a more humid area than a month ago, so that cleaning and oiling may be changed to one month intervals. If I've been on an unusually dirty hike and not fired it I will clean before I lock it up.

Hoppe's #9 for general cleaning. I'm shooting lead cast so Hoppe's lead remover.
Oz

__________________

Last edited by oznbolivia; 10-05-2011 at 12:29 AM. Reason: forgot material
oznbolivia is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Firearms Forum Replies Last Post
Pistol Cleaning - Jag or Loop on Cleaning Rod? bf109 General Handgun Discussion 28 05-10-2012 05:24 PM
Chronograph Input. RMP1394-RLTW Ammunition & Reloading 10 03-09-2012 09:15 PM
some input please. ehfudd General Handgun Discussion 21 10-29-2010 03:43 AM
S&W 645... Input? MoHawk General Handgun Discussion 4 12-21-2009 05:22 PM
RNC wants your input Gramps Politics, Religion and Controversy 7 07-18-2008 05:43 PM