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-   -   Winchester Model 1894 rebuild (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f33/winchester-model-1894-rebuild-37050/)

ApacheBunny 01-18-2011 01:23 PM

Winchester Model 1894 rebuild
 
Hey guys, I am doing a full rebuild of my family heirloom Model 1894 that has been in my family since my great grandpa. It somewhat survived a house fire, and I have knocked all the rust off of it. So I was wondering if I could get some pointers and how to on disassembly.

What survived was the action, and the barrel. The tube magazine exploded, and the barrel is slightly bent, also the lever drops way too easily.

Also i will be posting pictures of its progress as I go along with the rebuild.

CA357 01-18-2011 06:48 PM

Sorry, but unless you want to spend a bunch of money to make it right, it sounds like a wall hanger.

ApacheBunny 01-18-2011 07:45 PM

yeah its one of those things that i have to decide if sentimental value is worth the cost of rebuilding it, the tube magazine is fixable, needs to be cleaned out and hammer back together since it is a seamed tube, the barrel if i open up the action i can see the other side except for a small bend, and it was actually covered during the fire so there isnt really much heat damage to the barrel

dteed4094 01-19-2011 10:24 AM

If you somehow miraculously managed to straighten the barrel you would have to have it heat treated and tested. There is probably not a lot of integrity in the action metal. Replace almost every part inside the action, New stock, Now that youve replaced almost every part of the rifle, hammer the magazine back into shape then decide it doesn't look as good as the rest of the gun and replace it also. You have at least $700 in a gun that you can probably buy for $250 that is not safe to shoot.

Hang it on the wall.

ApacheBunny 01-19-2011 12:34 PM

Just got the barrel straightened out in my shop and checked the rifling, now I am drilling the screw to the front band because the threads expanded, I'll just re-thread it later.

cpttango30 01-20-2011 10:38 AM

You do realize that house fires get extreamly hot right? So hot that the cartridges cooked off is to hot for that firearm to ever be fired again. The gun is done man. If you want to keep it have it reblued on the out side install a new hammer mag bolt and lever and stocks and hang it on the wall.

Quote:

In only 3 1/2 minutes, the heat from a house fire can reach over
1100 degrees Fahrenheit. The temperature can reach over 300
degrees in rooms that are not even on fire; this is hot enough to
melt plastic and kill the people in those rooms.

ApacheBunny 01-20-2011 10:50 AM

well I decided against the rebuild for family reasons, anyways, so I just put everything back together and I am sending it off to my cousin. so this thread is done and I might start that Browning Auto-5 rebuild.

rifleman55 01-26-2011 05:20 AM

Whatever you do, do not let anyone fire it. I'm a retired gunsmith and from what you described I'm 100% sure it has lost all heat treatment and would be unsafe to fire, it will blow up on whoever puts it togather, don't fire it, if your brother wants to restore it, break the tip off the FP, it's nothing but a wall hanger.

Sorry to hear of the damage.

As a general rule, if there is no charring of the wood and all springs are still good, it's usually OK to fix, but it hould still be checked by a gunsmith with a rockwell hardness tester before firong it.
I used to do a lot of refinish work on guns that were in gun safes in another part of the house from the fire, almost always had surface rust, some were bad though.
it's nothing to mess with.

A tip, if you ever have a house fire and your guns are not directly in the fire, spray them down really good as soon as possible with WD 40 then cover with grease and take them to your smith right away.
The steam from the fire being put out is what rusts them. The quicker you get to them and get the water off (the WD 40), the better chance the finish won't be ruined and require a lot more work to look good.
Insurance will many times pay the entire cost of having them fixed.
Used to be a real money maker when someone came in with 15 guns and an insurance company that would pay for restoration.

John K

ApacheBunny 01-26-2011 06:36 PM

yeah i made sure it wouldn't be fired and couldn't be loaded, and the rust was because it was raining after the fire had taken place, I gave it back to my cousin and he was happy that i worked as hard as i did to restore some of the metals luster. Fiend oil works wonders over other metal solvents


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