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Old 04-13-2014, 03:17 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by mahall View Post
In my opinion, if you find yourself dry firing regularly as a form of practice, your probably not ranging enough! Nothing substitutes for live rounds, from the draw to trigger control to keeping sites on target for follow up shots! Very little can be accomplished or polished from dry firing in my opinion, except, added insurance of firearms function-ability!
Just catching up on this thread and sorry for taking this thread a little off tangent, but this is by far one of the silliest thing's I've read.

Ask any good competitive shooter how much time they spend in dry fire practice prior to live fire range time. You might want to do some reading on Ben Stoeger, Gunsite Academy, or NSSF. And there's plenty of free dry fire practice drills on the web.

Why waste ammo (and money) developing basic muscle memory and fundamentals with live ammo when you can safely and inexpensively learn and reinforce these in dry fire. And learning to draw and reload with live ammo, rather than getting and reinforcing the mechanical fundamentals down in dry fire, is just asking for a negligent discharge. Plus I can work on trigger control in dry fire, knowing just how much to pull and hold before the break, reinforcing that muscle memory, much cheaper in dry fire.

You'll see improvements at the range with regular dry fire practice. For most shooters, then add the ball and dummy drill or others into live fire, and you'll uncover some more areas to improve.

Only other thing to add is take a class, and take more classes (intermediate, advanced, defensive). For those that say it's too expensive, think about how much ammo you waste at the range trying to get better when a well instructed course with classroom, dry fire and live fire time with an instructor will improve your shooting.

WARNING: ALL AMMO SHOULD BE NOWHERE NEAR YOUR GUN DURING DRY FIRE, CHECK AND RECHECK YOUR MAGAZINES AND CHAMBER THAT THEY ARE EMPTY, AND THEN REPEAT THIS AGAIN. More than one person has gone about dry fire practice and ND'd, or got distracted, reloaded, and went to do dry practice again and put a hole in something. Don't take my advice without reading about it or hearing about it from the experts.
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Old 04-22-2014, 03:35 AM   #52
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Default Sheared a Firing Pin

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Originally Posted by motorcyclenut View Post
That is generally what I have heard as well. Okay on center fire, not okay on rim fire. Would like to hear from someone who has experience (actually ruined a firing pin while dry firing).
I ruined a firing pin. I have a 1901 Remington Rolling Block that was made for export to Argentina (I was told) that was left to me by my grandfather. I used it in my youth and was told not to dry fire it. Being young and knowing everything, I ignored the advice and broke the firing pin, sheared it right off. Well, there was an old gun smith in the area who made parts for antique guns and he told me that the old ordinance steel would shear like that and the newer steel would not. He made me a new pin but I stopped shooting it because he also told me my gun was made for black powder shells, not smokeless. The way he put it, anything make for smokeless powder was OK to dry fire, anything made for black powder was not. I would not dry fire any gun made before the 50's, no rim fire (even though some manufacturers say it's OK, they will eventually peen the chamber face and fail) & no revolvers without a transfer bar regardless of year of manufacture. Any modern semi-auto is OK and should help the action over the long run.
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Old 04-22-2014, 03:39 AM   #53
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I ruined a firing pin. I have a 1901 Remington Rolling Block that was made for export to Argentina (I was told) that was left to me by my grandfather. I used it in my youth and was told not to dry fire it. Being young and knowing everything, I ignored the advice and broke the firing pin, sheared it right off. Well, there was an old gun smith in the area who made parts for antique guns and he told me that the old ordinance steel would shear like that and the newer steel would not. He made me a new pin but I stopped shooting it because he also told me my gun was made for black powder shells, not smokeless. The way he put it, anything make for smokeless powder was OK to dry fire, anything made for black powder was not. I would not dry fire any gun made before the 50's, no rim fire (even though some manufacturers say it's OK, they will eventually peen the chamber face and fail) & no revolvers without a transfer bar regardless of year of manufacture. Any modern semi-auto is OK and should help the action over the long run.
i don't ever dry fire my O/U shotguns because i always heard it could break the firing pins if done enough. i have no knowledge as to how true that is, but i refrain from doing so simply because i really don't know and would rather be safe than sorry.
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Old 04-22-2014, 04:07 PM   #54
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According to Glock its ok to dry fire their guns but if your going to be doing a bunch of it they recommend using snap caps.

http://us.glock.com/customer-service/faq

Also if your going to do a little dry firing with a rimfire those yellow plastic wall anchors make good temporary snap cap.
Great cheap idea.
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Old 04-23-2014, 12:36 PM   #55
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Now this is an ignorant gross generalization of the most sound training technique. I'm 57 years old, and dry-fired semi autos that i've owned for 30 to 40 plus years. 3 to be exact. A Colt 1911, a Browning HP and a pre-B CZ 75. In fact, i've only added new pistols last year.

I've dry-fired these 3 more than live-fired them (60 ti 150,000 rds ave.) and til today, they're 100% performers. Well yeah, I've replaced barrels and firing pins a couple times but not because they broke but because they're worn. Dry firing has kept me honed and I can say without reservation nor doubt that it is because of dedicated, regular dry-fire practice - every day. Except Christmas, and other holidays.

Maybe the newer composite pistols can't take it. Nothing better than all-steel.

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Old 05-02-2014, 09:38 PM   #56
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FYI- There are semi-soft plastic snap caps for rimfire guns. They will wear out eventually but they keep the firing pin from hitting the rim seat on the chamber.
Technically, a .22 firing pin should be short enough not to hit the chamber in any gun but we all know how well that holds up...

As far as centerfire guns; the only time you'll run into trouble is where the firing pin has a positive stop to its forward motion. For instance, I've seen some broken pins on double barreled shotguns because the pin was hitting the inside of the firing pin hole where the dimension changes. The "step." If the firing pin is held in place by a cross-pin, then it also can break.

I've found that most firing pins that have come into my shop broken have been due to poor fitting at the factory or a bad heat treat.

All in all, it's pretty rare in modern guns and the practice dry firing affords is totally worth the minimal risk of breaking a firing pin.

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Old 05-02-2014, 11:54 PM   #57
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Originally Posted by KJG67 View Post
Just catching up on this thread and sorry for taking this thread a little off tangent, but this is by far one of the silliest thing's I've read.

Ask any good competitive shooter how much time they spend in dry fire practice prior to live fire range time. You might want to do some reading on Ben Stoeger, Gunsite Academy, or NSSF. And there's plenty of free dry fire practice drills on the web.

Why waste ammo (and money) developing basic muscle memory and fundamentals with live ammo when you can safely and inexpensively learn and reinforce these in dry fire. And learning to draw and reload with live ammo, rather than getting and reinforcing the mechanical fundamentals down in dry fire, is just asking for a negligent discharge. Plus I can work on trigger control in dry fire, knowing just how much to pull and hold before the break, reinforcing that muscle memory, much cheaper in dry fire.

You'll see improvements at the range with regular dry fire practice. For most shooters, then add the ball and dummy drill or others into live fire, and you'll uncover some more areas to improve.

Only other thing to add is take a class, and take more classes (intermediate, advanced, defensive). For those that say it's too expensive, think about how much ammo you waste at the range trying to get better when a well instructed course with classroom, dry fire and live fire time with an instructor will improve your shooting.

WARNING: ALL AMMO SHOULD BE NOWHERE NEAR YOUR GUN DURING DRY FIRE, CHECK AND RECHECK YOUR MAGAZINES AND CHAMBER THAT THEY ARE EMPTY, AND THEN REPEAT THIS AGAIN. More than one person has gone about dry fire practice and ND'd, or got distracted, reloaded, and went to do dry practice again and put a hole in something. Don't take my advice without reading about it or hearing about it from the experts.
This. Dry work will help most shooters a lot. It is free except for your time. Heck, if I am not doing well at the range, I will stop and do some dry presses, then go back to shooting lead, it almost always gets me shooting better.

Have seen it in classes, at some point, the students get a little tired and not shooting their best. The instructor has them shoot a group, do some dry presses, then shoot another group. I would say 75% of the people do better on the second group.
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Old 05-03-2014, 02:46 AM   #58
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One story i heard, starting this controversy.

A revolver with poor choice of materials used.
When repetitive dry firing the firing pin became weak and would shatter. Sometimes send pieces of the pin out through the barrel.

Then dubbed no gun should ever be dry fired.


Personally i read the manual if it says you can then i do it, if not then i don't. If anything happens then i send it back on an account of manufacturers error, not users.


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Old 05-03-2014, 03:25 AM   #59
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Default Dry Firing Composite Pistols

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...Maybe the newer composite pistols can't take it...
I can't speak to the other composite pistols, but I've been dry firing and abusing Glocks for almost 25 years and they can and do take it. They never complain, they don't choke, puke & die, they just work.
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Old 05-04-2014, 12:57 PM   #60
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I can't speak to the other composite pistols, but I've been dry firing and abusing Glocks for almost 25 years and they can and do take it. They never complain, they don't choke, puke & die, they just work.
Then that's a plus for Glocks and the point that dry firing is part of sound training. I forgot to mention that snap caps are essential to a large extent. I must admit that I've never laid my hands on a Glock but I've always respected it. It's just that I personally find it difficult to unlearn the habits that have been ingrained for 30 plus years shooting 1911-like ergonomics. Why I even carry the CZ cocked and locked even if it's a first shot DA pistol. Maybe if I was younger, I'd be with a Glock.

The whole point is the soundness of dry firing. What with the escalating prices of ammo here in the P.I. $0.56 each for the cheapest .45 cartridge going all the way to almost $2.00 for premium ammo, $0.47 for the cheapest 9mm cartridge here today. Just lucky that reloads go for $0.18 each.

From where I come from, shooting ain't cheap. Dry-firing is free and has been a proven training aid to keep the levels up to par.
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