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Old 03-21-2014, 02:09 AM   #31
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Never ever ever dry fire a break barrel air gun, ever.


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Old 03-21-2014, 02:15 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by JonM View Post
Never use snap caps in a rimfire. The rim is solid metal and will do more damage to a 22lr than dry firing. The rim of a live 22 round is soft brass. Only use spent 22 cases for dry firing.

All ruger 22lr with the exception of early 22 bearcats can be safely dryfired unless the manual says dont. Ruger designs them with short enough pins not to hit metal on empty.

All modern centerfire it does no damage and is an urban myth. Early revolvers espescially sw revolvers were claimed to have issues with the pin snapping off were actually caused by poorly timed cylinders and nothing to do with dry firing.

Some sa xd/xdm pistols had and have too shallow relief cuts in the firing pin for the roll pin holding it in. These will break whether your dry firing or not. This is a defect but an artifact of tolerance stacking. SA needs to make that cut a bit longer. Most xd/xdm have no issues as such.

A lot of these myths gain legs because the owner doesnt understand how his/her gun actually operates and why it broke.
Since the 10/22 doesn't have a open bolt on last round, I would assume they for sure would have to have a system where the pin is not damaged. Because you HAVE to fire dry to know the gun is out because the bolt does not get held open.
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Old 03-21-2014, 02:28 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by molonlabexx View Post
Since the 10/22 doesn't have a open bolt on last round, I would assume they for sure would have to have a system where the pin is not damaged. Because you HAVE to fire dry to know the gun is out because the bolt does not get held open.
The breechface in the 10/22 has a cutout, so the firing pin hits nothing when dry fired. AFAIR the manual too says it's ok.
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Old 03-21-2014, 06:19 AM   #34
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It's okay to dry fire Glocks.
You have to in order to take them apart.
To use a Glock, in training, dry fire, is no longer recommended by Glock.

To break down yes, train, no.

Glock found, after thousands of dry firings, they did find some examples of unacceptable wear on the internals of their firearms, and some gun failures.
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Old 03-21-2014, 07:16 AM   #35
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It was my understanding that if you only dryfire a reasonable amount you have nothing to worry about. But if you don't tens of thousands of times you might have a issue. Even then it's still covered under glocks warranty
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Old 03-21-2014, 07:20 AM   #36
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IMO, i think reading and seeing what the owners manual says is the best course of action. some firearms can be dry fired with no problems, some can't. if in doubt, use snap caps.
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Old 03-21-2014, 09:15 AM   #37
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Default Why Is Dry Firing Bad?

In my opinion, if you find yourself dry firing regularly as a form of practice, your probably not ranging enough! Nothing substitutes for live rounds, from the draw to trigger control to keeping sites on target for follow up shots! Very little can be accomplished or polished from dry firing in my opinion, except, added insurance of firearms function-ability!


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Old 03-21-2014, 03:30 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by AR10 View Post
To use a Glock, in training, dry fire, is no longer recommended by Glock.

To break down yes, train, no.

Glock found, after thousands of dry firings, they did find some examples of unacceptable wear on the internals of their firearms, and some gun failures.
I may need an update... Which publication was it?
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Old 03-21-2014, 05:53 PM   #39
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Never ever ever dry fire a break barrel air gun, ever.


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Unfortunately I know this from experience. Once or twice you might get lucky and get no damage, but after that, there's goes your spring. I think I did it on one of those Daisy 1000fps rifles about 10 years ago. Didn't dare try it on my RWS 350 magnum or Benjamin super streak.
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Old 03-21-2014, 11:35 PM   #40
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Thanks for the responses, I have thought about asking from time to time and wanted to ask but always forget, then last night I was watching Youtube and an older guy had a S&W .38spl that didn't look that old and he was making the statement that you should never dry fire a gun like that because the firing pin is attached to the hammer, and I just wondered what would possess someone to say that. My opinion is that wouldn't the firing pin take on less stress being dry fired than live fired so why would dry firing do even more damage to the gun than live firing?
Just a vestige of days past when cap and ball revolvers were the newest thing. Urban legends like this can transcend generations. If the revovler is in otherwise good working condition, dry firing will do NO damage.

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To be fair, most service revolvers today (of the few remaining) have firing pin blocks and frame mounted firing pins. Until someone proves to me that dry firing a vintage S&W is totally fine, I will stick to the old wives' tales... Besides, you guys are supposed to practice dry firing. We have real jobs to do.
As a S&W revolver armorer, I can say w/o a doubt that you will not damage a S&W revolver by dry firing it. I cannot say the same about some lesser makes. Brittle parts can be damaged by impact.

If you send a revolver to S&W for a trigger job, they will dry fire it several thousand times to wear it in so they will be able to see where the friction is. If you are not happy with the trigger pull on your S&W revolver, dry fire it until your finger feels like falling off and you will see marked improvement. Detail clean and lube and it will feel liken a different gu
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