What epoxy or polymer filler matl to use?
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Old 01-21-2013, 01:03 AM   #1
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Default What epoxy or polymer filler matl to use?

I'm looking to install a Picatinny rail on the underneath side of my new Marlin XT-22RZ (a bolt action, threaded barrel .22LR). It has a polymer {plastic} stock. The Picatinny rail will be used to attach a bipod. The fore arm is pretty much hollow space - it does have some 'molded in' bulkheads ever couple of inches down the length of the fore arm and a rib/bulkhead that runs lengthwise down the bottom of the fore arm channel.

The long rib is centered in the middle of the fore arm channel and maybe 1/16" thick. And of course that's exactly where I will be drilling the two holes to mount the Rail (fore & aft). So, between the perpendicular supporting bulkheads and this long one running down the middle of the channel, I'm left with, what basically are four little compartments or chambers that I'm looking to put some kind of "filler" material in.

So....finally, my question: The filler material needs to harden and be able to be drilled through (to support the mounting bolts of the Picatinney rail). What type of resin can/should be used for this? (I'm looking for name brands and/or where to buy it).

I'm sure gun smithing folks run into this often - but I'm fairly new at having to try something like this. [Also: the Marlin molded swivel shape makes a bipod swivel mount unusable, just in case you were about to suggest that path]. Any suggestions will be much appreciated!

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Old 01-21-2013, 01:30 AM   #2
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All else fails- JB Weld.

jbweld.jpg

Give it a couple of days to cure completely, you can drill it, tap it, machine it, etc. Cheap and readily available- but is NOT a "fast cure" product.

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Old 01-21-2013, 02:40 AM   #3
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They do make JB Weld in a fast cure(5 minute) but the original slow cure (like pictured) is much stronger.

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Old 01-21-2013, 02:45 AM   #4
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J B Weld would be the one i would have suggested as well. make sure all your mating surfaces are very clean. degrease and also clean with alcohol as well. no matter how strong an adhesive is, it won't bond properly unless it's clean.

Hiwall, the JB Weld Quik is crap! i used some in the past, and won't ever use it again. only the slow curing original JB Weld.

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Old 01-21-2013, 03:11 AM   #5
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Have you ever messed with a plastic welder? They are easy to use. It may work for your situation

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Old 01-21-2013, 03:49 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by axxe55 View Post
J B Weld would be the one i would have suggested as well. make sure all your mating surfaces are very clean. degrease and also clean with alcohol as well. no matter how strong an adhesive is, it won't bond properly unless it's clean.
Might want to also rough up the surface just a little to make sure the JB Weld gets a good grip on the stock.
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Old 01-21-2013, 04:01 AM   #7
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Might want to also rough up the surface just a little to make sure the JB Weld gets a good grip on the stock.
excellent point! sometimes when you do somethings so many times you forget some of the finer details.
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Old 01-21-2013, 04:47 AM   #8
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Why not just drill through and use machine screws and nuts on the inside of the forearm?

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Old 01-21-2013, 05:36 AM   #9
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another option would bethis Boyd's laminated stock already has two front sling swivels for using a bipod.

RIMFIRE HUNTER MARLIN® XT CLIP SERIES HEAVY BARREL CHANNEL STOCK PEPPER LAMINATE (FINISHED)

priced at $92, it's a good deal. even if you secure the rail for mounting the bipod, the forearm is still going to have a lot of flex. i used one very similar to this on my Savage M93r17 and it's a great stock for the price. i have used them on another rifle as well. Boyd's is what i would suggest instead of trying to modifying the factory flimsy stock.
www.boydsgunstocks.com

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Old 01-21-2013, 04:02 PM   #10
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I would ask "what will you be using the gun for"? The conditions you will be using it in can influence how you handle the situation. Boyds makes great wood stocks but extra care may be needed in damp environments. Synthetic stocks are better there. I used JB weld in my Mosin Nagant stock to bed and reinforce some spots.

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