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Old 06-25-2014, 01:21 AM   #21
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Some really good advice already posted. Couple of thoughts-

1. If you have not done so, incorporate. This limits liability to the business, and not your personal assets. otherwise if I sue you over work you did that I CLAIM caused me to be injured, I am going after your car, your house, your kid's college savings fund, etc etc.

2. Check local gun dealers that do NOT have their own gunsmith. Let them know you are available, leave some business cards there (What do you MEAN you don't have business cards?!?!?) along with a basic price listing (d&t, mount scope, $xx, etc)

3. Assuming you have your 01 FFL, get registered on Gunbroker, and register in their "find a FFL" database. There are folks that buy or sell a gun that need a FFL for the transfer- usually receiving. Gives you potential future customers coming to the door.
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Old 06-25-2014, 01:36 AM   #22
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Good Luck....the road of experience is the toughest and best road to take. If you fall down 7 times, get up 8 times.
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Old 06-25-2014, 03:35 AM   #23
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Quote:
1. If you have not done so, incorporate.
Or more realistically a LLC (limited liability company).
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Old 06-25-2014, 04:06 AM   #24
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Yep- and LLC is a good alternative. The goal of both is to limit liabilities- in all forms- to the business, and not to you personally.

And when you get a chance, if you have not already done something similar, see if the community College system has a class available- something like Managing a Small Business. A lot of those are taught by part time faculty that ARE successful owners of a small business.
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Old 06-27-2014, 12:26 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GSmith1883 View Post
I am looking into a cerakote kit , now if I can talk my wife into letting me put a firearm coated with chemicals in our oven (correction, her oven) is another story!
Cerakote has an air-dry version now, or you could Duracoat. It's the blasting of parts that gets expensive, might look at a local auto paint shop to see if they'll do that for a fee.

Keep us posted.

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Old 06-27-2014, 11:41 AM   #26
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You have to sandblast before Ceracoat? I wod never trust any gun parts to an automotive shop. You can screw things up pretty quick with a sandblaster. Really, a small unit to do gun parts shouldn't be that expensive. And who doesn't already have a compressor? Also, is the air dry version as good as the baked version?
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Old 06-27-2014, 12:43 PM   #27
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most sand that might be used in most automobile blasting operations would more than likely be too course and do more damage than good.

check out Harbor Freight, Northern Tool Supply or other tool outlets like Eastwood Restoration for a small table top blasting cabinet. i would also suggest using fine glass bead for blasting. it is what i have used in the past to get a matte finish on a few that i have refinished, with good results.

most blasting cabinets don't require a lot of pressure to get good results, but they use a lot of volume of air, so you need lots of tank volume or the compressor will wear itself out running all the time. and extra tank piped inline works great to increase the volume of the air system.
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Old 06-28-2014, 05:26 AM   #28
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Straight from the source:

Quote:
WWW.CERAKOTE.COM
Phase 3: surface-prep
6
Surface Prep:
Begin by plugging the bore at both the chamber and the muzzle end of the barrel prior
to blasting. Grit blast the parts with #100 to #120 grit aluminum oxide or garnet sand
at 80 to 100 psi.
Strive for an even blast pattern over the surfaces of the parts. Lightly
blast (30-40 psi) non-metal parts such as: wood, fiberglass, plastic or polymer. Hard anodizing
does not need to be removed if it withstands 3-5 seconds of blasting at normal
blast pressure (80-100 psi) in one location without coming off the part.
TIP:
If the part’s surface is still shiny
after blasting, you haven’t blasted
enough.

• If you use too coarse of grit, the
microscopic valleys on the part’s
surface will be too deep for the 1.0
mil (.001”) coating to completely
fill while covering the corresponding
“peaks” sufficiently to assure a
satisfactory coating.
• Don’t use sand that has been previously
used to clean dirty, greasy
or oily parts. Doing so will contaminate
your parts.
• When blasting hard anodizing or
delicate substrates such as plastics,
polymers, wood, fiberglass, be sure
to be 8-10” away and lightly etch
the part only to remove the sheen
and to avoid an over aggressive
blast profile.
CAUTION:
• If you use #120 grit, be sure the grit does not wear out as you are using it. #120 is pretty
fine at the start, and will wear to an ineffective dust.
• DO NOT use any type of round blasting media such as glass beads or steel shot. Round
media will dimple the surface rather than etching it, and will not yield a sufficient blast
profile for optimum coating adhesion.
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Old 06-28-2014, 11:55 AM   #29
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That's kinda scary. I don't know if I could bring myself to sandblast any of my guns. Particularly to "paint" it.
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Old 06-28-2014, 03:31 PM   #30
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Depends on the gun. A silky smooth highly polished Colt Python with their royal blue finish is one thing. Grand-dad's old break-open 12 gauge that has been stored in the back of a damp closet for 50 years and left to rust is another. Blasting cleans and increases the surface area and provides a textured surface for some finishes to bite into. Parkerizing is a type of finish that is enhanced by a blasted surface.

Back in my high-school days I worked part-time for an industrial coatings manufacturer as a sand-blaster. They used small steel test panels (2.5 X 6 in.) for testing the new coatings that they developed. Hundreds of them had to be sand-blasted to different levels of texture and surface finish to see which worked best for a particular type of coating they were working on. After the panels were sprayed and cured, they put them through all kinds of testing. Baking them, freezing them, salt water fog, acid fog, chemical baths etc. They put a LOT of work into testing their products and they know what works and what doesn't. It's always best to follow their recommendations to get the best results.

Last edited by Highpower; 06-28-2014 at 03:33 PM.
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