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Old 09-24-2013, 04:42 AM   #11
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I'm thinking it could be done On a lathe using a large thread cutter.

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Old 09-24-2013, 05:01 AM   #12
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Ok I found blueprints for a manual rifling machine. I might actually build it as a weekend project

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Old 09-24-2013, 05:23 AM   #13
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Find a copy of a book titled Foxfire 5. Has a pretty good section on old time gun building, including
a rifling machine and how to use it.

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Old 10-14-2013, 04:57 PM   #14
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FWIW, back in the day when a maker of rifles would be rifling his own barrels-

Start with a slender, straight wooden rod longer than the barrel. Wrap a cord or string around the rod. If you want one turn in 48", then the cord wil make one 360 turn in 48 " of length. Mark the path of the cord with a pencil, then use a chisel to remove wood along that spiral, keeping depth uniform.

When finished, and you place the rod thru a collar, with a fixed tooth from the collar to the groove, when you pull the rod in or out, it will rotate- once every 48". On the end of the rod that will go into the barrel, (or a thinner steel extension that will fit into the barrell) attach a hardened steel cutting tooth. Tooth is attached with a hinge on the side of the rod.

Slip paper between the hinge and the rod until tooth contacts the barrel. Lube the tooth with lard. Run in an out about 20 times, leaving a spiral scratch on the inside of the barrel. Add another strip if paper, which will push the cutter out further. Another 20 stokes, in and out. Repeat until that single tooth has cut the groove as deep as you want.

Remove rod, remove paper, clean tooth, rotate barrel, begin cutting the SECOND groove. Which explains why rifling was so shallow, and two groove rifling was popular (instead of 6 grooves).

Gun makers had a device to run that rod in and out of the barrel with very little effort on their part. It was called an apprentice. A bit of regular paper is ABOUT .004 inches thick. 20 stokes to cut that deep, multiplied by the number of cuts you need to reach desired depth. NOT a fast process.

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Old 10-14-2013, 07:03 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayCody View Post
I'm thinking it could be done On a lathe using a large thread cutter.
I was thinking of doin this for alittle cannon but never got around to it. Something like a 3 or 4 lead acme thread cut with a grv tool. The only problem I could see would be chatter and taper if you went much over 2 or 3 inches.
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Old 10-15-2013, 03:01 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c3shooter View Post
FWIW, back in the day when a maker of rifles would be rifling his own barrels-

Start with a slender, straight wooden rod longer than the barrel. Wrap a cord or string around the rod. If you want one turn in 48", then the cord wil make one 360 turn in 48 " of length. Mark the path of the cord with a pencil, then use a chisel to remove wood along that spiral, keeping depth uniform.

When finished, and you place the rod thru a collar, with a fixed tooth from the collar to the groove, when you pull the rod in or out, it will rotate- once every 48". On the end of the rod that will go into the barrel, (or a thinner steel extension that will fit into the barrell) attach a hardened steel cutting tooth. Tooth is attached with a hinge on the side of the rod.

Slip paper between the hinge and the rod until tooth contacts the barrel. Lube the tooth with lard. Run in an out about 20 times, leaving a spiral scratch on the inside of the barrel. Add another strip if paper, which will push the cutter out further. Another 20 stokes, in and out. Repeat until that single tooth has cut the groove as deep as you want.

Remove rod, remove paper, clean tooth, rotate barrel, begin cutting the SECOND groove. Which explains why rifling was so shallow, and two groove rifling was popular (instead of 6 grooves).

Gun makers had a device to run that rod in and out of the barrel with very little effort on their part. It was called an apprentice. A bit of regular paper is ABOUT .004 inches thick. 20 stokes to cut that deep, multiplied by the number of cuts you need to reach desired depth. NOT a fast process.
Sweet info I never knew thats how it use to be done kinda kool but sounds like a MF to do
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Old 10-15-2013, 04:13 AM   #17
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Not unless you are the apprentice.


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Old 10-15-2013, 05:09 AM   #18
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Lol good point

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Old 10-15-2013, 05:18 AM   #19
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The soft iron barrels were forged from laps. The laps or strips of iron were wrapped around a mandrel. The mandrel created the raw bore. By 1820 Hammer Forging plants were making barrels. Gun builders started buying completed barrels rather then make them. Remington started as barrel maker.

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Old 10-15-2013, 05:19 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nitestalker View Post
The soft iron barrels were forged from laps. The laps or strips of iron were wrapped around a mandrel. The mandrel created the raw bore. By 1820 Hammer Forging plants were making barrels. Gun builders started buying completed barrels rather then make them. Remington started as barrel maker.
Sweet deal
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