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Old 06-17-2009, 06:25 PM   #11
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I've been a tool room machinist for Caterpillar 11 years. I use newer CNC Mazak machines with conversational programming but have used many different codes in the past as well as all the manual machines and setups. If I can help you with anything let me know. Rob.

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Old 06-17-2009, 06:45 PM   #12
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I've been a tool room machinist for Caterpillar 11 years. I use newer CNC Mazak machines with conversational programming but have used many different codes in the past as well as all the manual machines and setups. If I can help you with anything let me know. Rob.
thanks for the offer, can you tell me how the code is setup? Like say you show up to work and you have a new project, how would you start?
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Old 06-17-2009, 06:57 PM   #13
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I'm up to my last MOD for the gunsmith course I am taking which is handguns; the only reason I took the course. In the other MOD's they mentioned using a CNC machine and its functions, but they never went into detail on how it works. Does anyone have experience with a CNC? Operating it? What other uses are there for a CNC machine?

Easy as flying the Space Shuttle!


My way of saying that you'd need to know basic machining, have a couple hundred hours with all the various machines (lathe, mill, etc.), then move up to CNC. Even then, you have your basic CNC, your advanced CNC, and your OMFG CNC. Learning never really ends, nor should it.

Other uses? What other uses are there for a 1911? Sure, you can use it as a hammer, but that isn't what it was designed to do. Sorry to sound harsh, but it's a very specific tool for a very specific task. Yeah, I'm sure someone had a CNC lathe with dozens of bells and whistles (just like some folks will put every accessory on the AR), but are they really necessary for the job at hand? I think the job determines which tool to use, and, more importantly, which tool NOT to use. An A-bomb will kill folks just fine, but it's not a CQB weapon (well, maybe once).

CNC is good for rapid prototyping, as you can program it to spit out a piece made of plastic to give you an idea of the finished product. When you get the design refined, then you use metal and dial in the high tolerances.

BTW, I'm not a machinist, though I'd love to learn to use a metal lathe for some basic gunsmithing. Just don't find a local school that offers the courses.

The last HS I taught at had 12 industrial metal lathes, but no teacher. They could no longer put them to use during or after school (adult classes) - the liability insurance was too high.
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Old 06-17-2009, 07:18 PM   #14
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thanks for the offer, can you tell me how the code is setup? Like say you show up to work and you have a new project, how would you start?
(Simply)

Projects are started the same way. A print is given to the programmer/machinist showing the part, tolerances and material. The machinist selects which tools will be needed and gathers them for set-up. Programmer goes to the control and writes the G&M codes. The tools are set-up in the machine and the material is placed into the spindle or chuck or vise, whatever the workholding is on the machine. The program is usually checked on the control (run thru without machine actually doing anything) to check for mistakes or typos. After the tool lenghts are set in the offset, the green button gets pushed and machine makes part. Machinist checks part to tolerances and makes the changes in the offset to make sure the sizing will be right and the part is in tolerance.

What else you wanna know?
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Old 06-17-2009, 07:33 PM   #15
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Hi Dynastyofnext,

I have had two manufacturing jobs that required me to be able to operate & program CNC machines.

The first, I worked in the engineering department of a very high-end furniture company. We had two 3-axis Komo CNC routers. They ran production parts for almost every piece that we made. Lots of fun to program & very challenging at times due to the special nature of some of our parts.

Second, a 2- axis CNC water jet machine that cut parts out of rubber & foam by the hundreds. The complete opposite of the first job. We used nesting software to do a lot of the programing based on AutoCAD drawings. Very simple process from start to finish.

Both of these places really benefited in a big way from having the CNC technology available. Production parts were made faster & with much closer tolerances than if they had been made with traditional methods. The possible manufacturing applications are limited only by the imagination.

In my experience, each machine & software setup is different and you need to be trained specifically for the machine & software that you would be using, as well as having a general understanding of CNC programing & technology.

I would say that it is beyond the scope of a forum like this to really explain to you how use a CNC machine. However, if I had you at the second job, I could make you into a competent operator in a day; and a programmer in a week. But that is with the simplest of Machine/software setups I can imagine. At the first job, We would spend months getting people trained to operate/program our machines.

Hope this helps, Canis

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Old 06-17-2009, 08:27 PM   #16
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[QUOTE=indy_kid;118687]
Easy as flying the Space Shuttle!



QUOTE]

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(Simply)



What else you wanna know?
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Originally Posted by caniswalensis View Post
Hi Dynastyofnext,



Hope this helps, Canis

Thanks for the Info, know of a good place to get some training on a cnc?
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Old 06-17-2009, 08:34 PM   #17
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Comminity Colleges and Vocational Schools are your best bet. My training came through a job and control specific schooling that machine mfrs do for customers (my employers). I have programming certs from Hardinge, Emco-maier, Haas and Okuma. Basic lathe and mill is pretty easy. I also have C-axis programming. (That is live tooling on a lathe for drilling, milling, tapping, etc.)

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Old 06-17-2009, 08:57 PM   #18
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Comminity Colleges and Vocational Schools are your best bet. My training came through a job and control specific schooling that machine mfrs do for customers (my employers). I have programming certs from Hardinge, Emco-maier, Haas and Okuma. Basic lathe and mill is pretty easy. I also have C-axis programming. (That is live tooling on a lathe for drilling, milling, tapping, etc.)
thanks, So what would a simple program look like? How is it written?
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Old 06-17-2009, 09:42 PM   #19
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First, there are few simple programs. It is all relatvie to the part.

Basic turn:

N0001 G97 S1000 M4 T0101 (spindle on at 1000 rpm, tool #1)
G00 G99 X1. Z.1 M08 (rapid move, inches per minute feed, coolant on)
G01 Z-1. F.01 (linear interprolation, 1" length of cut at .01" per minute)
X1.46 (move up on X)
G03 X1.5 Z-1.02 R.02 F.005 (circular intrerprolation and .02 radius cut)
G01 Z-1.5 (linear interprolation to 1.5" length)
G00 X1.55 Z-1.48 M09 (rapid move off part and coolant off)
G28 U0. W0. M05 (go home and stop spindle)
M30 (end program)

That is a part that will measure 1" dia for 1", 1.5" dia with radius at 1.5" from face of part.

That basic program does not use tool nose radius compensaton (G41/G42) to help control part size. In theory, the length and radius would be off depending on the radius of the cutting insert.

That is also a gerneral program for Fanuc control. Okuma uses G94 for ipm and no use for G28. Also, not all Fanucs use G28.....

This can get lenghty and complicated. I did not even try to cover canned programs.

Also, whole comments within () will not be read by the control, they would not be written into the actual program. I used them to tell you what was happening.

Also, I did not use constant surface feet per minute that makes the spindle change speed at each dia.

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Old 06-17-2009, 09:44 PM   #20
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Skull,

.oooo1???? How? If the air temp changes a couple of degrees the tolerances are out,lol. Don't blow on it!!

I like how where I work we machine the parts in one temperature and they CMM them in another room with a different temp,lol. Makes it interesting figuring out how much it will grow or shrink sometimes.

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