Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > Gunsmithing & Do-It-Yourself Projects > Gunsmithing Forum > know how to use a CNC machine?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-17-2009, 04:53 AM   #1
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
dynastyofnext's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 318
Default know how to use a CNC machine?

I'm up to my last MOD for the gunsmith course I am taking which is handguns; the only reason I took the course. In the other MOD's they mentioned using a CNC machine and its functions, but they never went into detail on how it works. Does anyone have experience with a CNC? Operating it? What other uses are there for a CNC machine?

__________________
Every day above ground is a beautiful day.
dynastyofnext is offline  
 
Reply With Quote

Join FirearmsTalk.com Today - It's Free!

Are you a firearms enthusiast? Then we hope you will join the community. You will gain access to post, create threads, private message, upload images, join groups and more.

Firearms Talk is owned and operated by fellow firearms enthusiasts. We strive to offer a non-commercial community to learn and share information.

Join FirearmsTalk.com Today! - Click Here


Old 06-17-2009, 10:09 AM   #2
Moderator
FTF_MODERATOR.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
c3shooter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Third bunker on the right,Central Virginia
Posts: 16,516
Liked 8638 Times on 3742 Posts
Likes Given: 1324

Default

Disclaimer- I DO NOT use CNC machines myself, but have been around enuff manufacturing facilities that do.

Unlike a standard machinist's lathe or milling machine, where you set operations thru a mechanical dial, a CNC unit is controlled by a computer, which directs tool speed, movement in 3 dimensions, etc. Very handy for DUPLICATING multiple pieces parts.

Instead of the machinist turning a set of dials that move the cutter, a computer software program directs it. Allows program to be copied and sent to user to install. Also allows for high degree of accuracy in complex machinings. But to set up program first time, requires knowledge of the machine code (seem to recall G code being common one used).

Does every shop need one? IMHO- no. If you are going into the manufacturing business, might be worthwhile.

__________________
c3shooter is online now  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2009, 02:50 PM   #3
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
dynastyofnext's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 318
Default

Thanks for the help. Now all I gotta do is find out what this G code is and how to use it.

__________________
Every day above ground is a beautiful day.
dynastyofnext is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2009, 03:13 PM   #4
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
hunter Joe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 2,413
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I operated CNC machining centers for nearly 25 years and there is a lot more to it than learning G-Code programming. Speeds and feeds, M-Code functions, using gauges, tool maintenance, set-up, and the list goes on and on. Stay in school.

__________________

God, Family, Guns, in that order.

hunter Joe is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2009, 03:19 PM   #5
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Rogers, AR
Posts: 6,262
Liked 2 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I'm a machinist by trade and can run most types of cnc mills, lathes(vertical and horizontal),etc..

You can write programs to do whatever the machine is capable of using auto-cad or whatever the machine is set up to accept.
Learning the ins and outs of cnc machining is not small feat and would require someone who already knows what they are doing. Otherwise, you'll probably crash it and jack it all up. I went to school for this ,lol.

I work in the aerospace industry for Pratt & Whitney machining jet engine parts for the military and commercial planes holding as tight of tolearnces as + or -1 thousandth or +/- .001 for large diameters. When I worked with high speed cnc machines we would hold as much as 4 microns or .0004.

I also use to run the frames for wilson combat 1911's. Very tight tolerances there.

Here's the G and M codes, but they can vary from machine to machine.

Does it ha ve a FANUC control? What type of CNC is it? I might can help from here.

MachineMate Inc - Full List of CNC Codes

__________________
Gojubrian is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2009, 03:21 PM   #6
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Rogers, AR
Posts: 6,262
Liked 2 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hunter Joe View Post
I operated CNC machining centers for nearly 25 years and there is a lot more to it than learning G-Code programming. Speeds and feeds, M-Code functions, using gauges, tool maintenance, set-up, and the list goes on and on. Stay in school.
Pretty much,lol. I've been at it for 13yrs, man am I a lucky guy.
__________________
Gojubrian is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2009, 04:05 PM   #7
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
dynastyofnext's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 318
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gojubrian View Post
I'm a machinist by trade and can run most types of cnc mills, lathes(vertical and horizontal),etc..

You can write programs to do whatever the machine is capable of using auto-cad or whatever the machine is set up to accept.
Learning the ins and outs of cnc machining is not small feat and would require someone who already knows what they are doing. Otherwise, you'll probably crash it and jack it all up. I went to school for this ,lol.

I work in the aerospace industry for Pratt & Whitney machining jet engine parts for the military and commercial planes holding as tight of tolearnces as + or -1 thousandth or +/- .001 for large diameters. When I worked with high speed cnc machines we would hold as much as 4 microns or .0004.

I also use to run the frames for wilson combat 1911's. Very tight tolerances there.

Here's the G and M codes, but they can vary from machine to machine.

Does it ha ve a FANUC control? What type of CNC is it? I might can help from here.

MachineMate Inc - Full List of CNC Codes
I dont have a specific machine just wanted to learn how to use one. If it was as simple as autocad input and hit drill, it would of been cake. It looks more like its C+ style coding, how do you get a design out of these machines? I'm familiar with Autocad and circuit building is it anything close to the same?
__________________
Every day above ground is a beautiful day.
dynastyofnext is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2009, 04:22 PM   #8
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
skullcrusher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Ohio,Ohio
Posts: 10,949
Liked 17 Times on 12 Posts

Default

CNC machinist here as well. Getting a post from a cad system can be done a few ways. RS232 cable, disk or flash drive depending on the machine and control. Autocad and others need to be programmed to post the codes that that specific control accepts. It can work great, but the cad produces large number of codes and lines even for a simple turn operation.

I program direct G & M codes for some different but popular controls. They are not the same codes for each control. Even within the same make of control, the codes can vary.

Goju, I programmed some Fanuc Super Precision controls that I programmed to .00001 and held tols of +/- .0001 on a regular basis. That is some cool shat right there!

__________________

From C3Shooter:
Skullcrusher, you are evil, sick, demented, twisted- and my hero!


Quote:
Originally Posted by pandamonium View Post
...without the Second, we cannot protect the rest!
skullcrusher is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2009, 04:35 PM   #9
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
dynastyofnext's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 318
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by skullcrusher View Post
CNC machinist here as well. Getting a post from a cad system can be done a few ways. RS232 cable, disk or flash drive depending on the machine and control. Autocad and others need to be programmed to post the codes that that specific control accepts. It can work great, but the cad produces large number of codes and lines even for a simple turn operation.

I program direct G & M codes for some different but popular controls. They are not the same codes for each control. Even within the same make of control, the codes can vary.

Goju, I programmed some Fanuc Super Precision controls that I programmed to .00001 and held tols of +/- .0001 on a regular basis. That is some cool shat right there!
.....kind of sounds like you guys hang out at Area 51; whats a Fanuc SPC?
__________________
Every day above ground is a beautiful day.
dynastyofnext is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2009, 05:15 PM   #10
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
skullcrusher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Ohio,Ohio
Posts: 10,949
Liked 17 Times on 12 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dynastyofnext View Post
.....kind of sounds like you guys hang out at Area 51; whats a Fanuc SPC?
Maybe a super precision control? Usually the machines are specified SP and the control itself is programmable to 5 digits to the right of the decimal point. The machines are built to tighter tols and the servos handle the minute moves.

For instance: Hardinge T42 SP w/ a Fanuc 18T control is a super precision lathe and the control is programmable to .00001 inches.
__________________

From C3Shooter:
Skullcrusher, you are evil, sick, demented, twisted- and my hero!


Quote:
Originally Posted by pandamonium View Post
...without the Second, we cannot protect the rest!
skullcrusher is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Firearms Forum Replies Last Post
Machine Gunnner Grandma . 1861 The Club House 0 06-08-2009 08:26 PM
Yankee Hill Machine jeepcreep927 AR-15 Discussion 1 12-21-2008 12:41 PM



Newest Threads