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Old 04-16-2010, 05:33 PM   #11
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In spite of all of the criticism from others about how you approached the problem, rest assured those who are indeed "real" gunsmiths have occasionally (even if they deny it) had what we can call "Ooops moments."

[How do those writers define "real" gunsmiths? Surely they have a non-published set of criteria more significant than this man(or woman) spent money to buy an ATF license and stuck a gunsmith sign in their window? Do 'real' gunsmiths even use the Internet? Perhaps what they meat was a gunsmith pre-approved by Taurus? How does a non-original purchaser learn from Taurus what the website of such an individual is? And, do such individuals give advice to others for free, and is there a chance a non-disclosure agreement prohibits certain useful information from being released without money changing hands? Lots of issues buried in such comments.]

Should someone do research to learn what can and can't be blued? Sure. Is all of the information about each part from every gun ever made quickly accessible? Nope. And when it is available occasionally it has resulted from someone else's ooops moment and the spreading of the word,

Recommended reading from Brownell's: Gunsmith Tips and Kinks. Get all 4 and read them first before beginning future projects. A lot of it may not apply to what specific project you may have in mind this afternoon, but all of it is good to know and to have on hand for later checking.

One of my own ooops moments was the discovery that OEM Winchester rifle barrels are not easily blued. In that decade I hadn't even heard of Brownells. A free tip, do not keep materials capable of removing the bluing anywhere near a genuine Winchester.

Another ooops moment of note was the time I dropped an antique Colt DA revolver off with a timing issue at what I had presumed was a "real" gunsmith 'cause he had a sign, and an FFL, and a shop, customers and all that other "evidence" that he was indeed a 'real' gunsmith only to 8 months later get back a frame and a brown paper bag containing most of the parts that had been in the gun. [We won't even discuss what this "real" gunsmith did to someone else's pre-war drilling.] Further questioning and inquiries disclosed in spite of prior lies to the contrary said individual (a "real" gunsmith) had never seen or worked on anything like that and couldn't wait to take it apart, then get drunk and lose pieces. Lets just say it took decades of waiting for the Internet to be created before that particular ooops was corrected. As a result of this 30 year experience I find I have acquired a certain sensitivity to the phrase, 'find a "real" gunsmith.'

Perhaps, finding a gunsmith with a proven track-record of 'succesfully' doing the exact kind of fix desired on the exact type of firearm in question is a better term to suggest. Experience however shows that often those people are rarely in your state and all too often have a fairly small Internet footprint.
Often, the less common the gun, the smaller their Inet footprint. In those cases posting a question seeking free advice is actually a good idea. Who knows, a valid tip may come. (Do this before embarking on the new projects.) Just give the question enough time to generate a response and consider posting the same question on two or three different forums to expand the hit probability.

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Old 04-17-2010, 03:13 AM   #12
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Vinager will remove blueing.

You have to be very careful when doing it though. I left mine in a little too long and now I have pitting on one side of the part. Nothing big but it sure does suck to do something like that.

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Old 04-17-2010, 09:53 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by superc View Post
In spite of all of the criticism from others about how you approached the problem, rest assured those who are indeed "real" gunsmiths have occasionally (even if they deny it) had what we can call "Ooops moments."

[How do those writers define "real" gunsmiths? Surely they have a non-published set of criteria more significant than this man(or woman) spent money to buy an ATF license and stuck a gunsmith sign in their window? Do 'real' gunsmiths even use the Internet? Perhaps what they meat was a gunsmith pre-approved by Taurus? How does a non-original purchaser learn from Taurus what the website of such an individual is? And, do such individuals give advice to others for free, and is there a chance a non-disclosure agreement prohibits certain useful information from being released without money changing hands? Lots of issues buried in such comments.]

Should someone do research to learn what can and can't be blued? Sure. Is all of the information about each part from every gun ever made quickly accessible? Nope. And when it is available occasionally it has resulted from someone else's ooops moment and the spreading of the word,

Recommended reading from Brownell's: Gunsmith Tips and Kinks. Get all 4 and read them first before beginning future projects. A lot of it may not apply to what specific project you may have in mind this afternoon, but all of it is good to know and to have on hand for later checking.

One of my own ooops moments was the discovery that OEM Winchester rifle barrels are not easily blued. In that decade I hadn't even heard of Brownells. A free tip, do not keep materials capable of removing the bluing anywhere near a genuine Winchester.

Another ooops moment of note was the time I dropped an antique Colt DA revolver off with a timing issue at what I had presumed was a "real" gunsmith 'cause he had a sign, and an FFL, and a shop, customers and all that other "evidence" that he was indeed a 'real' gunsmith only to 8 months later get back a frame and a brown paper bag containing most of the parts that had been in the gun. [We won't even discuss what this "real" gunsmith did to someone else's pre-war drilling.] Further questioning and inquiries disclosed in spite of prior lies to the contrary said individual (a "real" gunsmith) had never seen or worked on anything like that and couldn't wait to take it apart, then get drunk and lose pieces. Lets just say it took decades of waiting for the Internet to be created before that particular ooops was corrected. As a result of this 30 year experience I find I have acquired a certain sensitivity to the phrase, 'find a "real" gunsmith.'

Perhaps, finding a gunsmith with a proven track-record of 'succesfully' doing the exact kind of fix desired on the exact type of firearm in question is a better term to suggest. Experience however shows that often those people are rarely in your state and all too often have a fairly small Internet footprint.
Often, the less common the gun, the smaller their Inet footprint. In those cases posting a question seeking free advice is actually a good idea. Who knows, a valid tip may come. (Do this before embarking on the new projects.) Just give the question enough time to generate a response and consider posting the same question on two or three different forums to expand the hit probability.
Supc is right, often people dont ask if a gunsmith is even certified.
I remember talking to a couple of people in my area about rebluing a shotgun and we got around to the fact that I was interested in gunsmithing and I wanted to know where either of them gone to school. Person A's response was "Gunsmiths dont go to school, we learn on our own". Person B hadnt gone to school but rather had been a gunsmith apprentace for some time.
Person A would definitely not be a person I would take ANY firearm to for any reason. And I'd still be slightly warry about Person B regardless of his apprentaceship.
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