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Old 05-21-2014, 05:23 PM   #21
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There are parts replacers and there are gunsmiths.
All gunsmiths make most of their money as 'parts replacers'. Look at the big shops like Wilson Combat they are simply 'parts replacers'. Their made their business by taking a plain 1911 and replacing the parts to make it better (or different). Many people think there are only gun hacks or there are custom gun builders. When in reality there are very very few real custom gun builders. Those that do that only produce one or two a year. Are you going to make a living doing that? Not very likely. A real gunsmith repairs guns and that most often means being a 'parts replacer'. Or someone comes in and wants their gun 'customized'. This most often means replacing parts. When I was gunsmithing I liked the chance to do some real custom work but I had to pay the bills and the bulk of the work I got was fixing guns (usually changing parts) and adding/exchanging parts to slightly customize. Now days most people can do their own gun work. There are specialty tools, jigs, and fixtures that are easily purchased by anyone and make many jobs easy and very hard to screw up. There are youtube videos and exploded views and take down guides easily found on the internet by anyone that tell you exactly how to do everything step by step. When I was gunsmithing we often had to make our own tools and jigs. Any information we needed could only be found in the few books available and 90% of the time you had to figure everything out yourself.
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Old 05-21-2014, 05:33 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by John_Deer View Post
There are parts replacers and there are gunsmiths. A gunsmith has the tools and equipment to do jobs quickly and professionally. He does everything possible to eliminate errors. A parts replacer sits there with a hammer and dremel tool screwing up peoples stuff. I can't even say what would happen if I caught a gunsmith beating on my sights with a hammer. If a hammer and a dremel tool was all that is required I wouldn't use a gunsmith. I have my own hammer and dremel tool.
You'd probably hate to sit and watch some well known 1911 gunsmiths. They use hammers a lot. Staking sights, staking plunger tubes to frames, fitting slide rails (not a gentle process for match guns), old school stippling with a punch and hammer. The process can be as hard to watch, as orthopedic surgery, but the results from skilled hands are rewarding.

As hiWall said, the hands of the weilder can make a big difference in the results obtained from the tools. Hammers, can do sight removal flawlessly in the right hands. They can drive engraving tools, and checkering tools.

When I recommended milling machines I wasn't refering to CNC, but to standard milling machines that can obtain good centricity for match crowning, concentric threading for fitting muzzle devices, and other "standard fare" for some gunsmith.
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Old 05-21-2014, 06:16 PM   #23
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I stopped watching at the point that he"checked to see if the gun was still loaded, Drinking beer while working on a Gun ( Facepalm, shaking head)..
Not that I drink that much either, but I sure as heck would not be doing anything that required concentration while imbibing,...That is a recipe for Trouble waiting to happen. And the genius who brought him the gun loaded is another Darwin Award winner....


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Old 05-21-2014, 07:24 PM   #24
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That video was done as a spoof/joke I'm sure, but the scary thing is it's not too far off the mark in real life at times. These guys also have a video somewhere showing a huge glass jar that they keep behind the counter. It is filled with a wide variety of different caliber cartridges and shells taken out of "unloaded" guns that people have brought into their shop.

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Old 05-21-2014, 10:04 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by John_Deer View Post
A professional gunsmith very seldom uses a dremel tool. If they do use a dremel tool it is to repair or replace hand fitted screws. They do not use a dremel tool to smooth parts or change the angle of part. If they round off a sear their grandchildren will be paying off the resulting lawsuit.

Here is what a gunsmith uses.
http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-tools-supplies/general-gunsmith-tools/trigger-job-tools/stoning-fixtures/series-ii-stoning-fixture-prod9875.aspx
i own a Dremel tool and know how to use one and when to use one and when not to use one. now i am not a gunsmith by any means, but have been using all types of various tools for many years and do about 95% of all my own gun repairs and modifications and have for several years now.

one of the things i have learned over the years is to learn your own limitations based on the knowledge or the equipment you have at your disposal. there are many jobs i am capable of doing if i had the specialized equipment or tools to do that job. but, in reality with guns as with vehicles, unless i plan on doing that job more than once, why invest in such things, when i can spend the money on much more needed things.
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Old 05-22-2014, 02:15 AM   #26
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Sometimes it's about having the right hammer for the right phase of a job.



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Old 05-22-2014, 05:57 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by molonlabexx View Post
I am in training right now with AGI. What I have so far is basic hand tools (gun smith specific not just random screwdrivers),......
Good for you sir! Seriously. Because you obviously know how to take things with a grain of salt. I've seen a good number of those AGI videos and for the life of me, cannot understand why someone like Bob Dunlap with his extensive knowledge of firearms (and you can back me up on this...) advocates using tapered end screwdrivers!
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Old 05-22-2014, 08:07 PM   #28
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Here is a recent video on basic gunsmithing tools.

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Old 05-22-2014, 08:46 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by Highpower View Post
Good for you sir! Seriously. Because you obviously know how to take things with a grain of salt. I've seen a good number of those AGI videos and for the life of me, cannot understand why someone like Bob Dunlap with his extensive knowledge of firearms (and you can back me up on this...) advocates using tapered end screwdrivers!
If you try to take a gun apart with a tapered bit, you need to put the gun and "tools" away... One slip on that head and you strip the screw and that pretty wood stock just got a nice scratch across it.
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Old 05-24-2014, 05:59 PM   #30
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I bought a 42" foredom rotary tool and I use it daily. Hammer & punch set, gunsmithing screwdriver set, vise.


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