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Old 05-21-2014, 02:50 AM   #11
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I can't see any need for a normal gunsmith to have any type of CNC machinery. Not unless that 'smith began specializing in making replacement/modified parts for a few model firearms, and could be guaranteed to sell a few hundred of those unique parts per year. Kind of like Weigand and their scope mounts.
Programming a CNC routine takes a fair amount of time, definitely not worth it for a couple or three parts at a time. More time spent programming than in setting up and machining. I speak from industrial experience.
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Old 05-21-2014, 03:53 AM   #12
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CNC is not necessary UNLESS you work for the armorer and make the replacement parts that you send to shops. Even in that case the company will provide the machinery.
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Old 05-21-2014, 04:28 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by regload View Post
I can't see any need for a normal gunsmith to have any type of CNC machinery. Not unless that 'smith began specializing in making replacement/modified parts for a few model firearms, and could be guaranteed to sell a few hundred of those unique parts per year. Kind of like Weigand and their scope mounts.
Programming a CNC routine takes a fair amount of time, definitely not worth it for a couple or three parts at a time. More time spent programming than in setting up and machining. I speak from industrial experience.
i have to agree. CNC lathes and milling machines can be very expensive and require someone to either input a program or write a program for it to make parts. they are more designed for making huge quanties of parts for mass production.
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Old 05-21-2014, 08:08 AM   #14
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I'm being taught all Phases. At least with my own Lathe and a few smaller machines... I can actually Rebuild. The Stuff they do on "SONS of GUNS " intrigues me. You can get one for as little as $3600. CNC, a very good Friend who did it for a living and now Teaches it, taught me enough. I just need program specs and the materiel and a machine to run it on, even though I don't care for Windows, I can get a Unix compiler and run it on my MAC. Of Course I'd have to get a dedicated MAC to run it.,....


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Old 05-21-2014, 12:35 PM   #15
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Very, very little of the day to day work of a gunsmith even requires a mill or a lathe. For power tools a good drill press and a Dremel are by far the most used. A saw for cutting stocks for recoil pad installs. Even a standard grinder is not used very often. Files are used alot.
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Old 05-21-2014, 01:11 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hiwall View Post
Very, very little of the day to day work of a gunsmith even requires a mill or a lathe. For power tools a good drill press and a Dremel are by far the most used. A saw for cutting stocks for recoil pad installs. Even a standard grinder is not used very often. Files are used alot.
A professional gunsmith very seldom uses a dremel tool. If they do use a dremel tool it is to repair or replace hand fitted screws. They do not use a dremel tool to smooth parts or change the angle of part. If they round off a sear their grandchildren will be paying off the resulting lawsuit.

Here is what a gunsmith uses.
http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-tools-supplies/general-gunsmith-tools/trigger-job-tools/stoning-fixtures/series-ii-stoning-fixture-prod9875.aspx
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Old 05-21-2014, 02:40 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SSGN_Doc View Post
Depends on how deep you want to get.
Bingo!

Asking what tools YOU will need as a gunsmith is like asking how long is a piece of string?

Start with all the basic hand tools already mentioned and work up from there on the specialty tools. I've probably got well over 30K invested in tools and machines already and don't even come close to having all the tools I would need to be able to do every job that walked in the door. But then again I don't have to, because I'm not a professional gunsmith.

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Old 05-21-2014, 02:49 PM   #18
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I listed Dremel on purpose to bring out the computer gunsmiths. The uses for a dremel in gunsmithing are limitless.
People who say "Never use a Dremel" are just like anti-gun zealots who say that no one should have a gun because some wacko used one incorrectly. A Dremel is simply a tool. I have seen many many guns damaged by hammers that were used to remove or slide over sights. Does that mean hammers are the sign of a poor gunsmith?
What you do with the tools you have makes you a real gunsmith or not.
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Old 05-21-2014, 03:13 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hiwall View Post
I listed Dremel on purpose to bring out the computer gunsmiths. The uses for a dremel in gunsmithing are limitless.
People who say "Never use a Dremel" are just like anti-gun zealots who say that no one should have a gun because some wacko used one incorrectly. A Dremel is simply a tool. I have seen many many guns damaged by hammers that were used to remove or slide over sights. Does that mean hammers are the sign of a poor gunsmith?
What you do with the tools you have makes you a real gunsmith or not.
There are parts replacers and there are gunsmiths. A gunsmith has the tools and equipment to do jobs quickly and professionally. He does everything possible to eliminate errors. A parts replacer sits there with a hammer and dremel tool screwing up peoples stuff. I can't even say what would happen if I caught a gunsmith beating on my sights with a hammer. If a hammer and a dremel tool was all that is required I wouldn't use a gunsmith. I have my own hammer and dremel tool.
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Old 05-21-2014, 04:13 PM   #20
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I had a pristine 80 series Colt 1911 destroyed by a "professional" gunsmith at a local gun shop years ago. I took it in to have a set of Bo-Mar sights installed. Three months later I went to pick it up and my heart sank into my stomach. It looked like they cut the new dovetail in the slide with a dull wood rasp. Huge crooked gaps between the cuts and the rear sight body. To top it off the firing pin safety plunger spring was sticking out of the slide! They cut right through the plunger bore.

I ended up having to file a lawsuit against them to recover my losses, and about a year later the place went under. Apparently it was a common occurrence for them. Having an FFL does not a gunsmith make...

Since then I've done all my own work. I have Dremel tools. I have Foredom tools. The trick is to know how, when and where to use them - and when NOT to use them. This ain't rocket surgery.

Now THIS guy on the other hand.....

http://smg.photobucket.com/user/Highpwr/media/Various%20Videos/Gunsmithin.mp4.html

Last edited by Highpower; 05-21-2014 at 04:20 PM.
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