Fire lapping and cryo-treatment
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Old 08-15-2014, 04:59 AM   #1
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Default Fire lapping and cryo-treatment

Just another way to separate a fool and his money?

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Old 08-15-2014, 06:15 AM   #2
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And just why would you have that opinion?

There are many shooters that have positive results with both processes. I'm a firm believer in the fire lapping process on barrels that have bad tooling marks in the bore.
My Savage 110 FLP 25/06 had one of the worst barrels that I've ever seen.It shot patterns not groups when it was brand new,and would copper foul so bad in a few shots that it would take days to clean the copper out of it. I hand lapped the barrel twice with very little improvement,it would only shoot 100 grain bullets after that.
I fire lapped it as a last resort before tossing the factory barrel,and that brought the rifle alive. It is a fantastic shooting rifle now.



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Old 08-15-2014, 06:42 AM   #3
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I was reading about both processes and they sounded too good to be true.
That's one yea on barrel lapping.

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Old 08-15-2014, 07:22 AM   #4
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I used a Krieger stainless heavy contour barrel when building my match AR. It was double cryo treated. Once before contouring the blank, and once again after. All Krieger barrels are hand lapped. The gun shoots better than I can is all I can say. How much (if any) of that can be contributed to the cryo process, I can't say.

I also built a 1903A3 rifle using a NOS, short chambered, 2-groove Remington barrel that was still in the wrapper. After cleaning the barrel of all cosmoline and inspecting the bore, I was shocked to find rifling grooves that looked like they were cut with a dull butter knife.

Horrible rough chatter marks that would shred a cleaning patch to bits when passed through the barrel. I spent quite a bit of time hand lapping the barrel until it was slick as snot. It's the best shooting 1903 I own. Go figure.

Fire lapping can help, but it all depends on the condition of the bore that you have to start with. It's not going to bring a worn out barrel back to life.

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Old 08-15-2014, 07:32 AM   #5
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Quote:
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Fire lapping can help, but it all depends on the condition of the bore that you have to start with. It's not going to bring a worn out barrel back to life.
I thought that was the purpose?
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Old 08-15-2014, 12:55 PM   #6
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Worn barrel means oversized bore. Lapping- by hand, machine, fire or tongue- wears away material. Your oversized bore becomes even more oversize.

However, if you have a good but ROUGH bore, It can help smooth the bore. Not a fix all for all problems.

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Old 08-15-2014, 03:58 PM   #7
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My rra national match ar15a2 uses a cryo treated wilson arms barrel it shoots rings around every other rifle i have. I run it open sights and its a submoa rifle out to 300yards.

Cryo wont make a shoddy barrel better but what it does do is stress relief a barrel allowing repeated shots to poa as the barrel heats up. It decreases poi shift from heat in a properly constructed barrel.

Your average remington is going to see no benefit from the process. Taking a barrel off a rifle to have it cryo treated is probably not going to help. I wouodnt go out of my way to have it done as only the barrel maker knows if the composition of their barrels will benefit from the process or not.

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Old 08-15-2014, 07:40 PM   #8
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Metals contain internal stresses because of the way the raw material is formed through rollers or extrusion dies. Especially on the surface. If you remove a good portion of material from one side of a piece of cold rolled steel bar stock for example, the rest of the bar can warp like a banana.

Now imagine having a raw barrel blank that has been bored though perfectly straight and true. Then you begin to remove the outer surface of the steel barrel blank in order to obtain a particular profile to fit the rifles stock. The stresses give way, the steel moves, and your perfectly straight bore is no longer straight. That is why barrel manufacturers have machinery to "straighten" barrels.

Using cryogenics helps to reduce those residual stresses and helps to control unwanted movement of the material. The type of material used, and the order in which machining operations are done all play a part in how well well a barrel will hold it's proper "shape" through a range of temperatures.

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Old 08-15-2014, 08:22 PM   #9
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Wow, I never run across services that actually work. Maybe I shouldn't be so skeptical.

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Old 08-15-2014, 09:05 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Highpower View Post
I used a Krieger stainless heavy contour barrel when building my match AR. It was double cryo treated. Once before contouring the blank, and once again after. All Krieger barrels are hand lapped. The gun shoots better than I can is all I can say. How much (if any) of that can be contributed to the cryo process, I can't say.

I also built a 1903A3 rifle using a NOS, short chambered, 2-groove Remington barrel that was still in the wrapper. After cleaning the barrel of all cosmoline and inspecting the bore, I was shocked to find rifling grooves that looked like they were cut with a dull butter knife.

Horrible rough chatter marks that would shred a cleaning patch to bits when passed through the barrel. I spent quite a bit of time hand lapping the barrel until it was slick as snot. It's the best shooting 1903 I own. Go figure.

Fire lapping can help, but it all depends on the condition of the bore that you have to start with. It's not going to bring a worn out barrel back to life.
Highpower, i understand cryo-treatment and have heard of fire-lapping, but could you go into some detail on how fire-lapping is done?
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