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-   -   Deactivated weapons made to fire? (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f33/deactivated-weapons-made-fire-2068/)

Bolt Action 09-29-2007 01:49 PM

Deactivated weapons made to fire?
 
Is it possible to fix a deactivated weapon so it can fire again?
I've heard that "Deactivation" in some weapons consists of using a cutting torch to cut a slit in the breach...is this fixable?

deadin 09-29-2007 03:38 PM

With a good machine shop, most anything is possible. Including 20 years in a Federal pen.

matt g 09-29-2007 06:29 PM

You could very easily clean the edges of the hole with a file or grinder, then weld it back up and machine it flush. It would be important to keep the alloys near identical to ensure consistent expansion and pressure tolerances. It would also be very important to get the proper paperwork and permits to avoid prison time. It usually isn't worth the time and effort because you can probably purchase the weapon in non-demilled form with the proper paperwork.

deadin 09-29-2007 07:47 PM

Before we get too far into legalities on this issue, are you talking about a deactivated full auto or just a dewat'ed semi-auto, repeater or such?

matt g 09-30-2007 05:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by deadin (Post 9024)
Before we get too far into legalities on this issue, are you talking about a deactivated full auto or just a dewat'ed semi-auto, repeater or such?

Wouldn't that also require similar paperwork, or would that just be repairing a damaged firearm?

deadin 09-30-2007 05:41 AM

One would be "making" a full auto which requires all kind of paperwork, if possible at all with a dewat. I would imagine you would need a manufacturers license at the very least. It couldn't be put on the "Register"
The other would, at the most, be "making" a regular firearm which is legal for personal use. You just couldn't dispose (sell, give away, etc.) of it.

All this said, once a torch has hit the receiver, unless you are an expert metallurgist, getting the temper/hardness back to where it should be would be a real pain.

matt g 09-30-2007 08:07 AM

You really would need to be an expert metallurgist, welder and machinist.

deadin 09-30-2007 03:14 PM

Well, maybe you wouldn't need to be that expert as long as you have a good medical plan and wouldn't miss an eye or finger or hand, etc.:eek: :D

Bolt Action 09-30-2007 04:40 PM

I'm talking about a Semi-Automatic Rifle,I'm not sure how it's been deactivated,but before I order it (Tokarev-SVT-40) I want to know if it can be repaired or not,in a worse case scenario

deadin 09-30-2007 06:03 PM

Quote:

in a worse case scenario
Probably not succesfully. I've seen deactivations where the barrel is welded shut and then welded to the receiver. Then the face of the bolt is cut off. I even saw a Reising where the entire ejection port was welded shut.


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