Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > Gunsmithing & Do-It-Yourself Projects > Gunsmithing Forum > Crescent SXS Shotgun Restoration.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-04-2012, 03:49 AM   #11
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
BillM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Amity
Posts: 959
Liked 176 Times on 94 Posts
Likes Given: 11

Default

It is chambered for the old 2 9/16" 16 ga ammo. If you shoot
2 3/4" in it you will get increased pressure. 2 9/16" ammo is available,
but it's not cheap.

I've got the twin to your gun, but mine is complete. A little more scratched
up, but good and tight. Non damascus barrels, I've had it throated for
2 3/4" ammo. Still worth about what I have in it---$75.

Crescent (and later Crescent/Davis) made a bajillion shotguns under about
as many names. They were cheap guns when new---and time has done
nothing to increase their value. By all means have fun with working on
it. Learn some new skills---rust blueing isn't hard, and complex gun parts
have been made with simple hand tools for hundreds of years. Just don't
expect to ever get out of it what you put in.

Try Numrich (gunpartscorp) and Hoosier Gun Works for parts.

__________________
BillM is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2012, 06:08 AM   #12
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Reno,Texas
Posts: 10,211
Liked 6542 Times on 3633 Posts
Likes Given: 27929

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mountainman13 View Post
Make damn sure its not damascus before you shoot it
It's not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BillM View Post
It is chambered for the old 2 9/16" 16 ga ammo. If you shoot
2 3/4" in it you will get increased pressure. 2 9/16" ammo is available,
but it's not cheap.

I've got the twin to your gun, but mine is complete. A little more scratched
up, but good and tight. Non damascus barrels, I've had it throated for
2 3/4" ammo. Still worth about what I have in it---$75.

Crescent (and later Crescent/Davis) made a bajillion shotguns under about
as many names. They were cheap guns when new---and time has done
nothing to increase their value. By all means have fun with working on
it. Learn some new skills---rust blueing isn't hard, and complex gun parts
have been made with simple hand tools for hundreds of years. Just don't
expect to ever get out of it what you put in.

Try Numrich (gunpartscorp) and Hoosier Gun Works for parts.
Thanks for the advice. Should shotguns parts from the same time periods be interchangeable even if it is a different brand (made by basically the same people though)

I tried numrich some time ago and they had the parts listed (for a pretty high price concidering the value of the gun), but none were in stock. I'll try hoosier though.

Thanks for the tip on the ammo too.
__________________
texaswoodworker is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2012, 10:21 AM   #13
10-32
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
mountainman13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 11,525
Liked 2910 Times on 1715 Posts

Default

Dixie gun works might have something. Worth checking out.

__________________

I don't need No stinking signature.

mountainman13 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2012, 02:55 AM   #14
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
BillM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Amity
Posts: 959
Liked 176 Times on 94 Posts
Likes Given: 11

Default

Dug mine out of the safe and compared it to your pictures. Mine says
"New York Gun Co." on it----but it's the same model as yours. If it would
help, I can take some pix of the fore-end iron, extractor etc. on mine
so you will at least know what it's supposed to look like.

__________________
BillM is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2012, 05:33 PM   #15
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Bracebridge,Ontario
Posts: 426
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hiwall View Post
The curved piece is often called the forearm iron. Rust blue is done by letting the gun rust then carding off the rust then letting gun rust then carding off the rust, again and again to reach the preferred blue color. Rust blue is expensive to have done. A good cold blue is Oxpho Blue from Brownells but there are others also. With most cold blues prep is the key. I doubt that you will ever find that exact parts so someone will have to make or adapt available parts.
after ech time it is rusted you have to boil the part in distilled water to turn the red rust Fe2o3 to blue or black Fe3o4.
__________________

Thats why they call it hunting and not grocery shopping

Fisherking is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Firearms Forum Replies Last Post
J. Stevens 410 Shotgun Stock Restoration vmkeith Engraving & Refinishing 7 12-17-2011 03:14 AM
Gun Restoration SwampDonkey Gunsmithing Forum 10 06-08-2011 10:19 PM
Gun Restoration suggestions? Mandy The Club House 1 05-14-2011 07:22 PM
old revolver restoration ta1588 Gunsmithing Forum 6 04-29-2010 01:14 AM
restoration 2506imp Gunsmithing Forum 5 11-10-2009 12:46 PM



Newest Threads