Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > Gunsmithing & Do-It-Yourself Projects > Gunsmithing Forum > Crescent SXS Shotgun Restoration.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-22-2012, 07:33 PM   #1
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Reno,Texas
Posts: 10,211
Liked 6559 Times on 3635 Posts
Likes Given: 27929

Default Crescent SXS Shotgun Restoration.

Well, I started a thread on this same subject a long time ago (it was the first thread I started if I recall), but I want to actually be able to use this thing, so here we go again.

The gun is a Crescent SXS Shotgun chambered in 16 GA. I do not know what model it is, but it has exposed hammers on it. The barrel has no markings on it at all (we had to test fit different GA until we found one that fit. 12GA was too big, 20 Ga was to small, 16 Ga was just right).

Anyway, it has several parts missing from it. The entire fore arm assembly is gone (including the piece that has a circular cove cut into it and fits against the end of the reciever), a spring for a hammer is missing, the firing pins are free floating (I don't know if they had springs origionally, but if they did, their gone), and the entire extractor is gone (plate, spring, and anything else I'm not aware of)

I cannot find these parts anywhere. Should I have them custom made? Where could I have that done, I don't even know what many of these parts looked like.

If I get that problem solved, how should I refinish it. The cold blue works, but is not very attractive. Should I just have it parkerized, or something else (I want the gun to look as origional as possible. So I want it a really deep blue with maybe some gloss to it)

Oh, and finally, the gun was made before the mid 1930s (that is when Crescent was bought buy savage/stevens (I think). There was an old scrap of paper that was between the stock and the buttplate that was dated 1902 (I think, I'll have to check). The barrel is not damascus, or twisted metal, I think it was solid. Would this gun be safe to fire? Should I just use reduced loads or black powder loads, or should most modern ammo be fine?

For everyone that thinks I ruined an old gun by refinishing it, the gun was covered in thick rust when I got it (mostly surface rust, there is only a little pitting), I'm just giving it a new life. Plus the gun is not very collectible, and worth very little money even in decent condition.
I'll post some pics of the guns, and it's parts when I get home. Thanks.

This is what it looks like. (this is not mine though)

__________________

Last edited by texaswoodworker; 02-22-2012 at 07:40 PM.
texaswoodworker is offline  
 
Reply With Quote

Join FirearmsTalk.com Today - It's Free!

Are you a firearms enthusiast? Then we hope you will join the community. You will gain access to post, create threads, private message, upload images, join groups and more.

Firearms Talk is owned and operated by fellow firearms enthusiasts. We strive to offer a non-commercial community to learn and share information.

Join FirearmsTalk.com Today! - Click Here


Old 02-22-2012, 07:45 PM   #2
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
hiwall's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Cleator,AZ
Posts: 3,259
Liked 698 Times on 448 Posts
Likes Given: 226

Default

"I cannot find these parts anywhere. Should I have them custom made? Where could I have that done"

Any gunsmith should be able to make or adapt available parts.

__________________

Just walking on the edge of of my grave.

hiwall is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2012, 07:49 PM   #3
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
hiwall's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Cleator,AZ
Posts: 3,259
Liked 698 Times on 448 Posts
Likes Given: 226

Default

They usually do not hot blue doubles. Rust blue or cold blue.

__________________

Just walking on the edge of of my grave.

hiwall is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2012, 08:54 PM   #4
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Reno,Texas
Posts: 10,211
Liked 6559 Times on 3635 Posts
Likes Given: 27929

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hiwall View Post
"I cannot find these parts anywhere. Should I have them custom made? Where could I have that done"

Any gunsmith should be able to make or adapt available parts.
I don't know of any gunsmiths around me (there probably are, I just don't know who they are or where they are at), but I'll look around.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hiwall View Post
They usually do not hot blue doubles. Rust blue or cold blue.
What is rust blue? how hard/expensive is it to do? What kind of cold blue is good for this? the stuff I used turned the metal a greenish blue color. (it was birchwood casey perma blue paste)
__________________
texaswoodworker is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2012, 11:46 PM   #5
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Reno,Texas
Posts: 10,211
Liked 6559 Times on 3635 Posts
Likes Given: 27929

Default

Here are some pics of it.

pic 1-sorry about it being a crappy pic. The forestock assembly is completely gone, so is that piece that fits around the cuved dge of the reciever (I do not knows what that is called)

pic 2-the reciever says Crescent Fire Arms Co. Norwich Conn. USA. That is all it says on the gun. It does not say a model or anything else.

pic 3-bottom of the barrel where the forearm assembly goes.

pic 4-that is what the missing spring looks like.

pic 5-missing extractor

It is also missing the springs to the fireing pins.

100_1861-edit.jpg   100_1864.jpg   100_1865.jpg   100_1867-edited.jpg   100_1869.jpg  

__________________
texaswoodworker is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2012, 12:03 AM   #6
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
hiwall's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Cleator,AZ
Posts: 3,259
Liked 698 Times on 448 Posts
Likes Given: 226

Default

The curved piece is often called the forearm iron. Rust blue is done by letting the gun rust then carding off the rust then letting gun rust then carding off the rust, again and again to reach the preferred blue color. Rust blue is expensive to have done. A good cold blue is Oxpho Blue from Brownells but there are others also. With most cold blues prep is the key. I doubt that you will ever find that exact parts so someone will have to make or adapt available parts.

__________________

Just walking on the edge of of my grave.

hiwall is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2012, 01:44 AM   #7
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Reno,Texas
Posts: 10,211
Liked 6559 Times on 3635 Posts
Likes Given: 27929

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hiwall View Post
The curved piece is often called the forearm iron. Rust blue is done by letting the gun rust then carding off the rust then letting gun rust then carding off the rust, again and again to reach the preferred blue color. Rust blue is expensive to have done. A good cold blue is Oxpho Blue from Brownells but there are others also. With most cold blues prep is the key. I doubt that you will ever find that exact parts so someone will have to make or adapt available parts.
Thanks for the advice on the blue. Well, I looked and there are a few gunsmiths around here, but I have never heard anything about any of them. (plus, a lot of people around here like to try to overcharge you ) I'll check them out and get an estimate, but I may see if one of the gunsmiths here could help me out.
__________________
texaswoodworker is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2012, 01:59 PM   #8
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
TheOldMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Warner Robins,Georgia
Posts: 993
Liked 27 Times on 22 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hiwall View Post
Rust blue is done by letting the gun rust then carding off the rust then letting gun rust then carding off the rust, again and again to reach the preferred blue color. Rust blue is expensive to have done. A good cold blue is Oxpho Blue from Brownells but there are others also. With most cold blues prep is the key. I doubt that you will ever find that exact parts so someone will have to make or adapt available parts.
Rust blueing can be done by the home hobbiest with minimal expense to you. Most of the expense is in the amount of time it takes to get the desired finish. As hiwall suggests, the Oxpho Blue from Brownells is a good product that I've used many times with very nice results. Older shotguns like yours "were" most likely rust blued and brownells sells a rust blue sollution also.

It's always nice to see someone take on restoration projects like this. IMO, guns deserve to be restored to their former glory whenever possible. As a side note, check VERY closely at the steel of the barrels to determine what they're made of.. I just completed the restoration of a Colt 1883 double that showed very little signs of having damascus barrels even though Colt made nothing but damascus doubles. It took me looking at it under magnification after removing the old finish to finally see the pattern. Just an FYI
__________________

NRA Life Member

" Guns have only two enemies: RUST & POLITICIANS"

"Free men do not ask permission to bear arms"

The U.S. Constitution: The 2nd Amendment is in place in case the Poloticians ignore the others"


Last edited by TheOldMan; 02-24-2012 at 02:03 PM.
TheOldMan is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2012, 04:11 PM   #9
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Reno,Texas
Posts: 10,211
Liked 6559 Times on 3635 Posts
Likes Given: 27929

Default

Thanks for the advice, I think it isn't demascus, but I'll be sure to check again.

__________________
texaswoodworker is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2012, 03:08 AM   #10
10-32
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
mountainman13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 11,525
Liked 2917 Times on 1718 Posts

Default

Make damn sure its not damascus before you shoot it

__________________

I don't need No stinking signature.

mountainman13 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Firearms Forum Replies Last Post
J. Stevens 410 Shotgun Stock Restoration vmkeith Engraving & Refinishing 7 12-17-2011 03:14 AM
Gun Restoration SwampDonkey Gunsmithing Forum 10 06-08-2011 10:19 PM
Gun Restoration suggestions? Mandy The Club House 1 05-14-2011 07:22 PM
old revolver restoration ta1588 Gunsmithing Forum 6 04-29-2010 01:14 AM
restoration 2506imp Gunsmithing Forum 5 11-10-2009 12:46 PM