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-   -   Bedding a Rifle action (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f33/bedding-rifle-action-12688/)

doss 04-08-2009 03:37 PM

Bedding a Rifle action
 
Im kind of a perfectionist and am trying to make my Howa 1500 varmint supreme 22-250 as accurate as possibly can. My question is, is it worth bedding the action, if so what kind of bedding would be best glass or pillar, and about how much should i excpect to spend on gunsmithing. Any input or experience with accuracy difference is greatly appreciated. Thanks

Dillinger 04-08-2009 03:45 PM

Glass bedding is an excellent way to improve accuracy. We do it on every serious rifle that leaves the shop, unless there is a reason the rifle needs pillar bedding. Personally I think pillar bedding is a pain in the rear end, but it's effective as well.

The whole goal of the bedding is to give the action a solid, stable, custom fit place to lay and to free float your barrel in the process. This eliminates outside influences from affecting your shooting, like disruption of barrel harmonics.

We have seen a factory rifle, that was merely glass bedded,had the scope properly mounted & a trigger job, go from 2.0" groups at 100 yards to sub 1" groups with no other changes. I personally believe that glass bedding is a must and have it done on every rifle I have, even on my little Ruger 10/22. :o

In our shop, bedding would cost about $150-$200 depending on specifics of your rifle.

Pillar Bedding I am not an expert on, I usually do some of the glass bedding jobs, so I am not going to step on a land mine and speak to how much better/worse it is than a straight glass bed. I prefer the glass bed, but that is because I can do it myself and have been able to successfully make a rifle shoot better doing it. Pillar Bedding I haven't done any of, that is a job for the Master....

But, Stalkingbear will be along shortly to help answer that question I am sure. He has a ton of experience in that endevour....

Excellent choice for an action by the way. The Howa 1500 is one hell of a good action and very accurate right out of the box...

JD

doss 04-08-2009 04:32 PM

Thanks that helps a lot. Any input on what powder and bullets tend to lend the most accuracy for a 22-250. My father in-law re-loads and i was going to get the supplies to start re-loading and fine tuning my rifle, but i would like a good starting place so i dont have to try a ton of different loads before i find a good one.

Dillinger 04-08-2009 07:05 PM

^^ Sorry brother NOT my area of expertise AT ALL - and I am NOT afraid to admit it... LOL

We have several very good reloaders on here though, and I am sure someone has a pet load they will give up with a little begging. :D

Give the thread a day or so and you should see some other responses. Generally a lot of traffic at night when everyone gets off work....

JD

birgrunar 04-09-2009 07:57 PM

Glass Bedding Rifles.
 
Yes you will increase the accuracy by a great margin.
Lets say your rifle shoots around 1 inch at 100 yds.
Glass bedding (pillar bedding) will shrink the groups down to
1/2 inch at 100 yds.
I offer a Rifle Bedding Book, of how to pillar glass bed rifles.
Available at Custom Tactical Varnmint Rifles,Hunting.Silencer.Glass Bedding.

Sincerely
BRS Custom Rifles


Quote:

Originally Posted by doss (Post 92303)
Im kind of a perfectionist and am trying to make my Howa 1500 varmint supreme 22-250 as accurate as possibly can. My question is, is it worth bedding the action, if so what kind of bedding would be best glass or pillar, and about how much should i excpect to spend on gunsmithing. Any input or experience with accuracy difference is greatly appreciated. Thanks


stalkingbear 04-10-2009 02:18 AM

Basically glass bedding & pillar bedding accomplish the same thing-abeit similar but slightly different methods. Glass bedding forms a skin tight fit between the action, and the stock, and is simply precision fit bedding due to the nature of the resin/hardener combo exactly like epoxy. In fact, a BUNCH of rifles have been bedded with regular epoxy. While glass bedding will USUALLY improve accuracy, the main benefit of glass bedding is consistent zero and when free floated barrel, no chance of stock warpage affecting shift in zero or changing harmonics of the barrel vibrating. I glass bed EVERY rifle I build or accurize as S.O.P.

Pillar bedding does the same thing, but is better because it does not involve the wood whatsoever. the pillar goes from the bottom metal all the way up to cradle the action-full length of the action screws. You cannot squeeze the wood or cause damage overtorquing unless you go crazy and strip the screws or action. In that way, you can precision torque the action screws to exacting torque for the best amount the particular action "wants" for best accuracy. Pillar bedding is somewhat harder to do, but once done, usually results in better bedding than even glass bedding. Sometimes I'll glass bed a rifle, then pillar bed it as required. The important thing to watch when pillar bedding is the I.D. of the pillars vs the O.D. of the action screws-you want enough room but not too loose. When pillar bedding you have to drill the stock slightly larger than the O.D. of the pillars and "notch" or score them for the glass bedding/stock to have a firm hold on them.

I usually charge 90$ to glass bed, and 100$ to pillar bed,and 120$ to do both at the same time. Keep in mind I'm a 1 man shop, and semi-retired so I do it on the days I'm up to it. Remember-I'm just here to help and NOT "drum up business".

Another option is a full length aluminum bedding block. It offers the exact same advantages, but is a lot simpler as the bedding blocks are usually bought already installed in that brand stock that offers them. They are a true drop in stock. For me to do my own bedding block type bedding, I would have to machine them myself, as nobody offers them for sale to my knowledge. Hope that helps? Neil




Quote:

Originally Posted by doss (Post 92303)
Im kind of a perfectionist and am trying to make my Howa 1500 varmint supreme 22-250 as accurate as possibly can. My question is, is it worth bedding the action, if so what kind of bedding would be best glass or pillar, and about how much should i excpect to spend on gunsmithing. Any input or experience with accuracy difference is greatly appreciated. Thanks


Bolosniper 04-10-2009 04:50 PM

I want to add to what Bear has said if I may.

I have also done innumerable glass and pillar bedding jobs over the years, and Bear describes the two bedding processes and their benefits very well, as would be expected. I started using both receiver and barrel bedding block techniques some years ago, and for a field rifle I prefer a receiver bedding block over all of the other receiver bedding processes that are currently in use. The block stiffens the flimsiest part of the stock, and if it is integrated into a full length chassis, the end result is an incredibly stiff platform for the barreled action assembly to mount to.

We use in most of our rifles a synthetic stock of superior grade and lightweight construction materials with a full length aluminum chassis with an integrated receiver bedding block. We bed the receiver into the block with bedding compound, and here is the reason why. The bedding block/chassis assembly is made on CNC equipment, and typically hold tolerances of no more than 0.0005"+/-, and a factory production receiver is manufactured at about 0.005" +/- (I'm being kind here), and then the factory receivers are then heat treated, which warps them. To ensure an absolutely stress free bedding of the receiver, bedding compound must be applied. The block is straighter and stiffer than the receiver body is, and when torqued into the receiver bedding block, the receiver body will be pulled into the shape of the bedding block which will impart all kinds of internal stress into the receiver. If the receiver was blue printed or trued, which is done with the receiver in a "relaxed" state, all of the careful machining done to square up the surfaces pertinent to accuracy will be pulled out of alignment, which nullifies all of that careful machining, and again as stated above, injects internal stress into the action assembly, another accuracy killer. Even with our actions, which are made to the tightest tolerances that can be achieved with today's technology, we bed into the bedding block.


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