Bedding H-S Precision stock recoil lug area
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Old 11-05-2012, 12:15 PM   #1
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Default Bedding H-S Precision stock recoil lug area

I am wanting to bed the recoil lug area of my gun that has the H-S police/sniper stock installed. What bedding material do i use and what is the correct way to bed the recoil lug?

I was looking at Devcon 10210 but im not sure if it will be a permanent bond that will not let me remove the stock if i were to ever have the need? Caliber is 22-250.

Thanks

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Old 11-05-2012, 12:34 PM   #2
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Brownell's Acuraglass is the old stand by for rifle bedding.

http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-tools-supplies/stock-work-finishing/stock-bedding-adhesives/acraglas--prod1033.aspx

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Old 11-05-2012, 01:21 PM   #3
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Ditto on what hiwall suggested. It's all I've ever used. When you bed the recoil lug area you'll need to rough the surface up with a dremel tool or file. Also don't be shy about removing some of the material behind the lug, this gives a thicker layer of bedding compound when you've finished.

This is VERY important what's next. The only area of the lug that should make contact is the backside against the stock. The front, bottom and sides need to have clearance bewteen them and the stock. I do this by applying a couple of layers of black electricians taope to the recoil lug then put a liberal amount of release agent anywhere the compound could touch the metal or that tape.

Also the only permanent bond you'll want is bewteen the bedding compund and the stock. By using the release agent this allows the barreled action to come out after the comound has set up. They're always tight coming out the first time but if you've done it right it will come out. Also be sure to use plenty of masking tape on the outside of the stock so the compound won't stick to it if it runs out, and it will run out.

Here's a video. Kinda vague but it does hit the highpoints.

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Old 11-05-2012, 07:50 PM   #4
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Great, thanks. I had thought I read about what you mentioned with the only part that should make positive contact was the rear face side. Thanks for the confirmation. I'm glad I asked instead of filling the whole recess area with bedding material.

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Old 11-05-2012, 09:38 PM   #5
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Jim1611- i dont think the video came through.

One question i have is does the gun need to be positioned with the muzzle straight up when the filler is applied? From what i am understanding, its on the runny side, so how do i keep it from all running down into the recoil lug recess area of the stock?- Or is the idea to fill the whole recess area with the filler and rely on the layers of tape (with release agent applied) to create the gap between the front, sides, and bottom of the lug that are supposed to not make contact?

If the process gets tricky, can release agent be purchased alone to allow for a putty type of filler that would stay put when applied? Guess im nervous about the glass bed filler being runny and dont want to make a mistake.

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Old 11-05-2012, 11:03 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SEHunter View Post
Jim1611- i dont think the video came through.

One question i have is does the gun need to be positioned with the muzzle straight up when the filler is applied? From what i am understanding, its on the runny side, so how do i keep it from all running down into the recoil lug recess area of the stock?- Or is the idea to fill the whole recess area with the filler and rely on the layers of tape (with release agent applied) to create the gap between the front, sides, and bottom of the lug that are supposed to not make contact?

If the process gets tricky, can release agent be purchased alone to allow for a putty type of filler that would stay put when applied? Guess im nervous about the glass bed filler being runny and dont want to make a mistake.
Sorry about the video.
There's 2 parts to this and you'll see it available after you watch the first one. Here's another one and actually better
it's 2 parts as well.

I keep the stock horizontal. The Acraglass Gel is not very runny. Not having used any others I can't say yea or nay about them but Brownells has been selling this stuff for years and for me it's the gold standard the others are rated by. Yes fill the lug area with the gel and the action will force out what's not needed. It's best to put too much than not enough since needed to add after it's hard is a pain and taking the action out during the process makes quite a mess. To answer your question the lug will make it's own cavity so don't worry about trying to form it before hand, just add the gel and let it form around the action. The best way to look at this is that you need to control where the gel goes and you do that with tape, molding clay and release agent to make sure it comes apart.

After it all cures it's going to come apart hard. I've heard some people say just hit the bottom of the barrel with a block of wood while you hold the stock. Don't do that. Just think what that could do! Crack the stock, if it's wood or even bend the barrel if it's hit hard enough. Mine come apart just by me pulling the barrel away from the stock by hand. I have in some cases put it in the deep freeze after it's hardened and that helps too. Some peolple say pouring very hot water down the barrel works too but I like keeping water out of there.

It's not hard to do if you don't get in a rush and make mistakes. Watch some videos on it and then if you still feel wrong with it have it done by someone that knows how. It sure does help most of the time and it's just standard procedure for my rifles that they get done.
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Old 11-05-2012, 11:07 PM   #7
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Oh and here's a thread I started thinking it might help some that are thinking of doing a bedding job. http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f18/glass-bedding-free-float-not-75736/

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Old 11-06-2012, 02:32 AM   #8
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Thanks- those videos are helpful. With an H-S stock that has the aluminum bedding block, would you say its necessary to carve out any of the area behind the lug, as is recommended with wood stocks?

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Old 11-06-2012, 02:49 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SEHunter View Post
Thanks- those videos are helpful. With an H-S stock that has the aluminum bedding block, would you say its necessary to carve out any of the area behind the lug, as is recommended with wood stocks?
i may be wrong, but i think the other posters might have been thinking you have a regular stock. if that stock has an aluminum bedding block, i doubt glass bedding the action is going to be needed. according to everything i have read about the H-S Precision stocks with the bedding block, only thing required was proper torqueing of the action screws. that was the purpose behind using the bedding block so no glass bedding needed to be used. you might want to check further into this before possibly ruining an expensive stock.
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Old 11-06-2012, 03:15 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by axxe55 View Post
i may be wrong, but i think the other posters might have been thinking you have a regular stock. if that stock has an aluminum bedding block, i doubt glass bedding the action is going to be needed. according to everything i have read about the H-S Precision stocks with the bedding block, only thing required was proper torqueing of the action screws. that was the purpose behind using the bedding block so no glass bedding needed to be used. you might want to check further into this before possibly ruining an expensive stock.
I am aware of his stock axxe55 but thanks for the reminder.

Here was my experience, just the other day. I ordered a Bell and Carlson Medalist for my Weatherby MKV and it's advertised to be a drop in. It's not quite as good a stock as what you bought but it's almost made the same. It has the bedding block. What I found was that when I put the action in the stock it fir okay but the flat surface behind the recoil lug did not touch. That let the action twist after it was seated, but the guard screws stopped that. Still I wanted a better fit. So it's now glass bedded.

As far as removing aluminum. You will need to remove some of the material but leave a small pad so that when you put the action back in for the glass to cure there is some of the original bedding bloc supporting the action. That way it can't go any deeper into the stock that it should.

I do believe, my opinion, that even an aluminum bedded stock will fit better if it's bedded. My work, tool and die trade, is measured every day in less that the thickness of your hair so I'm very aware of machining tolerances. Even as good as some of this stuff is made there are just too many variables for you to be sure the fit is perfect in an aluminum bedded rifle stock. It's nearly impossible for many different manufacturers to be sure everything they make will fit what someone else makes, ie. the rifle action and the stock. You can overcome this variable by bedding the stock to the action.
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