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chlogeo 11-20-2011 10:58 AM

Knife sharping help
 
What am I doing wrong? Every time I sharpen my knife it seems to be sharper on one edge than the other edge. Do they make a Fool Proof knife sharpener for Fools (-;

Jeepergeo 11-20-2011 12:28 PM

If it's a pretty good knife, then the problem is probably technique. Observe your technique carefully, and look to see that you are using the same technique (angles, pressure, burr development and removal, etc.) on both edges.

The Lansky systems help, but do not ensure, similar treatment of both edges. Shop around for these, as the prices vary quite a bit. Lowes was carrying them for awhile, but at about $15 more than on Amazon. Lanskys will give good results time after time. But for the excellent results with effort, I find I get them only using stones and oil.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/...500_AA300_.jpg

trip286 11-20-2011 04:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chlogeo
What am I doing wrong? Every time I sharpen my knife it seems to be sharper on one edge than the other edge. Do they make a Fool Proof knife sharpener for Fools (-;

Get a straight razor, then do some research and learn how to sharpen it. After shaving with it for a while, you learn what sharp means. The skill (art really) will then carry over into all your blades.

Trez 11-20-2011 05:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trip286 (Post 632168)
Get a straight razor, then do some research and learn how to sharpen it. After shaving with it for a while, you learn what sharp means. The skill (art really) will then carry over into all your blades.

So true, sharpening blades is a art... My dad taught me to sharpen blades when I was 6 or 7, (I didnt get a straight razor until I was 16-17) I even held a job sharpening tools..

As for the OP, sure there are sharpeners out there, but nothing compares to a blade sharpened on a stone.. Sounds to me like your either using more pressure on one side or using different angles on each side, causing one side to "roll over" (for lack of a better term...:o)

bkt 11-20-2011 05:25 PM

Are you stropping the blade - both sides - after sharpening? That will take off any edge burrs that may make one side seem more sharp than the other.

chlogeo 11-20-2011 06:33 PM

Thanks mates for the info and please Forgive me for I Know Not What I Do. (-;

culdee 11-20-2011 07:44 PM

Is the blade carbon steel or stainless? If it is stainless you may find that there is a burr on the edge that rolls from side to side depending on which side you stroked last. The only way to get rid of it is to find which side it is on by using your thumb nail, put that side on the stone at a higher angle than before and hopefully break off the burr.

Chainfire 11-20-2011 09:48 PM

Sharpening is a fine art. I am sixty, and have tried all my life to sharpen, free-handed on a stone and failed miserably.

There are some good cheating tools that keep my knife sharp enough to take the hair off my arm. (my test) The Lansky system mentioned above is a good tool, so is the Smith's precision sharpening kit. (about $40.00 and worth every penny) Also there is a "gimmic" sharpener that you can pick up in the sporting goods section of walmart. This is a small yellow plastic (Smith) sharpening tool with carbide steel on one side and ceramic on the other. This works well on a knife that hasn't had the original edge ruined. This tool sells for under $5.00. Don't bother with any powered sharpener they just grind a knife to death. Most of the elaborate sharpeners you see at gun shows aren't worth a damn.

If you find someone who can teach you to use a stone properly that is the way to go.

trip286 11-20-2011 09:57 PM

The little tool that chainfire mentions is perfectly fine for keeping a knife cutting sharp.

A lot of folks like to use diamond sharpeners too. Personally, I stay the hell away from diamond unless I'm working on a machete or ax. It's just too aggressive.

A good stone and an old belt. Some never pick up the technique. I've always been able to get a knife "sharp enough" but when I started using a straight razor, I learned that when it comes down to it, I kind of sucked at it. It took quite a bit of research, trial and error with different techniques, and almost a solid year of hard work to really find my groove.

I let a friend of mine handle my KBar a while back. He lost the very tips of 2 fingers and didn't even feel it. About an 1/8 to just less than 1/4 inch worth of middle and ring finger.

Gordo323 11-21-2011 03:38 AM

http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f12/ftf-bushcraft-school-30313/index13.html

Learned all I needed to know in this post.

franciscomv knows knives!


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