How do you sharpen and take care of your knife?
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Old 11-04-2009, 11:37 PM   #1
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Default How do you sharpen and take care of your knife?

I have a few folding knifes and a butterfly one I play with. A couple could used a sharpening. How do u sharpen them? I have an old iron filer used for tools n stuff, I don't know what else to use and rather not spend much for that.

Also how do u protect them from deteriorating, wd40?

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Old 11-04-2009, 11:46 PM   #2
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How much are you willing to spend to have a hair shaving edge Hindu??

Because you can get a Lansky Sharpener for as cheap as $20 for a core system.

No, that is not the system that I currently use. I have an Edge Pro APEX and it's the greatest system I have ever used, but it's MUCH more expensive.

Both systems feature the same type of controlled, stone across the blade way of sharpening. Much better than trying to use a flat stone and holding the knife at the exact same angle for the time of the sharpening. Not easy!

For a very basic edge, one that will shave hair, the Lansky is a great system. I wouldn't put it against the APEX, but for the price difference, you can mess up a couple of blades and still recover...

JD

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Old 11-05-2009, 02:27 AM   #3
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I want that edge pro. but all I have is a basic old Arkansas 2 sided wet stone.

Arkansas Knife Sharpening Stones Arkansas Natural Arkansas Stones

Bench Stones Pocket Stones Sharpening Bench Pocket Stones

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Old 11-05-2009, 02:38 AM   #4
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Smith two sided Hard/Soft Arkansas stone and since I have it for my Katana, clove oil for the blades!!

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Old 11-05-2009, 04:19 PM   #5
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I don't like Lanskies or other similar guided systems. If the edge angle on your knife is different from the angles offered by the sharpener, it takes a lot of work to get it to the same angle. Besides, it doesn't work on convex edges (most of my fixed blades are convex, like God and Bill Moran intended).

Learning to sharpen freehand is the best. Spend your money on quality stones, not on weird sharpening gigs. Good stones are pricey, but they'll last a lifetime. For my flat and hollow ground knives, I use Spyderco benchstones. They are pretty good and cost around $40 each, which isn't that bad considering the excellent quality you get. They're ceramic, need no lubricants (you just scrub them with a brush under the tap after using them). I'm in love with the ultra-fine grit one, it gives me a really nice polish on my edges. I carry the smaller Spyderco Pro-File stones when traveling.

For my convex knives, I use wet/dry sandpaper backed with either rubber (old mouse pads) or leather, depending on how soft I need it to be. I start with 600 grit if the knife is really dull, and bring it up to 1500/2000 grit for a high polish finish.

As a final step, I strop all my knives on a charged leather strop (leather with a bit of fine buffing compound). This gives me a mirror polished edge that really bites into anything.

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Old 11-05-2009, 06:50 PM   #6
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Cheapo ceramic sharpers work well for me. They're really simple to use, so you can whip it out of the junk drawer and run the blade through it a dozen times every few days. They don't eat the blade as much as stones do either.

As far as protection, I use a light coat of gun oil on the hinge and blade.

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Old 11-06-2009, 02:48 AM   #7
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I missed the part about maintenance. The best I've found so far is food grade mineral oil (it's sold at drugstores since it's used as a laxative). It's cheap, and it's OK to use on blades that will be cutting food.

For long term storage, I use Renaissance Wax. It's fantastic. Here's some info about it: Renaissance Wax - Custom Knives - Knife

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Old 11-06-2009, 02:55 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Franciscomv View Post
I don't like Lanskies or other similar guided systems. If the edge angle on your knife is different from the angles offered by the sharpener, it takes a lot of work to get it to the same angle.
That is where the Edge Pro system shines. You have a 6 or 8 inch upright tower that has infinite adjustments for sharpening. It truly is a step ahead for knife sharpening.

I will agree that sharpening convex knifes is much harder with this system, but it is not impossible.

All the styles mentioned are valid, but using a stone is MUCH harder then using a set system to get started in sharpening.

JD
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Old 11-06-2009, 01:39 PM   #9
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I use the crossed ceramic sticks. Not only is the angle preset and thus idiot resistant, but also both sides are sharpened equally as you go. With crossed sticks all you have to do is slide the blade on each side, like you're trying to carve a thin slice off the stick, alternating every time to change sides. Just be sure to keep the blade vertical and at 90 degrees to the sticks and it's foolproof.

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Old 11-06-2009, 09:17 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dillinger View Post
All the styles mentioned are valid, but using a stone is MUCH harder then using a set system to get started in sharpening.

JD
You're right about the Edge Pro and you're right about freehand sharpening being harder to learn. However, I still think it's the superior method. You can use cheap kitchen knives to practice, it just takes a little patience.

I've tried most of the sharpening jigs out there (I've got a 4 meter X 5 meter room in my house dedicated exclusively to my knife collection), they all ended up collecting dust in a drawer. Most of my real knife use is outdoors, it's much easier to carry a fine grit stone, a leather strop or some folded sandpaper than something like a Sharpmaker, a Lansky or Edge Pro.

Freehand sharpening is a useful skill, being independent form those complicated sharpening systems means you can sink all the money into quality stones and with practice the results are fantastic. The grind or shape of the knife won't matter either (ever tried sharpening a kerambit or khukri on something like a Lansky?).

About convex knives, all these fixed angle jigs will mess up a well executed convex grind. Mike Stewart (from Bark River, former vp of Marble's) who knows a thing or two about convex blades, recommends the simple and inexpensive rubber backed sandpaper method. Granted, the very edge can be resharpened on a stone (Ed Fowler uses a simple stone) this will eventually create problems (which are beyond the scope of the op's question), to take true advantage of the grind there's nothing like the sandpaper method.

I will conceede a couple of things:
1- Perhaps 95% of the knives people use daily can be easily sharpened with one of these various jigs. That combined with quality modern steels with good edge holding qualities means that the average user will actually need to do very little sharpening to keep his tools in working order.
2- I'm not the average knife user, "sharp" means a different thing to me than to most people. I even do stupid things like take part in cutting competitions every month. I LIKE sharpening and will spend hours getting the edge of my knife to the precise angle and polish I want.

But I'm still convinced that anybody willing to practice can do anything those sharpening jigs can do, and more.
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