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Old 08-18-2012, 03:59 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yunus
Thanks for the quick replies. I'll check out the link and look up some real costs for the supplies.

My guess is that because I use common calibers that the ammo on the shelves is cheap enough that it's going to take a long time to pay for equipment costs. If I shot 10mm then it would pay for itself quickly but I can get .45 for $.40 a round, if doing it myself costs $.35 then it's not worth the time.
But the stuff you load will be top quality for the about the same price as the cheapest stuff you can get!
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Old 08-18-2012, 04:53 AM   #12
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I reload 45 ACP for $16.5/100 rounds and 9mm for $13.40/100 rounds.

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Old 08-18-2012, 04:58 AM   #13
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I pour lead to make my own bullets. I bought somewhere around 140 pounds of wheel weight alloy for $25. That actually works out to about 25 cents for 50 bullets at 200 grains each. 85 cents worth of powder. Primers are $1.25 for 50. So I can make .45 acp for $2.35 a box. I shoot a lot. I have never bought .45 acp brass.

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Old 08-18-2012, 05:19 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yunus
I shoot .40, .45, .223, .308 calibers for the most part.

Roughly how much does it cost to make a .45 or .223 round and how much time does it take? How much is an initial investment in equipment to be able to reload the 4 calibers mentioned?

I'm trying to consider and weigh the options to determine at what point reloading becomes cost effective.
223 is a cheap round but you can shoot higher quality ammo in that round for roughly the same price.. I got my basic set up and by my calculations I broke even loading 40 cal at about 2000 rounds.. After that now I can reload at about half the price.. But i shoot twice as much.. Personally I enjoy reloading and the knowledge it has given me in the 4 months I have been doing it.. It does save money but learning the art of reloading is reward enough in itself.. I like to reload almost as much as I enjoy shooting
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Old 08-18-2012, 05:32 AM   #15
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Q. When does reloading become cost effective? Ans. A lot sooner than not reloading will become cost effective.

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Old 08-18-2012, 11:31 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rjd3282 View Post
Q. When does reloading become cost effective? Ans. A lot sooner than not reloading will become cost effective.
You hit the nail on the head. Problem solved.
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Old 08-19-2012, 08:40 PM   #17
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Never. Cause you will always be spending money. There really is not a break even point.

a press will last 3 lifetimes. My brother has a press that was passed down from his grandfather still reloading today. So The life of dies if you let them get rusty that is about the only thing that can cause any damage unless you drop them or they are in a fire.

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Old 08-20-2012, 06:11 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yunus View Post
I shoot .40, .45, .223, .308 calibers for the most part.

Roughly how much does it cost to make a .45 or .223 round and how much time does it take? How much is an initial investment in equipment to be able to reload the 4 calibers mentioned?

I'm trying to consider and weigh the options to determine at what point reloading becomes cost effective.
There are several material cost calculators out there that can give you per cartridge cost. What they don't include is your time and initial equipment outlay. If you go beyond the "hobby aspect" of handloading then time spent should be a consideration. Equipment outlay can be controled to a point but ultimately it becomes what you make it..LOL.

Lets say a good start up will be about 800.00 to include your first 1000 rounds of .45acp.

Materials Needed

*Manuals ABC's of reloading is a good start.

* Press For what you laid out above I'd go with a Lee Classic 4 hole Turret press. Reason is it's easy to learn on, and it can produce a fair amount of pistol cartridges per hour. It's faster than a single stage press, and less expensive than a true progressive press. Calibre change over is fast and simple with additional 4 hole turret plate and dies.

Example of press kit https://kempfgunshop.com//index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=shop.f lypage&product_id=630&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid =41&vmcchk=1&Itemid=41



*Press II a simple use single stage should always be present on your bench they will always be useful.

*Beam Scale
*kinetic bullet puller
*Machinists Caliper
*Case trimming system (bottle necks only)
*Case prep tools
*Lube system
*Dies,wrenches, allen, wrenches
*Tumbler
*Load Books
*Numerous odds and ends.
*note taking system
*Quite work area
*Solid work bench
*Trips to the range to work up safe accurate loads for your firearms.

*1K brass
1K bullets
1k primers
enough powder for 1K

This is a primer for thought, there are others with far superior experience than I on this forum when it comes to handcrafting cartridges
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Old 08-21-2012, 03:38 PM   #19
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"Roughly how much does it cost to make a .45 or .223 round and how much time does it take? How much is an initial investment in equipment to be able to reload the 4 calibers mentioned? I'm trying to consider and weigh the options to determine at what point reloading becomes cost effective."

I started loadng in '65, only partly to same money, but figger I should break even any day now; after that I'll be making money! But I haven't yet worked out how many rounds I'll need to crank out in a month to make a living wage!

Your question seems reasonable on its face but it isn't. How much time it takes depends on what tools YOU use, how quickly YOU work, how well set up YOUR work path is and how meticulous YOU are. How much it costs to load a single cartridge is so highly variable according to the components used and where you obtain them that my costs vs. anyone else's are irrelvant. Where/how you get your cases and how long they may last varies tremedously. We don't know what equipment YOU would wish to buy or how much YOU might have to spend to set up a place to work (which can be a big part of the costs) nor at what point YOU would consider reloading worthwhile. Loading becomes 'cost effective' with the first round but it's not free.

With all that said, reloading is a great activity but it's been my advice to anyone looking into it purely to save money to forget it! IMHO, it takes time and money to do so unless your goal is much greater than just to cut costs it's unlikely you would keep it up long enough to break even.

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Old 08-22-2012, 03:09 AM   #20
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I took similar advice. I like to shoot, a lot. Factory ammo was starting to get expensive for the amount I like to shoot. I shoot .45 the most and picked up a Lee anniversary single stage setup for about $100 that had almost everything I needed to start. A set of dies, caliper, digital scale, kinetic bullet puller, reloading manual, another $100. You get the idea, these non expendable items I don't figure in because I can use them for other calibers. I'm getting by at about $13 per 50 rounds but ok getting that down with some other bullet sources. I have more time than money so it works for me and I am tuning a load for USPSA now.

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