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-   -   Turret or Progressive Press? (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f30/turret-progressive-press-61587/)

Axxe55 04-01-2012 01:47 PM

Turret or Progressive Press?
 
i am wanting to expand my reloading to be able to load more pistol calibers faster than what i can with my single stage press. i would like to hear what are the biggest differences you find between a turret press and a progressive press and what your dislikes and likes are. i would like suggestions for a decent quality press without spending an arm and a leg to buy. i would also like your reasons why you chose the one you have and why you like it and why you would or wouldn't recommend it. hopefully in the next month or so, with your help i will make a choice and buy one. thanks to everyone in advance for your help.

Shade 04-01-2012 04:12 PM

First always learn reloading with a single stage press first. Seems you have
done that.

Progressives will provide you highest production rates without a doubt.
I can get between 500 round per hour out of my RCBS Piggyback or
800-1000 rounds an hours with 2 people on my MEC 9000 for 12ga.
shotshells. BTW, I would not recommend the Piggyback it is not stiff
enough except for straight walled pistol cases, which works for me.

Turrets (IMO) are some what faster than batch loading with a single stage.
The time you save is in case/cartridge handling. Maybe 200-250 rounds an
hour with a turret. I have not loaded much with a Turret, but can get 150 in
a good hour out of my single stage with a crimping die step...

Just my 2 cents.

rjd3282 04-01-2012 04:21 PM

I have a Dillon Square Deal B that is almost 25 years old and an RL 550B. The Square deal is a great little press but only does pistol ammo. Of the two I like the 550 better it is a lot more substantial. Dillon is a great company to deal with. I know lots of people think Dillon is pricey but I guess it depends on how you look at. It works and there is a great sales and tech staff that are always glad to help. As lot's of folks are fond of saying, you get what you pay for.

Shade 04-01-2012 04:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rjd3282 (Post 758497)
I have a Dillon Square Deal B that is almost 25 years old and an RL 550B. The Square deal is a great little press but only does pistol ammo. Of the two I like the 550 better it is a lot more substantial. Dillon is a great company to deal with. I know lots of people think Dillon is pricey but I guess it depends on how you look at. It works and there is a great sales and tech staff that are always glad to help. As lot's of folks are fond of saying, you get what you pay for.

My next press will be a Dillon 650 for my .223. Buddy has one and I have
used it, well worth the money, and they are not all that much more.

Sport45 04-02-2012 07:36 AM

I use a progressive (Dillon 550b) for my bulk handgun reloading.

For rifle and magnum handgun I use a turret (Lee Classic or Lyman Spar-T). I don't try to punch those out fast enough to use a turret. Too many steps between stages for that...

Axxe55 04-03-2012 07:00 PM

thanks for the input guys, much appreciated. like i said i will be doing some more research and make a decision soon. i am not looking to turn out hundreds and hundreds of rounds, but would like to be able to do it faster than the single stage i have can do now. so turret or progressive?

Sport45 04-04-2012 09:13 AM

Turret.

More specifically, the Lee Classic Turret and a few extra turrets for it.

OldManMontgomery 04-07-2012 05:38 AM

I have a Dillon XL650 and I load nearly all my handgun and rifle ammo on it. However, it's only convenient and fast AFTER one has developed a load.

I also have a Dillon AT 500 - a stripped down version of the 550 - and it serves as Dillon's answer to the traditional turret press. It does a pretty good job for small lots, experimental (load development) and precise ammo.

Staestc 04-07-2012 11:54 AM

My next setup will be a progressive. I put hornady lock-n-load bushings on all my dies, so swapping dies without adjustments is possible. A turret would make that a bit easier, but not that much I believe. But the sheer speed of a progressive once I have worked up loads I like would be very nice indeed. Of course I have reloaded exactly 40 cartridges on my single stage so far, so what do I know :rolleyes::D

billt 04-07-2012 12:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by axxe55 (Post 758396)
i am wanting to expand my reloading to be able to load more pistol calibers faster than what i can with my single stage press. i would like to hear what are the biggest differences you find between a turret press and a progressive press and what your dislikes and likes are. i would like suggestions for a decent quality press without spending an arm and a leg to buy. i would also like your reasons why you chose the one you have and why you like it and why you would or wouldn't recommend it. hopefully in the next month or so, with your help i will make a choice and buy one. thanks to everyone in advance for your help.

I run both. 2 Dillon progressives and 2 MEC progressive shotshell reloaders, as well as a Redding Turret Press. If you're looking for speed there is no way a turret will keep up with a progressive, simply because it's physically impossible. A turret is somewhat quicker than a single stage, but it is still quite slow by comparison.

The reason is strictly mechanical. With a progressive you are performing multiple tasks at the same time on several different cases at once. A turret works much like a single stage in that you are performing one task at a time on one case. Any speed you pick up comes with the ability to select different dies by indexing the turret. That becomes counter productive in a way, because if you are loading on a single stage and you run many cases through one operation, you are eliminating all of the movement required to index the turret for every operation on each case separately.

I purchased a Turret for my speciality dies. Decapper, ram priming tool, etc. That way I can leave them set up and they are ready when I am. I will sometimes even mount one of my powder measures in it and use it for charging powder if I'm loading several Magnum rifle cases. That way I have a more secure method which eliminates the chance for spilled powder.

If you do decide on a turret press I recommend the Redding T-7 Turret Press. The main reason is strength. The turret itself is large, and it's supported across a larger footprint. This makes for a much stronger set up all around. I've attached a dial indicator with a magnetic base to it and detected zero spring while full length resizing .460 Weatherby brass. The press itself is all ductile cast iron, not Aluminum. It also has a very good, well engineered priming set up. I will sometimes use it for that also.

My Progressives are both Dillon's. A Square Deal which I keep set up for .44 Magnum, and an older Dillon RL-450. It has manual priming and powder charging. While not as fast as the current RL-550 or RL-650, I can still maintain a fast production rate. Both of my shotshell presses are MEC's. A 650, and a 8567 Grabber. The 650 doesn't resize, and the 8567 Grabber does with a split collet resizer. I have 2 because both my wife and I shoot Trap. With both of us on 2 progressive presses we can load enough shells for a tournament in less than 2 hours, once we're up and running.

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