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-   -   saving money with reloading (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f30/saving-money-reloading-2286/)

Felix 10-12-2007 05:56 PM

saving money with reloading
 
Can reloading be cost-effective or in the end do you end up paying the same amount as if you purchased ammo?

Has anyone ever done the meticulous calculations to determine the truth?

Bidah 10-12-2007 11:13 PM

I do not have the cost calculations right now, but yes, I have done them. Of course they change in an upward fashion lately. This is after you have "paid" for the equipment to get you started.

In general, I do not count the cost of brass, for pistols especially, since they can be reloaded so many times that the cost becomes negligible. For rifle, I include it at 1/5th the cost as I usually reload them 5 times.

Here is a very general sampling...

.45acp Lead, round nose... $5/box FMJ $6/box Pay: $11 and $14

.223 Match rounds.. my reloads about $26/100. Buy.. $125/100

-Bidah

1hole 10-13-2007 02:32 AM

Like most "home made" things, the money saved from buying factory stuff vs the cost of the tools and materials to do it yourself depends on how much you actually do it.

If you shoot a couple or three boxes of ammo a year and are happy then don't bother to reload. If you shoot, or want to shoot, more than a couple of hundred rounds a year you will break even in maybe 2-4 years, depending on how elaborate you set up and then it starts to actually save money.

Most of us shoot far more home made than we ever would factory ammo so the money saved is more than spent on components but we have a lot more fun too.

And many of us are low volume shooters who reload for the enjoyment and neither the volume nor savings are not all that important to us. Loading and searching for that one-hole group load is a pleasant hobby all by itself. Beats sitting in a bar on evenings.

Dgunsmith 10-13-2007 02:58 AM

Reloading:
 
Reloaders are the original recyclers !

Your cost per round reloading your brass is a significant savings over factory ammo.

Equipment costs are spread out over a lifetime as they really dont wear out.
You must buy primers by the 1,000 to get the best price.
You didnt say what calibers but buying pistol bullets in bulk 1,000 at a time will save $$$.

There are 7,000 grains in a pound of powder. Look up how many grains the load you wish to do uses, divide 7000 by that to see how many loads per pound you will get. If rifle rounds, buying powder in 8 pound kegs saves big $$$.

Lead bullets are cheapest for pistols, FMJ next then JHP cost the most.
With rifle reloads, you can tune the load for maximum accuracy out of your rifle.

Best bet is talk with a local NRA affiliated club and take the basic reloading course. Great starting point. You will save $$$

Catfish 10-17-2007 01:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Felix (Post 10060)
Can reloading be cost-effective or in the end do you end up paying the same amount as if you purchased ammo?

Has anyone ever done the meticulous calculations to determine the truth?

The real answer is it will cost you alot more to shoot if you reload. The cost per round will be more accurate than factory ammo and will cost you less than 50% of new ammo, but you will end up shooting at least 10 time the amount that you do when you buy factory.

Lambert 12-06-2007 02:09 AM

Reloading Saves Money
 
Hi, Felix. Interesting question. Unless you shoot 1000s of round in one calibre, or load for MANY calibres, getting into the reloading business is quite costly, and your cost per round will be prohibitively high. If you are just getting into reloading, quite often members of a local shooting club will have surplus used equipment for sale.

Money aside, there is a lot of pleasure in reloading your own, beside the potential for more accurate ammo than you can purchase. You cannot buy decent 30-30 ammo for a Savage 340 or 24F rifle for example, but you can surely load your own. You will eventually want to expand into bullet casting, etc. The list is endless.

The way I look at it, I don't save money, but I sure shoot a lot more!

Lambert

robocop10mm 12-06-2007 02:27 PM

Reloading
 
You can save big $ if you reload but, you will likely shoot more negating the savings. Your skills will improve greatly so it is worth it. Reloading can become as much of an addiction as shooting.
I reload for 26 different calibers and cast bullets for 12 different handgun calibers and 6 rifle calibers as well as two muzzle loading diameters.

I have kept my eyes open for dies and molds in common calibers even if I do not have a gun that shoots that caliber. I have an assortment of ammo for many calibers that I do not have guns for. Just in case I come across one some day. You never know when you will find a .38 super or .243 and need ammo.

rickrem700 12-06-2007 05:15 PM

Reloading
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by robocop10mm (Post 12418)
You can save big $ if you reload but, you will likely shoot more negating the savings. Your skills will improve greatly so it is worth it. Reloading can become as much of an addiction as shooting.
I reload for 26 different calibers and cast bullets for 12 different handgun calibers and 6 rifle calibers as well as two muzzle loading diameters.

I have kept my eyes open for dies and molds in common calibers even if I do not have a gun that shoots that caliber. I have an assortment of ammo for many calibers that I do not have guns for. Just in case I come across one some day. You never know when you will find a .38 super or .243 and need ammo.

I also reload a lot of different rounds, and it is addictive, I love all the math involved in finding the perfect load!!! as far as saving money, I probably shoot more than most people do so I guess I have saved money somewhere along the way, but as Robocop stated its addictive and I already have an addictive personality so I reload every cal I have to many to list, and cast every black powder round known to man, so yes the investment is huge, and inventory is a nightmare! however the price of ammo has gone strait through the roof. For example my 300 ultra mag ammo cost around 67.00 dollars a box of twenty my 30-378 cost 130.00 dollars a box of twenty, you can see the savings is huge on those two, these are Gander Mountain prices you could probably find them cheaper somewhere else, I just happen to notice them ,as I was just there yesterday. The only draw back I can think of about reloading, It's kind of like having the only pickup truck on your buddy's moving day, my friends are constantly hitting me up to reload for them and I hardly have time to keep up with my own, word to the wise encourage your Buddy's to reload also!!!

WILDCATT 12-09-2007 02:17 AM

cost
 
If you buy Lee turret press 4station/dies/powdermeasure /scale /mold/pot.you
can figure about $200.
BUT the biggest point is you will have the availability to produce ammo when there is no more available.rifle ammo is now about $15 to $40 per 20 rds.pistol ammo is about $15 per 50 and all going up.In Mass you cant order and have it shipped you have to buy from dealer.a lot are going to RI or NH to get their supplies.

RePete 12-12-2007 03:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Felix (Post 10060)
Can reloading be cost-effective or in the end do you end up paying the same amount as if you purchased ammo?

NO! You will spend more, because you will shoot more. It is a natural law!!:eek:

Has anyone ever done the meticulous calculations to determine the truth?

Actually there is a saving IF you use range brass that you've picked up, buy the bullets, primer and powder in large quantities.

If you can get in on a local bulk buy, the savings can be large.

Right now .223 and 9mm may not be the best to reload, as ammo is fairly cheap. .223 for a bolt action may be reloaded to what you require in accuracy.


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