is reloading worth it?
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Old 02-24-2012, 06:46 PM   #1
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Default is reloading worth it?

I want to start reloading but I want now is it worth it?

I'm going to reload for a 22-250 and a 30-06 I only shoot a couple hundred rounds a year and I don't want to waste my money and it not be worth it can someone help me thank u.

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Old 02-24-2012, 06:48 PM   #2
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I don't think a couple of hundred rounds a year is worth it unless you have a need for match grade ammo.

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Old 02-24-2012, 06:54 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silverado113
I don't think a couple of hundred rounds a year is worth it unless you have a need for match grade ammo.
Well the 06 is my want to be long range rifle so I do want to make so loads for it to make it more accurate for 300 yards shots
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Old 02-24-2012, 07:10 PM   #4
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There is more to economics than just money. The worth of something can mean many things. If you want to reload and you like it then it's worth it. If you don't want to or don't like it then it isn't worth it.

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Old 02-24-2012, 07:19 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rjd3282
There is more to economics than just money. The worth of something can mean many things. If you want to reload and you like it then it's worth it. If you don't want to or don't like it then it isn't worth it.
I want to but I don't want to lose money in the process cuz I don't have much at the moment cuz I'm 17 and the only job I got is babysitting lol and I only make 50 to 70 Buck every other week
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Old 02-24-2012, 10:36 PM   #6
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Start small and work your way up. In time you'll be reloading for more calibers and you wont have to stop by the store to get ammo on your way to shoot... when 06 ammo is running a buck a round and it aint likely to get any cheaper, at 17, in the long run look how much you will save by the time your in your 40's like me.

Start up costs at first can seem daunting, but you by a good Lee press and carbide dies, take care of them, you wont have to bite that bullet again.

I have only been loading a few years now and have made my money back from original start up costs in 44 mag ammo alone...not to mention the 357, 06, 35 rem, .223 etc

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Old 02-24-2012, 10:47 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdaddy573 View Post
I want to but I don't want to lose money in the process cuz I don't have much at the moment cuz I'm 17 and the only job I got is babysitting lol and I only make 50 to 70 Buck every other week

Take your time do the research for what will work best for you. When I was 17 I wanted everything now but as you get older that isn't always best. Do like the other poster said start small, a Lee single stage press is cheap and you can get your feet wet. Years actually decades ago I started out banging out rounds with a Lee loader and a mallet. I have upgraded considerably since those days. But I don't regret the old days. Go to Lee's website I'm sure they'll have a kit you can afford.
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Old 02-24-2012, 10:48 PM   #8
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Unless you need to custom load match grade ammo the decision comes down to economics. A simple break-even calculation will let you know how much you save and how long it will take to recover your upfront cost. For example if the equipment, brass tumbler, dies, etc cost $800 how long will it take to save that amount of money. Now add up the material costs of loading the number of rounds you shoot annually, plus any reserves you want to store, let's say 1,000 rounds at $.50 each so loading cost is $500. If you purchase those 1,000 rounds for say $700 you save $200 and recover your equipment costs and break even in 4 years, after 4 years you pocket the $200.

Obviously the higher the round count or the more exotic and expensive the ammo the higher the savings. Many rounds like .338 Lapua or .458 SOCOM are just not affordable to shoot with commercial loads...more mundane and affordable rounds just won't offer much savings unless you are shooting thousands of rounds a year. One other thing to keep in mind is that you will need to acquire that first brass inventory to reload with.

Hope that helps.

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Old 02-24-2012, 10:49 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fmj
Start small and work your way up. In time you'll be reloading for more calibers and you wont have to stop by the store to get ammo on your way to shoot... when 06 ammo is running a buck a round and it aint likely to get any cheaper, at 17, in the long run look how much you will save by the time your in your 40's like me.

Start up costs at first can seem daunting, but you by a good Lee press and carbide dies, take care of them, you wont have to bite that bullet again.

I have only been loading a few years now and have made my money back from original start up costs in 44 mag ammo alone...not to mention the 357, 06, 35 rem, .223 etc
That's how I'm looking at it but I want to make sure cuz I only have a little more to go tell I can get my press which is a another problem cuz I can't choose witch one I want cuz I'm looking at Lee's 50th anniversary kit and Lee's deluxe turrent press kit which is around the 120 to 140 dollars
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Old 02-24-2012, 10:57 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rjd3282

Take your time do the research for what will work best for you. When I was 17 I wanted everything now but as you get older that isn't always best. Do like the other poster said start small, a Lee single stage press is cheap and you can get your feet wet. Years actually decades ago I started out banging out rounds with a Lee loader and a mallet. I have upgraded considerably since those days. But I don't regret the old days. Go to Lee's website I'm sure they'll have a kit you can afford.
I looked at the lee classic loader and all most got it but now I'm getting more caliber I figure starting off with a single stage press kit or Lee deluxe turrent press kit would be better cuz all I would need is dies for the other calibers
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