Reloading Tips, Techniques, & Helpful Hints - Page 3
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Old 01-26-2010, 01:37 AM   #21
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Spitty, I haven't decided on a press as of yet. I have the possibility of getting one from my brother-in-law who inherited one but doesn't load his own ammo. Unfortunately, I have to get approved by the Mrs. and that may take some convincing. What I really would like is a press that gives me the most bang for my buck. I think I might start with a Lee and if it is something that I want to do for the long haul then I might move up to a higher quality brand.

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Old 03-06-2010, 03:45 AM   #22
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Don’t know what you will be reloading, I reload for about 20 different cartridges, some of which are bottlenecked and others straight walled. I have added one step when I reload a straight walled cartridge with cast bullets, which for me is mostly .44 Mag. ammo. If using jacketed bullets I see no need to do this. Your typical sequence here is to: (this is for a 3 die straight walled cartridge, not a 2 die bottleneck case)
1. Size, de-cap, prime
2. Expand and bell the case mouth
3. Drop powder, insert bullet, seat and crimp (some people seat then readjust their die to crimp the bullet)

My extra step here is that I will use a .45 seating die in step 3 to seat my bullet and then step 4 run it through the .44 seating/crimping die to crimp the bullet in the case. I do this because I have found that if I use my .44 seating die it will immediately reduce the bell on the case mouth and I get a lot more chance of shaving lead off the side of the bullet. The .45 die being a bit larger does not reduce the bell and eliminates shaving of lead off the side of the bullet. I prefer to bell my cases as little as possible because it works the brass less and I will get more re-loadings before the necks start to crack.

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Old 03-06-2010, 04:10 AM   #23
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1. Keep your work area as un cluttered and organized as possible. I always start out this way but after a couple of hours I cant find stuff cause of all the stuff I own is now on the bench. You will spend more than you will ever save reloading on really neat tools and stuff.
2. Master one cartridge at a time.
3. Know that velocity does not always equal accuracy.
4. Quit before you get tired. You will make mistakes if you get too tired. Yeah, I know its fun, but save some for tomorrow.

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Old 03-06-2010, 05:52 PM   #24
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Default Crimping and over all length for handguns.

A lot of newbies over crimp the bullets. This makes the bullet deformed and or undersized...both aspects are detrimental to accuracy. Usually I will do the "push test" to see if the bullet moves in the case; take the loaded and crimped round (usually a dummy with no powder or primer) and press it bullet nose first into the side of the bench or some other hard, unyielding surface,....very important because you don't want to have the bullet driven deeper in the case (in autoloading guns)....pressures will be raised. The opposite happens in revolvers...the bullet will move forward and you will never get any accuracy ( I have had some bullets creep forward in my Bisley when shooting standard hardball loads in the 45 ACP cylinder)...worse case you will have a loose bullet and powder all over you gun. Uniform crimp is important to facilitate an equal start pressure to insure complete and consistent burn of the powder charge....helping you on the way to accuracy. I like to crimp until I get no bullet movement, then pull it to check how much the case is digging into the bullet. If you can see a very light indentation with a taper crimp you are ok....if it is measured and you have a crimp that makes a difference in bullet diameter of .001"...too much! On magnum loads in revolvers...use a heavy roll crimp so that big charge of 296 or what ever slower powder you are using gets good combustion. On overall length.....Revolvers; determined by cylinder length and crimp groove placement on the bullet...be careful as some jacketed bullets have more than one crimp groove! On an autoloading pistol; Use the overall length in the manual then drop a loaded round in the barrel of you pistol...make sure you take the barrel OUT of your gun when you do this! The loaded round should drop in and make a nice 'POINK' sound...I know, sounds very unscientific but it works! Also the round should rotate freely, if there is any drag then the bullet is touching the rifling and pressures will increase. Very important for guns with unsupported chambers like Glocks! Also do this check if you change brand of bullet....all 230 grain 45 bullets can't be loaded to the same overall length, same with any auto pistol cartridge! The ogive might be different and that will determine where the bullet will engage the rifling! This is also true in rifles! Like all the other posters before have advised, go slow, and READ, READ, READ...if you know some handloaders...ask a lot of questions!

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Last edited by cliffspot; 03-06-2010 at 05:58 PM. Reason: Added some other info and changed some grammar!
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Old 03-07-2010, 02:41 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canebrake View Post
Don't touch your primers.
Can I touch the box and/or fill tube??
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Old 03-07-2010, 02:56 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kusterleXD View Post
Spitty, I haven't decided on a press as of yet. I have the possibility of getting one from my brother-in-law who inherited one but doesn't load his own ammo. Unfortunately, I have to get approved by the Mrs. and that may take some convincing. What I really would like is a press that gives me the most bang for my buck. I think I might start with a Lee and if it is something that I want to do for the long haul then I might move up to a higher quality brand.
Just remember-you get what you pay for. Cheap tools cost less to buy and bring A LOT less on the sale. Quality tools cost more to buy and bring more on the re-sale.The cheap (Lee) tools that I have are ONLY used on non-critical stages of the load process. I do not believe that it is cost effective to use Craftsman Tools at my work-I use Snap-On. Most of my load tools are Dillon or RCBS. AGAIN-you get what you pay for...
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