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Old 02-03-2013, 03:56 AM   #51
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I haven't read this whole thread, so sorry if this has already been said.

For the most part, reloading won't save you money. You will spend a simular amount, but you will shoot more.

Reloading is also handy for making rare/nonexistant calibers easier to get, or making super expensive ammo cheaper. Take 7.62 Nagant for example. I reload for that round, and can do it for MUCH cheaper than I could ever buy it. I also don't have to hunt down a source for it. (It's not really that hard to find, but it is a little pricy if you want to shoot it a lot)

Reloading will also allow you to get the most out of your gun. You can work up an extremely accurate load specially made for your gun if you reload.

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Old 02-03-2013, 05:56 AM   #52
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I saw 50 rd boxes of 45 ACP selling for $33/box of 230 gr fmj.

I have been reloading for 20 yrs and I shoot accurate quality ammo, not cheap ammo. Tula, Wolf, PMC, Silver Bear, ect,..ect..may not shoot well in all rifles, dirty, you have to clean more often to keep shooting. Definitely not as accurate, have you measured the brass of once fired rds? You put on sme rubber gloves and your ready to to keep the oils off the ammo. The powder is enclosed, no dust floating around. Primers are placed in a tray, not touched with hand to keep from contaminating. The operation is pretty clean for most use single stage or turret press, powder drops from a capped dispenser. Most bullets are set by hand one at a time.
Progressive presses can be a little more challenging, but once they are set up, the process is fast and clean.

Right now I save $17/box of 20 rds of FMJ 223, premium bullets I save $15/bx of 20. You can even get any 223 hardly, no fun if you don't reload!

I saw the writing on the wall when the dictator was running in 2007, the Dem Congress was in place. I was expecting a hard run on the 2A 3yrs ago, we have a little panic buying then but nothing like this.

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Old 02-03-2013, 02:13 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nitestalker
Do you butcher your own meat? Do you warm your house with wood you have cut? Do you can your own chili peppers and make your own beer? Do you cast bullets and reload?
How much is feeling free and independent worth?
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Not yet
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Old 02-03-2013, 03:50 PM   #54
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I'm sorry, but I am not following some of the logic. I posted earlier with costs per box of my reloads. I don't shoot anymore now than I did before I started handloading. One of the arguments given, was if you reload, you'll shoot more and therfore you're not saving any money. Well yes you are. If you are a shooter that really likes to shoot a lot of ammo, then you are still saving money. It costs me less than $30.00 to load 10 boxes of 38spl. To buy 10 boxes of 38spl would cost $150-$200 or more. Even if you shoot all 10 reloaded boxes in one outing to the range you have saved a tremendous amount of money. I have very simple reloading equipment. I'm not the kind of guy that has to go and spend money on new toys. I use what I have. The bottom line is, reloading saves a huge amount of money. As I said in my earlier post, I do cast my own bullets, and that, again is a big money saver.

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Old 02-03-2013, 05:09 PM   #55
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Originally Posted by gr8oldguy View Post
I'm sorry, but I am not following some of the logic. I posted earlier with costs per box of my reloads. I don't shoot anymore now than I did before I started handloading. One of the arguments given, was if you reload, you'll shoot more and therfore you're not saving any money. Well yes you are. If you are a shooter that really likes to shoot a lot of ammo, then you are still saving money. It costs me less than $30.00 to load 10 boxes of 38spl. To buy 10 boxes of 38spl would cost $150-$200 or more. Even if you shoot all 10 reloaded boxes in one outing to the range you have saved a tremendous amount of money. I have very simple reloading equipment. I'm not the kind of guy that has to go and spend money on new toys. I use what I have. The bottom line is, reloading saves a huge amount of money. As I said in my earlier post, I do cast my own bullets, and that, again is a big money saver.
I agree with you completely. When comparing if one thing is more expensive than the other one must compare apples to apples, that means compare cost to load 1 shell to cost of buying that shell already loaded, it has nothing to do with how much you shoot. It is far cheaper to reload ammo as far as price per round goes, if you are the type of person to shoot up 3 times more ammo per outing because you got it cheaper then that is a totally different issue and has no bearing on the cost of reloading. Reloading saves a ton of money, in the situation where you shoot more you are causing yourself the extra cost by choosing to use more ammo, each one of those shots is still less than half the price of factory ammo so even while burning more ammo than you did before you are still saving money.
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Old 02-03-2013, 05:23 PM   #56
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Originally Posted by TruCorAmmo View Post
here is my two cents worth :P Personal reloading is a way to save SOME money, reloads even manufactured reloads such as Black Hills, and soon TruCor, are about QUALITY, when a company or person uses hand swaged bullets with hand reloaded bullets, the QUALITY of the finished product is worth it, especially for the serious shooter or avid hunter who wants to guarantee the drop of their target or a tight grouping. The money used on reloading supplies isn't that much and the more you buy in bulk, the better the cost savings you will get. The problem for the average PERSONAL reloader, is the powder and primers and one fired brass purchases. You guys get REAMED on cost per bullet with those 3 things especially brass and powder. The higher bulk purchase you can get the lower your cost per unit.. the problem being this.. you can't purchase bulk POWDER without a manufactuer's FFL. So yes and no with saving cost. Even INCLUDING our employee cost, we get high quality finished ammunition for about the cost of federal/winchester. Now for an avid shooter or competition shooter or avid hunter that wants the quality and certainty of their bullet doing what it is supposed to do and going where its supposed to go, paying $1-$3 more per box is nothing.
Bullets are by far the highest cost of my reloading components, I am able to find once fired brass very reasonable when I shop around which isn't often, primers we order a large amount with a group of friends and even getting them at a gun show has worked out fine. I don't need to buy "bulk" powder, I save plenty of money by using 1 lb or sometimes 8 lb jugs, maybe I could save more with bulk but I also would be stuck to 1 kind of powder rather than a few different jugs I can mess with.

I am not buying what you are selling, you are claiming your reloads are cheaper because of all this bulk stuff yet your employee cost puts your price comparable to the factory load anyways. Even your hand loads will not produce the accuracy of every individuals homemade hand loads, I equate buying your loads to going out and buying a box of Federal Premiums, they are a little better than regular, more consistent maybe and nicer bullet or whatever, but it's still a mass produced load and impossible to tune to each individual's rifle. How do you address different chamber sizes, different rifles liking different bullets or brands/weights of powder? I think any serious competition shooter would rather load their own than buy hand loads.
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Old 02-03-2013, 05:31 PM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gr8oldguy View Post
I'm sorry, but I am not following some of the logic. I posted earlier with costs per box of my reloads. I don't shoot anymore now than I did before I started handloading. One of the arguments given, was if you reload, you'll shoot more and therfore you're not saving any money. Well yes you are. If you are a shooter that really likes to shoot a lot of ammo, then you are still saving money. It costs me less than $30.00 to load 10 boxes of 38spl. To buy 10 boxes of 38spl would cost $150-$200 or more. Even if you shoot all 10 reloaded boxes in one outing to the range you have saved a tremendous amount of money. I have very simple reloading equipment. I'm not the kind of guy that has to go and spend money on new toys. I use what I have. The bottom line is, reloading saves a huge amount of money. As I said in my earlier post, I do cast my own bullets, and that, again is a big money saver.
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Originally Posted by blucoondawg View Post
I agree with you completely. When comparing if one thing is more expensive than the other one must compare apples to apples, that means compare cost to load 1 shell to cost of buying that shell already loaded, it has nothing to do with how much you shoot. It is far cheaper to reload ammo as far as price per round goes, if you are the type of person to shoot up 3 times more ammo per outing because you got it cheaper then that is a totally different issue and has no bearing on the cost of reloading. Reloading saves a ton of money, in the situation where you shoot more you are causing yourself the extra cost by choosing to use more ammo, each one of those shots is still less than half the price of factory ammo so even while burning more ammo than you did before you are still saving money.
if you shoot the same amount of reloaded ammo, then you have cut your ammo costs in half at least. but if you shoot the equivalent amount of money spent, you haven't save money, but you are able to shoot about twice as much.

your ammo cost per round is still cheaper, than factory ammo, irregardless of how little or how much you shoot. EG: if factory ammo is 0.30 cents per round and your reloaded ammo is 0.15 cents per round, the amount you shoot is irrelevent to this cost because it doesn't change. only factor in what amount you shoot. so if you were say buying 500 rounda month for practice or target use and you started reloading and you continue to shoot 500 reloaded rounds a month, then you have cut your ammo costs in half. now if you started shooting say 1000 rounds now of reloaded ammo, then you are still spending as much as you did for factory ammo, but you're able to shoot now twice as much.

hope this clears up any confusion, sorry haven't had my coffee yet.
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Old 02-03-2013, 05:46 PM   #58
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at what amount does one need to buy in regards to bulk powder to need an FFL to purchase? i have never heard of such a thing. i know some of us buy in bulk amounts on powder and primers. just curious.

and IMO, it sounds morelike you're trying to drum up business. you might think about setting up as a vendor before doing so. there are rules here on the forum for such things. just my thoughts.

Let me clarify a few things for you Axxe55. 1) when I say bulk I mean hundreds to thousands of pounds per month. From what I've seen in these forum chats so far, is no one loads enough per month to warrant that amount of gunpowder. Try calling a gunpowder supplier and tell them you want to purchase in bulk, they will tell you, to supply your FFL number before they will even discuss prices with you. For an average .223 55 gr bullet, there is approximately 7,000 grains per lb, you do the math on 1lb of gunpowder at retail, then imagine the discount you get if you order in bulk. That as well as all the components used in reloading it is simple, the more you buy in bulk the more you save, just as when you buy in bulk ammo you save a little money.

To go on to your other comment, I have already spoken to notdku about being set up as a vendor, but thank you for telling me the rules.

To go on your other comment, drumming up business isn't why I am here, IF business comes from some of you guys great, if not, no big deal. Our automated presses and dillion machines run 24 x 7 and we still can't keep up with the demand as it is, so more business until our next batch of machines arrive is kind of a mute point, unless someone is wanting actual individual components. Right now about the only thing we will have after the next 30 day production run is .223 open tip bullets for reloading. I appreciate your concern with me following the forum rules, but I assure you, I am not here to just drum up business
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Old 02-03-2013, 08:36 PM   #59
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you don't save money in the fact that you will always buy more stuff more bullets, more powder, more primers, more boxes, more gadgets all of it.

Don't reload to same money. Reload to reload I enjoy reloading it is relaxing and allows me to customize each and every load to my specific gun and use.

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Old 02-04-2013, 02:18 AM   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TruCorAmmo View Post
For an average .223 55 gr bullet, there is approximately 7,000 grains per lb
What does the caliber of the shell to be loaded have to do with how many grains are in a lb?

I would think there are 7000 grains in a lb of powder whether you are loading a 9mm or a 300 mag.
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