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Old 02-01-2013, 03:09 AM   #21
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Yes I can see both sides. Personally, I don't shoot all that much. Just enough to keep familiar with my firearm. I use my .40 as a hunting sidearm and HD gun mostly. I just like the idea of having a good supply of ammo just in case something happens. My initial interest is to just build up my ammo amount and have fun making it all in the process. My own thoughts and what I've read so far leads me to believe that if I shoot the same amount as I do now and get past the initial investment, I would save a decent amount of money. Therefore making stocking up on ready to shoot rounds cheaper than buying them in store. Am I correct?

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Old 02-01-2013, 03:15 AM   #22
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Yes I can see both sides. Personally, I don't shoot all that much. Just enough to keep familiar with my firearm. I use my .40 as a hunting sidearm and HD gun mostly. I just like the idea of having a good supply of ammo just in case something happens. My initial interest is to just build up my ammo amount and have fun making it all in the process. My own thoughts and what I've read so far leads me to believe that if I shoot the same amount as I do now and get past the initial investment, I would save a decent amount of money. Therefore making stocking up on ready to shoot rounds cheaper than buying them in store. Am I correct?
Yep but only if you have enough already fired brass to make up the loads. If you're going to stockpile loaded ammo you'll need the brass. It will be even longer to recoup your cost if you have to buy new brass. Or, you can stock the components and load in batches as you shoot.
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Old 02-01-2013, 03:21 AM   #23
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Yes I can see both sides. Personally, I don't shoot all that much. Just enough to keep familiar with my firearm. I use my .40 as a hunting sidearm and HD gun mostly. I just like the idea of having a good supply of ammo just in case something happens. My initial interest is to just build up my ammo amount and have fun making it all in the process. My own thoughts and what I've read so far leads me to believe that if I shoot the same amount as I do now and get past the initial investment, I would save a decent amount of money. Therefore making stocking up on ready to shoot rounds cheaper than buying them in store. Am I correct?
as C3 suggested, buy the book, The ABC's Of Reloading. excellent book an very informative. it will explain a lot of your questions.

yes ther is an initial investment. but this equipment will last a lifetime if taken care of. i am using my fathers equipment he bought in the late 60's. it's well over 40 years old and still going strong. it will most likely outlast me by a long shot. at say $400 for what he spent on the equipment divided by 40 years, it has cost about $10 per year to use. so you ned to figure out if it saves money or not for you. i know it does for me.
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Old 02-01-2013, 03:41 AM   #24
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OK, so you can save some money by reloading. I have never sat down w/ pencil and paper and tried to figure it out. I haven't bought a box of factory ammo in years so I don't even know what it costs any more. I do know that I am always buying powder, primers, bullets; and I am also buying new dies, gadgets, and books from time to time. If I only had factory ammo to shoot and did not reload, I would hardly ever shoot. Why? Because the main reason I shoot is to develop different loads in each of my rifles. If I then would hardly ever shoot, I would not be spending as much money. Does that make sense?
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Old 02-01-2013, 03:53 AM   #25
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In most cases it does save you money if you look at it cost wise cartridge vs cartridge. Here's the thing that happens to a lot of hand loaders myself included. When you first begin loading your pretty satisfied just to chamber it, here it go bang, and have it extract like its supposed to. Then the more I began to learn the more I wanted to experiment with things. I started buying multiple varieties of bullets and powders and began developing loads for practically every firearm I owned lol. Rifles I had owned for years were shot more in 6 months than they were the the whole time I had owned them! Now I'm sure that I'm saving money over factory Rounds, especially large magnums. The problem is it will take me a long time to start seeing any savings after all the money I have spent in load devolopment.

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Old 02-01-2013, 03:57 AM   #26
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OK, so you can save some money by reloading. I have never sat down w/ pencil and paper and tried to figure it out. I haven't bought a box of factory ammo in years so I don't even know what it costs any more. I do know that I am always buying powder, primers, bullets; and I am also buying new dies, gadgets, and books from time to time. If I only had factory ammo to shoot and did not reload, I would hardly ever shoot. Why? Because the main reason I shoot is to develop different loads in each of my rifles. If I then would hardly ever shoot, I would not be spending as much money. Does that make sense?
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all you have to do is get an app for a cost comparison. i have one on my computer. plug in the numbers, viola" instant cost analysis of what it costs per round, per 20, per 50 or even 1000.

i still buy some factory ammo, but mainly because i want the brass for reloading. so for me buying factory ammo is a two for one deal. i get to shoot if for practice and then have the brass for reloading.

yes i will admit the equipment is an initial investment like i said before. but it will more that likely outlast the original buyer by many years. yes i do buy new dies when i add a new caliber into the mix. can't reload with out it. but i think that the initial investment will pay for itself in the long run if the fact that one can make fine tuned ammo to a specific firearm, the enjoyment of the reloading and the cost savings over premium factory ammo.
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Old 02-01-2013, 03:59 AM   #27
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In most cases it does save you money if you look at it cost wise cartridge vs cartridge. Here's the thing that happens to a lot of hand loaders myself included. When you first begin loading your pretty satisfied just to chamber it, here it go bang, and have it extract like its supposed to. Then the more I began to learn the more I wanted to experiment with things. I started buying multiple varieties of bullets and powders and began developing loads for practically every firearm I owned lol. Rifles I had owned for years were shot more in 6 months than they were the the whole time I had owned them! Now I'm sure that I'm saving money over factory Rounds, especially large magnums. The problem is it will take me a long time to start seeing any savings after all the money I have spent in load devolopment.
but are you enjoying the load development? if so, then it's worth it to be reloading and shooting.
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Old 02-01-2013, 04:11 AM   #28
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Your per-round costs will be less, but your rounds-per-range trip will go up, so there is this delta point where, once you pass that point, you are spending more shooting than you would have had you not taken up reloading in the first place. Add to that the guns that you would have dismissed owning because they are rare and/or expensive to buy ammo for- but now you can make your own, and you are buying more guns. Now add to that all of the obscure reloading dies and equipment that you will end up with because your buddy's-sister's-friend's-husband-who-was-a-reloader-passed-away-and-left-behind-all-of-this-useless-stuff-would-you-please-come-haul-it-off-for-her-or-its-going-to-the-dump and then you have a bunch of new dies that you have to get guns for. (This exact thing has happened to me three times now- well, only once was it my buddy's sister's friend's husband. The other times it was an ex-husband and another was a father.).

It has a way of creeping up on you.

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Old 02-01-2013, 04:21 AM   #29
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Default Reloading cost

Even if the cost takes a while to even out, gearing up to reload has so many rewards, many already mentioned. For me it is the loading test loads and always searching for that load that is consistently accurate. I am amazed at the accuracy difference between factory loads and fine tuned reloads. By doing a lot of testing with bullets and powders you can often stumble on a really good load. One of my most accurate is a 124/125 gr bullet and AA#7 in 9mm. I have a CZ and Dad has a Browning HP. We have very accurate and consistent groups with this load. We have excellent luck in this load using a .357 dia - 125 grain soft point hollow point.

I also agree with those who mentioned the ease of mind you have when practicing. Reloading makes plinking a real pleasure having not to worry where your next box of ammo will come from.

I hope this 'rush' will level out in a few months. I do suspect that ammo and reloading supplies will end up 10-30% higher than before the rush.

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Old 02-01-2013, 09:09 AM   #30
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The correct way to say it for me at least would have probably been that my per round cost is significantly less but overall I probably end up spending about the same as I tend to shoot any caliber I reload a helluva lot more than ones I am not set up to reload for at this time. .45acp is a good example -- I tear through .45acp ammo like it was .22LR back in the day when you could get a 550 round box of Federal .22 at Walmart for under $15. At the end of most trips to the range, I have at least 6 severely nasty .45 pistols to clean and at least a gallon sized bag of freshly spent .45. So, I break out the solvents, fire up the tumbler...rinse and repeat.

Overall, it is about the same amount of money spent but it's a helluva lot more fun with the same overall cost.

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