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-   -   reloading 223 (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f30/reloading-223-a-76694/)

beltor 11-19-2012 06:06 PM

reloading 223
 
I am starting to reload my 223 brass. How can i tell if the powder charge is right for my ar.

c3shooter 11-19-2012 06:16 PM

First, use load data from a recognized source. Good sources would be a reloading manual, such as the Speer or Lyman manual, OR data taken from the powder company websites. In many of the manuals, it will list the type and barrel length that generated a given speed or energy.

Second, you start with the starting load, and work up. ALWAYS. Examine the brass, and pay attention to the operation of your rifle. Condition of primers wil give you a lot of info on pressures. If the rifle is "short stroking", pay attention.

beltor 11-19-2012 08:05 PM

I am going to use AR-comp and use there load data for 223 55g. Starting with 90% of the powder charge. Now when working up the charge. How do you know when you have reached the right balance.

beltor 11-19-2012 08:14 PM

When you say strong are you refering to the kick/recoil

ryguy00 11-19-2012 09:06 PM

you want to pay attention to accuracy while working up a load. you will see the groups start large, then shrink, then get larger again as you incrementally increase your powder charge. go back to where the groups were the smallest and stay with that powder charge. if your gun doesn't cycle, you don't have enough powder. if your gun blows up, you have too much powder. try seating about .005 shorter than the max length. that will help keep them reliably feeding in your mags without causing pressure spikes from being too short. you do have a reloading manual and a set of calipers right? don't trust a cheap scale for your powder either. make damn sure your scale is correct.

beltor 11-19-2012 10:25 PM

I have have the hornedy book and turret press. Going to start with loading the powder by hand first so i can get the load down. Then going to use the powder loader that came with the press. I have a caliper and a scale.

Sniper03 11-19-2012 10:36 PM

I would also recommend a good quality Reloading Manual and a good Powder Measure. You will likely find as I have that the most accurate load is somewhere between the high load and the low load. A hot or high load usually does not produce the most accurate load and is a waste of powder in reality. For a new re-loader this is hard rule of logic to follow, but in time it will prove true! The Manual will also give the the average feet per second as well as other valuable information. Be sure and keep a detailed record on each batch you load! And as the guys have mentioned each gun has it's own individual personality if you would call it that. And each will respond best with a certain bullet, weight, powder and powder charge. As mentioned when you hit the correct combination the group size will shrink immediately compared to your previous test groups.
Good Luck and Have Fun!
******* One last caution! Do not allow yourself to have distractions when loading! *******

03

Txhillbilly 11-20-2012 12:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beltor (Post 1020159)
I am going to use AR-comp and use there load data for 223 55g. Starting with 90% of the powder charge. Now when working up the charge. How do you know when you have reached the right balance.

You need to start at the minimum charge listed in the manual,and then work yourself up,not at 90% of the powder charge!

Almost any minimum load will cycle your AR just fine,but you want to find the load that will shoot the most accurate in your particular weapon.
Start at the bottom,and work yourself up at either 1/2 a grain or 1 grain increments.
When you find a charge that shoots best,then I will start at the previous load charge and work loads up at 1/10 grain increments until I find the very best load for that weapon.

Changing the bullet or powder,the process starts all over.

CaptAhab 11-20-2012 05:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ryguy00 (Post 1020229)
you want to pay attention to accuracy while working up a load. you will see the groups start large, then shrink, then get larger again as you incrementally increase your powder charge. go back to where the groups were the smallest and stay with that powder charge. if your gun doesn't cycle, you don't have enough powder. if your gun blows up, you have too much powder. try seating about .005 shorter than the max length. that will help keep them reliably feeding in your mags without causing pressure spikes from being too short. you do have a reloading manual and a set of calipers right? don't trust a cheap scale for your powder either. make damn sure your scale is correct.

I think you meant to say when the gun blows up it is just right @#%&@

steve4102 11-20-2012 07:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Txhillbilly (Post 1020573)
You need to start at the minimum charge listed in the manual,and then work yourself up,not at 90% of the powder charge!

er.

I think he is using Alliant's load data for ARComp. If that's the case, then reducing Alliant's data by 10% is the correct staring point as they only list a Max.


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