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Old 03-03-2011, 09:13 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by cpttango30 View Post
Whats up Eric?

Your not going to save money as in seeing a savings build up. It will be cheaper overall but saving money no. A week doesn't go buy where I don't find a new tool or gadget for reloading.
This is the truth. I started with the basic setup and then found I could justify a digital scale and powder measure with the "savings." Then I wanted to try different powders and bullets. The list can go on and on.

I found myself loading ammo not because I need it, but because it's fun. But the benefit to that is that you're stockpiling for Armageddon, so I don't feel too bad about it.

But I explain it to my wife the same way Tango does....."but honey, I'm saving a fortune in ammo."
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Old 03-20-2011, 02:45 AM   #12
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Then there is the other truth....if it costs you less per round, you shoot more rounds.

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Old 03-20-2011, 03:39 AM   #13
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I started with a RCBS Single Stage then went to the 550B & love it.

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Old 03-24-2011, 11:27 PM   #14
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First, great post, OP.

I like being able to tailor my loads to my own needs.

The quality of all your supplies is under your constant scrutiny, and it helps you

make adjustments which you just can't achieve with store ammo.

Oh yeah, and you "save money". (HAH!)

I'm still trying to figure out how many thousand rounds it will take to break even on my initial investment, but saving money wasn't my purpose for starting
reloading in the first place...

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Old 03-25-2011, 02:58 AM   #15
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I reload .44 magnum and started with a Lee 3-hole Turret press. It can do everything a single-stage press can do, but eliminates the need to set up the dies every time (since you don't have to remove them). I am cheap so I just use a couple of dippers to add the powder, and I just set the primers in the priming punch by hand rather than with an automatic feeder. Still, I can reload 10 cases in a little over 4 minutes. I have ADHD (the end of the spectrum that makes it difficult to stay focused--and no I've never used meds to compensate), so I will usually just come out for 10 minutes at a time and load up 20 or so cases. It is not that I get bored, it is more that I start losing focus and don't want to risk overcharging a case! So, I'll often go out to the shop maybe once in the morning and once in the evening, and in two 10-15 minute sessions of relaxed tinkering I've got 50 rounds of ammo loaded for what adds up to about $8.50 (as opposed to about $30 per 50 for the cheapest factory ammo that one would use for practice). I got into a routine of shooting about 100 rounds a week, so it was easy to have replenished my stock in just a couple days without ever feeling pressured. I think this is an important factor in making it enjoyable. Even if I wanted to factor in a basic hourly wage, I'm looking at only like $12-13 for 50 rounds, lol.

I agree with those who say that when you reload and enjoy it, you won't save any money and will instead just shoot a lot more (which definitely isn't a bad thing). I love that I can shoot 100 rounds a week of my reloads for the same cost of 100 rounds per month of cheap practice ammo! Now, if you don't enjoy it and just reload the minimum amount necessary, then yeah you will only save money.

I also agree with those who say another great benefit is the ability to tailor loads how you want, for MUCH cheaper than high-end factory loads. I could load up 50 rounds of defensive-quality ammo for under $20, whereas at best that money would only get me 20 rounds of factory .44 magnum. This means I have the benefit of more easily stocking up on quality, effective ammo. More practically, it also gives the benefit of loading up 50 rounds for the same price as 20, so then I can use 45 rounds for practicing at the range before a hunt, rather than just 15.

Finally, you get the advantage of picking bullets I want and then loading them to the exact velocities I want, which is great for both managing recoil while sticking to the bullet you want, or for tuning a load for max accuracy.

I suppose that was a long rant that wasn't exclusively about press types, but I thought I'd share . This very positive experience in reloading has made me want to get a nice rifle (probably a single-shot) to play with, too!

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Old 03-26-2011, 01:22 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lindenwood View Post
I reload .44 magnum and started with a Lee 3-hole Turret press. It can do everything a single-stage press can do, but eliminates the need to set up the dies every time (since you don't have to remove them). I am cheap so I just use a couple of dippers to add the powder, and I just set the primers in the priming punch by hand rather than with an automatic feeder. Still, I can reload 10 cases in a little over 4 minutes. I have ADHD (the end of the spectrum that makes it difficult to stay focused--and no I've never used meds to compensate), so I will usually just come out for 10 minutes at a time and load up 20 or so cases. It is not that I get bored, it is more that I start losing focus and don't want to risk overcharging a case! So, I'll often go out to the shop maybe once in the morning and once in the evening, and in two 10-15 minute sessions of relaxed tinkering I've got 50 rounds of ammo loaded for what adds up to about $8.50 (as opposed to about $30 per 50 for the cheapest factory ammo that one would use for practice). I got into a routine of shooting about 100 rounds a week, so it was easy to have replenished my stock in just a couple days without ever feeling pressured. I think this is an important factor in making it enjoyable. Even if I wanted to factor in a basic hourly wage, I'm looking at only like $12-13 for 50 rounds, lol.

I agree with those who say that when you reload and enjoy it, you won't save any money and will instead just shoot a lot more (which definitely isn't a bad thing). I love that I can shoot 100 rounds a week of my reloads for the same cost of 100 rounds per month of cheap practice ammo! Now, if you don't enjoy it and just reload the minimum amount necessary, then yeah you will only save money.

I also agree with those who say another great benefit is the ability to tailor loads how you want, for MUCH cheaper than high-end factory loads. I could load up 50 rounds of defensive-quality ammo for under $20, whereas at best that money would only get me 20 rounds of factory .44 magnum. This means I have the benefit of more easily stocking up on quality, effective ammo. More practically, it also gives the benefit of loading up 50 rounds for the same price as 20, so then I can use 45 rounds for practicing at the range before a hunt, rather than just 15.

Finally, you get the advantage of picking bullets I want and then loading them to the exact velocities I want, which is great for both managing recoil while sticking to the bullet you want, or for tuning a load for max accuracy.

I suppose that was a long rant that wasn't exclusively about press types, but I thought I'd share . This very positive experience in reloading has made me want to get a nice rifle (probably a single-shot) to play with, too!
How much shell distortion do you allow?

I'm having a little difficulty resizing .44, there's still a bulge just above the head on the casing which doesn't mike or caliper under .457, even after two passes through the resizing die...
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Old 03-28-2011, 10:27 PM   #17
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Isnt that the actual spec for the case diameter? And as long as it chambers smoothly i wouldnt worry about it. Also the case is webbed (thicker) toward the base, so it maybe shouldnt be resized. But i never noticed particularly since like i said as long as it chambers fine i dont worry about it.

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Old 03-29-2011, 05:23 AM   #18
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Well, I've been reading the post in this thread by Tango, getting some good info, and I am ready, I think, to get into reloading.
I have a 9mm, and a .38, both of which I take to the range often.I am also looking at getting , hopefully, a 1911,(Springfield Range Officer ) soon. My son has a .40, and .45, and he's really hoping I start. You dont suppose he has ulterior motives, do you?.Nahhh.
Anyway, I've been thinking of this for awhile now, looking at manufacturers web sites, since no local stores have actual equipment in store to look at. I 've found that Hornady's has a single stage press kit,"Lock-N-Load Classic Kit" with everything needed to start reloading, except, of course, powder, primers, etc.....for under $400. Seems like a pretty decent price, and Hornady's is a well known company. Anyone have experience with their equip?
While I believe you can probably save a few bucks, I , being retired, think it's something I will enjoy doing. I know hobbies can be costly,....got into photography a few yrs ago,.......and I do own a Harley....

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Old 03-29-2011, 06:01 AM   #19
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Haha well if you own a Harley that you know all about expensive hobbies :P . I've daily ridden a Ninja 250 myself for the last year (even rode on snow a couple days this winter, lol).


I would recommend a Turret press for sure, though. Like I mentioned above, a turret press can do everything a single-stage press can do (you could batch load all the cases if you wanted), but not vise-versa. It is definitely nice not ever having to touch the ties.

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Old 03-30-2011, 02:02 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lindenwood View Post
Haha well if you own a Harley that you know all about expensive hobbies :P . I've daily ridden a Ninja 250 myself for the last year (even rode on snow a couple days this winter, lol).


I would recommend a Turret press for sure, though. Like I mentioned above, a turret press can do everything a single-stage press can do (you could batch load all the cases if you wanted), but not vise-versa. It is definitely nice not ever having to touch the ties.
Yeah, I was riding out in the country, near the mountains last fall, and it started snowing, not a fun ride, but I rode out of it in a few miles.
I've been reading the book, "ABC's of Reloading", getting some idea of what to expect. I had basic knowledge, having a couple of friends who reloaded shot shells in the past, but loading metallic, and different cal's will be a new venture.
I like to research before jumping in, you know, with the cost of equip and all, but I'm pretty sure I will end up doing it. I'm retired, and have plenty of time to learn,...hopefully..
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