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Old 03-17-2013, 06:14 PM   #21
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When I was reloading,
I bought the
LYMAN
recipe book.
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Old 03-17-2013, 08:06 PM   #22
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Default More info.

First of all, thank you to those who have given me valuable advice. I do appreciate that.
Secondly, I (obviously) did not communicate well in my original post. There is more information in this post. Hopefully it will clarify my intentions.

I bought the following:
Alliant "American Select" (blue dot) powder.
Hornady .45 cal (.451") 230 gr. FMJ-RN bullets. [I'm certain those are correct.]
Federal Large Pistol primers [After further study, I'm also certain that these will work well for my purposes.]

Here is some additional information. I have been going very slowly in this process. I have YET to load my first bullet but I have read extensively and chosen the equipment I wanted selectively. I have the Hornady "Reloading for Handgunners" book. The recipes in that book for .45 ACP seem relatively consistent with the lowest powder charge at 4.2 gr and the highest at 9.7 grains. For bullets weighing 230 gr. the powder charges went from 4.2 to 5.9 grains. Alliant responded with a recommendation of between 4.5 gr. and 5.0 gr. for my first attempt using their American Select powder. I will study and be certain that the powder load and bullet that I FINALLY SELECT will work in my firearm. I understand the pressures and physics of these 'controlled explosions' as well as the relative strengths of the steel used for the barrel, etc. in my weapon.

For those of you who chose to ridicule me, I do NOT appreciate that. However, I understand that the act of ridicule typically stems from your feelings of severe inadequacy, and (after all) who knows you better than yourself? There are far too many others on this forum who are willing to share their knowledge and who see me for what I am; someone who is willing to learn and who asks for help before acting. I will listen to them.

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Old 03-17-2013, 08:17 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjfuller1 View Post
here is a site that may help alittle. but i advise getting the ABC's of reloading, and a good manual or 2 or 3. there is a lot more than just throwing it all together.

http://data.hodgdon.com/main_menu.asp
Thank you, sir. This was helpful.
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Old 03-17-2013, 08:18 PM   #24
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Take a look at the web sites for the powder manufacturers and the bullet companies. They can have a lot of useful reloading info, usually for free. One problem that can come up is that for a given bullet and powder the various manuals can disagree a fair amount; so loading to the lighter end of the scale might be a good choice. And keep coming back to this forum and read about the experiences and recommendations posted here.

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Old 03-17-2013, 08:20 PM   #25
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There are 7,000 grs. to a single pound of powder. Loading 5.0 grs. per round 8 lbs will last you well into your "Golden" years.

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Old 03-17-2013, 08:37 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryinCo
First of all, thank you to those who have given me valuable advice. I do appreciate that.
Secondly, I (obviously) did not communicate well in my original post. There is more information in this post. Hopefully it will clarify my intentions.

I bought the following:
Alliant "American Select" (blue dot) powder.
Hornady .45 cal (.451") 230 gr. FMJ-RN bullets. [I'm certain those are correct.]
Federal Large Pistol primers [After further study, I'm also certain that these will work well for my purposes.]

Here is some additional information. I have been going very slowly in this process. I have YET to load my first bullet but I have read extensively and chosen the equipment I wanted selectively. I have the Hornady "Reloading for Handgunners" book. The recipes in that book for .45 ACP seem relatively consistent with the lowest powder charge at 4.2 gr and the highest at 9.7 grains. For bullets weighing 230 gr. the powder charges went from 4.2 to 5.9 grains. Alliant responded with a recommendation of between 4.5 gr. and 5.0 gr. for my first attempt using their American Select powder. I will study and be certain that the powder load and bullet that I FINALLY SELECT will work in my firearm. I understand the pressures and physics of these 'controlled explosions' as well as the relative strengths of the steel used for the barrel, etc. in my weapon.

For those of you who chose to ridicule me, I do NOT appreciate that. However, I understand that the act of ridicule typically stems from your feelings of severe inadequacy, and (after all) who knows you better than yourself? There are far too many others on this forum who are willing to share their knowledge and who see me for what I am; someone who is willing to learn and who asks for help before acting. I will listen to them.
Well said. I never appreciate the "you are so dumb do you know anything" attitude when you are asking for help because you already realize you don't know everything.
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Old 03-17-2013, 08:38 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LarryinCo View Post
First of all, thank you to those who have given me valuable advice. I do appreciate that.
Secondly, I (obviously) did not communicate well in my original post. There is more information in this post. Hopefully it will clarify my intentions.

I bought the following:
Alliant "American Select" (blue dot) powder.
Hornady .45 cal (.451") 230 gr. FMJ-RN bullets. [I'm certain those are correct.]
Federal Large Pistol primers [After further study, I'm also certain that these will work well for my purposes.]

Here is some additional information. I have been going very slowly in this process. I have YET to load my first bullet but I have read extensively and chosen the equipment I wanted selectively. I have the Hornady "Reloading for Handgunners" book. The recipes in that book for .45 ACP seem relatively consistent with the lowest powder charge at 4.2 gr and the highest at 9.7 grains. For bullets weighing 230 gr. the powder charges went from 4.2 to 5.9 grains. Alliant responded with a recommendation of between 4.5 gr. and 5.0 gr. for my first attempt using their American Select powder. I will study and be certain that the powder load and bullet that I FINALLY SELECT will work in my firearm. I understand the pressures and physics of these 'controlled explosions' as well as the relative strengths of the steel used for the barrel, etc. in my weapon.

For those of you who chose to ridicule me, I do NOT appreciate that. However, I understand that the act of ridicule typically stems from your feelings of severe inadequacy, and (after all) who knows you better than yourself? There are far too many others on this forum who are willing to share their knowledge and who see me for what I am; someone who is willing to learn and who asks for help before acting. I will listen to them.
Larry had you written this in your first post on the subject, you might not have garnered such ridicule. choosing your components is not a haphazard guess and hope they work. my suggestion still stands, you might want to look into another source for reloading components.

your first post on this made it sound like you just bought whatevr was available and then wantd to start reloading. gathering from the replies, i wasn't the only one left with this impression. listing the exact components brands and details would have gone alittle further in getting some useful information for you.

BTW, on the ridicule part, i have no severe inadequacies, so you might also want to get a little thicker skin if you hope to survive on the forums. just a friendly suggestion.
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Old 03-17-2013, 08:46 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nitestalker View Post
There are 7,000 grs. to a single pound of powder. Loading 5.0 grs. per round 8 lbs will last you well into your "Golden" years.
Yep, around 11,200 loads. The OP WILL learn to like this powder..HA HA..

Larry, good luck with your Wife's health problems..Bill.
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Old 03-18-2013, 02:41 AM   #29
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Most pistol and shotgun powders can be used in either.

Some very good powders for handgun loading are marked "shotgun powder" on the can.

They're the same burning rate.

But do consult a reloading manual and abide by it.

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Old 03-18-2013, 05:06 AM   #30
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When you load your first round, pay attention to over all length of the cartridge for that particular bullet. Seating a bullet too deeply can increase pressure dramatically.

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