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-   -   Non-loader's Guide to Policing Brass? (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f30/non-loaders-guide-policing-brass-55193/)

therhino 01-10-2012 04:33 PM

Non-loader's Guide to Policing Brass?
 
Hi all.
I'm not a reloader. Right now all I fire is 22LR at a nearby sandpit. Pure plinking.
However, every time I shoot at said sandpit, I come home with pockets full of abandoned brass (in addition to my own).

I know 22LR isn't reloadable (nor is any rimfire cartridge), but some days I come home with a fistful or two of 9mm, .45, and other one-offs. All the steel Wolf casings go in the municipal recycling bin.

Obviously brass has a scrap metal value, but is there any of this stuff that I should be holding to pass on to actual reloaders?
Are the 9mm Luger, .45, and 40S&W cases worth bagging separately from my rimfire stuff and saving inhopes of getting more than scrap value for them?
How about shotgun shells? I pick those as well, and have been cutting the brass from the hull and tossing in with my 22LR. Keep on with that, or save intact?

How oxidized is "too oxidized" for you reloaders? Some of the stuff I've picked up has seen a rainstorm or two, or been snowbound for a while. Does that go straight into the scrap bag, or is it still usable?

Thanks in advance!

c3shooter 01-10-2012 05:44 PM

Do not cut up shotshells- reloadable. 45 40 9mm 38/357 most popular with reloaders, and yes, IS worth more than scrap. Tarnished- no problem. Pitted, problem.

And whenever I am shooting, reloadable or not, I try to be neat- police up my trash. For .22 rimfire, a tarp laid out beofre shooting catches it. Cleanup is 30 seconds.

therhino 01-10-2012 06:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by c3shooter (Post 673148)
Do not cut up shotshells- reloadable. 45 40 9mm 38/357 most popular with reloaders, and yes, IS worth more than scrap. Tarnished- no problem. Pitted, problem.

And whenever I am shooting, reloadable or not, I try to be neat- police up my trash. For .22 rimfire, a tarp laid out beofre shooting catches it. Cleanup is 30 seconds.

Thanks, c3. Looks like I have some sorting and bagging to do tonight during the Bruins game. I'll stop chopping shotshells as well.

When I shoot, I tend to pick up after every 10-round magazine. Saves me from having to count higher than that!

noylj 01-11-2012 04:21 AM

A broom and dust pan works well.
In a sand pit, maybe a shovel and a large colander?

robocop10mm 01-11-2012 11:53 AM

Few shotgun shells these days have real brass bases. Most are brass plated steel. Test w/magnet.

Save it all until you learn what is useful and what is not. Great trading fodder or good will gift to a reloader.

therhino 01-11-2012 01:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by noylj (Post 673781)
A broom and dust pan works well.
In a sand pit, maybe a shovel and a large colander?

haha!
I wonder how much old brass is buried in that pit. I just pick up the easy stuff that's out in the open. No mining for me!

007BondJamesBond007 01-11-2012 03:05 PM

You can put your used brass in a mesh laundry bag. It will let the dirt fall out but not the brass.

JTJ 01-11-2012 03:42 PM

There is a brass trading thread on the forum.

jjfuller1 01-11-2012 03:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JTJ (Post 674087)
There is a brass trading thread on the forum.

plus 1, thats what i was gonna mention

Bigdog57 01-15-2012 04:55 PM

Cull the brass into two basic piles - look in the case to see if it has two small holes (NOT reloadable) or one larger hole (reloadable). Once you divvy out the calibers, you may have something a reloader would buy.
The non-reloadable stuff can be sold to the recycler.


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