New to reloading. What to get??
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Old 09-30-2013, 01:35 AM   #1
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Default New to reloading. What to get??

Retry much as it says. I'm wanting to start reloading for my Glock 22 and 23 40 cal's. I have nothing. What is the best to get and start with. Looking to start with $300 to $500. I have heard people say start with a single stage, but I have a feeling if I do that I will want a Progressive right away. What to do, what to do??

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Old 09-30-2013, 02:03 AM   #2
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I wouldn't get a multistage press until you learn all the inherent dangers involved in reloading. A single stage press is a great learning tool, and can be resold for little loss down the road. I myself enjoy a single stage press and don't mind taking the time. I have NEVER had a squib load, or a HOT load. Don't know if I could say that if I had a multistage press.

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Old 09-30-2013, 02:54 AM   #3
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Get a Lee single stage with the quick change bushings. Get a Lee 4 die set and a Lee powder measure. Get the charge bar and buy a scale. Hornady 1500 is a decent electronic. Lee hand primer and a couple case blocks. At this point your in for under $200 and could sell or trade most of it if you don't like reloading.

With this setup you could probably get in the neighborhood of 200 per hour once you get your system down.

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Old 09-30-2013, 03:13 AM   #4
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Your first step should be to buy a couple of books. Start with 'the abc's of reloading'.

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Old 09-30-2013, 04:31 PM   #5
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Ive been reloading for almost two years. I started with buying the abc's of reloading and read that a few times. Then went and started looking at presses. I reload only for pistol and revolver right now but I started with and RCBS rockchucer single stage and have never had any regrets. It does take longer to deprime and load because I have to change dies for every step but it makes me feel more comfortable with weighing every charge and getting the feel for this hobby. I will start reloading for rifle in a few months but a single stage will always be needed for precision shooting or just to get a base load to see if it will function in you firearm. Then buy as many reloading manuals as you can to cross reference load data. Hope this helps you out. My first rounds of .357mag and just last night I cleaned some 45acp cases and right now I have .44mag in the tumbler..

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Old 09-30-2013, 05:20 PM   #6
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I started with progressive. But I use an actual handloading kit for my .38 Special / .357 Magnum loads. I actually prefer being able to basically supervise every single round, and give each the utmost attention.

That being said, I'm considering adding a single stage press in the near future. I can knock out a lot of rounds on my progressive, but I prefer the accuracy in loads of going slow.

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Old 09-30-2013, 05:30 PM   #7
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I forgot about getting the book. I am up to 3 full books and some of the pamphlets you sometimes get with Western Powder. All are indespensible. The Lyman 49th doesn't have the greatest load info but the front half of the book is great for explaining the reloading process step by step.

I will probably go progressive at some point in the future. Dillon will be top of the list but only for 9mm/.45. Something where I would want a large volume. .44, .357/.38, .223 and .30-06 would stay on the turret press. That is all dependent on whether I get into USPSA shooting and need a larger volume of cartridges than I currently shoot.

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Old 09-30-2013, 06:41 PM   #8
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You aren't going to get set-up with a "good" progressive and all the other goodies needed for $300-$500.

Single stage presses are great and produce excellent ammo, but they are a pain in the rear when loading handgun ammo. Rifle loading usually only takes two dies, a sizing die and a seating die, so single stage presses work well.

Handgun ammo requires at least 3 dies and for many handloaders four.

I would recommend you start out with a Turret Press. It will give you the ability to load one at a time as with a Single stage press, and it will also operate as a Semi-Progressive.

Lee make a nice Turret press and is very well liked by those that own them. Redding makes the best Turret press but it's quit a bit more $$.

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Old 09-30-2013, 07:15 PM   #9
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Congratulations on your new hobby. Read a lot, ask a lot of questions and what ever you do pay attention to what you're doing. good luck

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Old 09-30-2013, 07:34 PM   #10
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Here is a good starting place:

http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f30/reloading-101-great-starting-point-27166/

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