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Old 11-27-2012, 03:17 PM   #11
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Overkill,where in Ogden are you paying such high powder prices? Sportmans Warehouse on Riverdale Rd. is about average. Cal-Ranch is not that bad. Impact Arms is high. Primers at Cabelas In Lehi are average. The Reloading store in North Ogden is a little high. Smith and Edwards is high. You can find powder prices around Weber Co. that are not that bad.
Smith & Eddy's primer prices are pretty good. Their powder prices are simply too high. The cast bullets they carry are quite reasonable, for retail.
Sportsman's primer prices seem ok... when they have what I need in stock. That happens less & less these days. Powder there is reasonable, probably about as good as your likely to find around here.
I didn't know Cal Ranch had reloading supplies. Must investigate.
Impact doesn't carry much. I do wish I'd spent more money when they were clearing out their primers for like $25 per brick. Their cast bullet prices are just sad.
There's a reloading store in North Ogden? Did not know that.
Cabela's can kiss it. I have yet to see anything there that I can't get somewhere else cheaper.
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Old 11-27-2012, 03:31 PM   #12
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No one mentioned pwder scales. I find they are good insurance that your (my) Lee auto powder loader is dropping the correct load.

Rough rule of thumb, 1 lb of powder will give you 1000 rounds for 9 mm or 38 Spl.

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Old 11-27-2012, 03:54 PM   #13
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No one mentioned pwder scales. I find they are good insurance that your (my) Lee auto powder loader is dropping the correct load.

Rough rule of thumb, 1 lb of powder will give you 1000 rounds for 9 mm or 38 Spl.
The Lee Kits have a scale included. I found the Lee scale frustrating, but it will do the job. I ended up buying a Redding after a while.
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Old 11-29-2012, 12:10 AM   #14
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I've been loading 9MM for several decades.

I've finally settled on a "standard" practice load about 10 years ago.

Military surplus cases
Remington 115 FMJ bullets
Remington # 1 1/2 standard small pistol primers
Hodgdon HS-6 powder.
My powder charge is +p+ so I won't post it.

Chronograph velocity from my SIG P226 is 1350 FPS.

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Old 11-29-2012, 12:55 AM   #15
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I cast a 147 grain semi wad cutter. I use it for 38 special and for 9mm. I use Titegroup powder for just about every pistol caliber from .380 to 44 mag. You can pick up a Lee 6 cavity bullet mold for about $36 bucks from Midwayusa.com. The handles are another $12 or so. You can get a melting pot and pouring laddle pretty cheap. For a little more you could get a 20 pound pot with a bottom pour spout. For not a lot more than that one time bullet purchase you could buy everything you will need to cast your own. I could cast 1000 bullets in an evening.

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Old 11-30-2012, 01:09 PM   #16
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I have been hand loading for over 50 years so I will pass on a few tips. First, not to step on any toes, but there are a lot of guys out there cramming a bullet in a case and if it goes bang and the live to see another day all is well. So be cautious of the advice you get on these sites because you don't know the level of experience the poster has. If you are loading for a Glock with a standard factory barrel stay away from lead bullets. The Glock's polygonal rifling will lead up rather quickly and is a pain to remove. Additionally, the leading can cause overpressure issues, which at worse will Ka-Boom. Can you shoot some lead, yes, but I think it's best not. Moly coated lead (black bullets) do not have the leading problem, give good accuracy and are reasonable in price. Plated bullets are another choice. For the best accuracy you will need to go with jacketed bullets, but realize Glocks are not target guns. The most economical bullet weight for a 9mm is 115 or 124 grain bullets. Bullseye, Unique, HP-38/Winchester 231 (identical powders) are all dirty powders. They perform well, but leave a mess in the gun, not to mention the smoke. IMR 4756 is one of the cleanest powders I have ever used. I would recommend it since you cannot double charge without overfilling the case. Go to a shooting range to pickup or buy once fired brass. Military brass will have a date on the head stamp and is not usable unless your remove the primer crimp, for that you need another tool. I perfer using Winchester primers. Unless you reload a lot or hang out with those that do you will not be able to take advantage of buying in bulk, so just look for the best local prices. As far as your equipment follow the manual in setting up your press & dies. A 9mm headspaces on the case mouth so you want to use a very light taper crimp. You most definitely need a good quality scale to adjust your powder measure and check often for consistent drops. If you consider loading maximum loads and I would not suggest it when first starting out because there is just too much you don't know, always weigh these charges. You will need a good dial caliper, not cheap Chinese crap, to measure the OAL (overall length) of the finished round. The rounds must be able to fit in the magazine, but the shorter they are, the higher the pressure and typically less accurate. Done properly, reloading can be rewarding hobby providing custom ammunition that fits your needs for recoil, accuracy and performance. However, unless you are shooting several thousand rounds a year you are not going to save any money factoring in your costs and figuring your time has some value.

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Old 11-30-2012, 06:30 PM   #17
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Some good points, dragonheart.

A little tip I learned many, many years ago. If you don't have a caliper yet, you can set overall length on standard (not max) loads with a factory round of the same bullet weight.

Examle: If you're going to load Hornady XTP 115 bullets, put a factory 115 XTP in the shell holder and adjust your seating stem to just touch it.

Also, when selecting a powder measure, buy quality. I use Redding measures. They're pricey, but they hold calibration.

After a few years of using Redding measures, I started weighing a charge every 100 rounds. They really are that good.

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Old 12-02-2012, 06:09 AM   #18
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I appreciate the great advice, I will be getting in all my equipment soon and will be letting you all know how it all works out.
Thanks.

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Old 12-02-2012, 04:58 PM   #19
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I started out with a RCBS single stage press and added on. I like to reload so I still use the single stage press and reload all winter to shoot all summer.
Some of the more useful additions to my reloading was stainless steel calipers as consistent sizes are key for accuracy and safety, a good accurate scale for accurate powder measurements, and my redding match grade powder drop.
I will calibrate the Redding powder drops using a scale and lock the powder measure down. Then load the rounds, intentionally making them long and measure and adjust down until it is correct. I measure every twenty five or so for powder weight and length and adjust as needed. My powder drops have never been off but the length sometimes will be.
I used Power Pistol for a while. It worked with my .40, .45, .357 sig, .38, and 9mm loads. It has quite a flash and smoke cloud though. I now have moved to VV 320 and only load .45 and 9mm. It is a fast burning clean and expensive powder that works well with heavy bullets. It is also quietest in suppressed weapons and uses very little powder by weight, but still fills the case enough to overflow on a double charge.
I use Barnes copper plated bullets. 147 or 125 grain. They just bumped their prices to $105 per 1k, shipping included if buying direct from them. Both125 and 147 stay subsonic with VV 320 powder. That is key for firing suppressed.

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