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Old 01-15-2010, 02:50 AM   #11
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No they are lead...seen those zinc alloys before when pouring lead for fishing weights...but I'll try the wax. Sounds as if there's where my problem may be. Thank you guys...been a big help and loads of info to take into consideration next go around

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Old 01-15-2010, 04:40 PM   #12
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Other flux options are Marvelux (smoke free), wax based bullet lubes and oily hardwood shavings.
A small amount is all that is needed. A bit the size of your pinky fingernail or smaller is plenty. I have some commercial flux that does not work any better than bullet lube, just less smoke.

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Old 02-16-2010, 06:35 PM   #13
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Wheel weights are mostly antimony which when cooling forms crystals that are coated with pure lead if not properly fluxed, sturred or have the right melt temp and even though bullets may test hard they can sometimes really smear lead in handgun and rifle barrels. Tin based linotype is hard to find nowdays, perhaps because of electronic printers, as well I've heard that aluminum has replaced tin where linotype is used. Tin has become very expensive probably in large part to there being not many tin mines, too bad because it is the best hardening metal for lead bullets. One of the other things that people have used to get tin has been soldier but with all the hazardous material acts that have come about even electronic soldier has become lead free, plumbing soldier was first to do that because of copper water pipes in homes. Both soldiers now use antimony.

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Old 02-16-2010, 07:45 PM   #14
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Wheel weights are not "mostly antimony". They are 95% lead and 4% antimony the remainder being tin and arsenic.
Linotype is commercially available from a variety of sources such as
rotometals.com
nuclead.com
theantimonyman.com

Tin is not the "best" bullet hardening metal. Tin WAS used to harden lead before antimony was available. Tin lowers the surface tension of lead alloy. It allows the alloy to fill the grooves in the bullet mould giving nice sharp edges where they are intended.

Antimony is the #1 bullet hardening metal. Arsenic is valuable also for its hardening qualities.

The basic rule of thumb is adding 2% tin to the alloy increases bullet hardness the same as adding 1% antimony.

I have never heard of aluminum being used in type metal.

A nice primer on the subject can be found at:

Cast bullet reference on lead alloy's, min / max pressure, lube, shrinkage,

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Old 02-17-2010, 04:16 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Viking View Post
Wheel weights are mostly antimony which when cooling forms crystals that are coated with pure lead if not properly fluxed, sturred or have the right melt temp and even though bullets may test hard they can sometimes really smear lead in handgun and rifle barrels. Tin based linotype is hard to find nowdays, perhaps because of electronic printers, as well I've heard that aluminum has replaced tin where linotype is used. Tin has become very expensive probably in large part to there being not many tin mines, too bad because it is the best hardening metal for lead bullets. One of the other things that people have used to get tin has been soldier but with all the hazardous material acts that have come about even electronic soldier has become lead free, plumbing soldier was first to do that because of copper water pipes in homes. Both soldiers now use antimony.
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Old 02-18-2010, 08:59 PM   #16
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If you skimmed the "junk" you probably lost the stuff that makes wheel weights harder than pure lead too. Get yourself a chronograph, if you load rifle stuff it's pretty important. Soft lead bullets will go lots of different places if you push them past about 1600 fps. Different alloys will go somewhat faster but you gotta play with it. The fastest I've ever pushed .30 cal rifle bullets with accuracy was about 2000fps. That was with babbit alloy which is harder than linotype.

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