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Old 10-03-2013, 11:34 PM   #11
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The Zinc alloy weights WILL float on molten lead. They MAY melt eventually if you run the pot temp up enough, but they will float for several minutes at normal liquid lead temps.

The Zinc alloy weights are marked "Zn"

The steel weights are marked "Fe".

Lead wheel weights are lead alloy with the exception of the stick on variety, they are very nearly pure lead.

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Old 10-04-2013, 01:52 AM   #12
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If you want to cull out non lead weights before you smelt, just test them with a sharp pocket knife. Try and "shave" a chunk off the weight with the blade held nearly parallel to the weight. The lead will slice cleanly with the resistance of let's say, cold ice-cream. The zinc will slice and crumble and be much more difficult to slice, and the steel, if you did not cull it out with a magnet, will likely chip your blade. To get a better "feel" for the zinc, try the same test on a brass door knob, which is roughly 30% zinc but will feel practically the same.

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Old 10-04-2013, 02:46 AM   #13
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A deference of 70 degrees is not going to allow any noticeable Zink residue. who runs a melt at melting point? The lead melting point of 620 degrees will not flow even. Most pours are at 750 degrees and for aluminum mold blocks 800 or higher.
The "Flat" WWs while having a BHN of 5 or less is high in Zink. Most serious casters cull these out. I use them to make musket balls for BP waepons.

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Old 10-04-2013, 04:25 AM   #14
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WTF is zink...

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Old 10-08-2013, 12:16 AM   #15
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Zinc wheel weights are harder than lead alloy WW. They ping when dropped on a cast iron or cement surface, vs the thunk of a lead wheel weight.
A pair of side cutter ( wire cutters / dikes) is very useful for quickly figuring out the composition of a given WW.

Because zinc hardens at a higher temperature than lead, a pot of zinc contaminated lead alloy will not fill out a bullet mould correctly.

Zinc contamination is visible by the purple and yellowish iridescent colors in the metal.

Zinc and steel wheel weights will float on top of the molten lead. So, a strainer/ skimmer works for getting off the ones you missed in sorting by visual/ drop/ wire cutter sorting.

Smelt your WW "cool" and you should be good to go.

If you get distracted, SHUT THE DAM HEAT SOURCE OFF and you won't wind up with 50 lbs of useless contaminated lead like I did.

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Old 10-10-2013, 12:05 AM   #16
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Yea I ruined a pot with zinc wheel weights looks like silver oatmeal. All wheel weights that are made recently are non lead.

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Old 10-10-2013, 03:35 AM   #17
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Comparing pure zinc to the alloy in newer wheel weights is just silly. Zinc is a more expensive metal than lead and not very easy to work with. The Zn marked weights are an alloy of zinc and steel. Their melting point is WAY higher than most furnaces are capable of reaching.

And, what are "flat" wheel weights? Are you referring to the stick on weights? Most are pure lead and quite malleable. Some are steel and some are zinc alloy. The same rules apply as with the clip ons. they will float.

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Old 10-10-2013, 04:19 AM   #18
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In order to know what the alloy is you must test the BHN. Most wheel weights vary but may average a BHN 9.5-11. Adding 3.5 % tin can provide a Lyman # 2 of 11-12 BHN. Bullet alloy is chosen by the BHN needed for the pressures you are loading.
Pure zinc WW are 71.5 % Zinc, 28 % Aluminum, 11.5 % copper. A melting point of 787.12 degrees F. They are 20 % lighter than lead.

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Old 10-10-2013, 01:21 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nitestalker View Post
In order to know what the alloy is you must test the BHN. Most wheel weights vary but may average a BHN 9.5-11. Adding 3.5 % tin can provide a Lyman # 2 of 11-12 BHN. Bullet alloy is chosen by the BHN needed for the pressures you are loading.
Pure zinc WW are 71.5 % Zinc, 28 % Aluminum, 11.5 % copper. A melting point of 787.12 degrees F. They are 20 % lighter than lead.
Are you for real? "Pure" zinc melts at 787 degrees Fahrenheit. An alloy of the 3 metals you claim is NOT "Pure". The melting point of such an alloy is significantly higher than 787 degrees.
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Old 10-10-2013, 02:48 PM   #20
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Don't be so fast to criticize on these issues. This is the MSD on Zinc wheel weights. My error heaven for bid using "Pure" I should have said zinc wheel weights. Most caster would read an MSD and understand it.

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