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Old 03-27-2010, 11:07 AM   #21
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If you want a highly polished shine on your cases simply add a couple teaspoons of this Frankford Arsenal Brass Case Polish 8 oz Liquid - MidwayUSA in your "untreated" media, and it works just as well as the high dollar Lyman media.

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+1 on that. I use it in my corncob media after I've run my brass through the walnut media first. I have two tumblers running whenever I am prep'n brass for relaoding.

I would like to comment on the WD40 eating blueing off rifles/guns.. Where are you getting your info from? Is this personal observation? I restore old milsurps as part of my collection hobby and I've always used WD40 to set or cure the blueing when I am done. I've never seen WD40 remove the finish. In fact, the finsih always looks better after the 24 hour cure. I do wipe off the excess before storing the firearms though and now use mobile one as my main gun lube (a convert after reading about it being used by others in this forum)..
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Old 04-02-2010, 10:12 AM   #22
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People tend to get carried away with the wonder liquid WD40 and goop it on. I've had the same can of WD40 and a can of Rem-Oil sitting side by side on the shelf and use them both.
WD40 is a moisture displacement and does that job really well if you're removing oxidation or any type of rust, but once it's done that job when working on a gun it's usually a good idea to scrub off the WD40 and apply something like Rem-Oil. The Rem-Oil is not only good for the Teflon coat but the lowered amount of chance of it gooping up from gunshot residue due to its lower viscosity. As usual, most guns only need a small amount of oil on them if they are kept in good condition.
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Old 04-02-2010, 10:52 AM   #23
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Default WD-40 factoid

The long term active ingredient is a non-volatile, viscous oil which remains on the surface, providing lubrication and protection from moisture. This is diluted with a volatile hydrocarbon to give a low viscosity fluid which can be sprayed and thus get into crevices. The volatile hydrocarbon then evaporates, leaving the oil behind. A propellant (originally a low-molecular weight hydrocarbon, now carbon dioxide) provides gas pressure in the can to force the liquid through the spray nozzle, then itself diffuses away.

These properties make the product useful in both home and commercial fields; lubricating and loosening joints and hinges, removing dirt and residue, extricating stuck screws and bolts, and preventing rust are common usages. The product also may be useful in removing moisture.

I still do not see any reason that it cannot be used or should be scrubbed away and another product applied in it's place. Not trying to be a PITA (Pain in the Arss) here but I've got a dozen rifles in my collection that I've restored and stored with a light coating of WD-40 still applied to them and the finish is still as smooth (not sticky with residue) and deep blue as the day I finished it.
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Old 04-02-2010, 02:48 PM   #24
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The long term active ingredient is a non-volatile, viscous oil which remains on the surface, providing lubrication and protection from moisture. This is diluted with a volatile hydrocarbon to give a low viscosity fluid which can be sprayed and thus get into crevices. The volatile hydrocarbon then evaporates, leaving the oil behind. A propellant (originally a low-molecular weight hydrocarbon, now carbon dioxide) provides gas pressure in the can to force the liquid through the spray nozzle, then itself diffuses away.

These properties make the product useful in both home and commercial fields; lubricating and loosening joints and hinges, removing dirt and residue, extricating stuck screws and bolts, and preventing rust are common usages. The product also may be useful in removing moisture.

I still do not see any reason that it cannot be used or should be scrubbed away and another product applied in it's place. Not trying to be a PITA (Pain in the Arss) here but I've got a dozen rifles in my collection that I've restored and stored with a light coating of WD-40 still applied to them and the finish is still as smooth (not sticky with residue) and deep blue as the day I finished it.
+1. This has been exposed on other threads, but I've used WD-40 for 30+ years with absolutely no issues what so ever. For years I wiped down every gun in my safe with it before storing, and never had any problems, rust, blueinbg wear, etc. on any of them. No, I don't use it for lubrication on critical parts (I actual use Mobile One for that), but for cleaning and protection it has ALWAYS worked great for me.
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Old 04-02-2010, 02:53 PM   #25
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WD-40 WILL remove bluing when applied to an SOS pad and scrubbed on the blued part. Be very careful about using that pesky fluid
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Old 04-02-2010, 03:18 PM   #26
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WD-40 WILL remove bluing when applied to an SOS pad and scrubbed on the blued part. Be very careful about using that pesky fluid
My God, are you implying that the SOS pad could be a contributing factor?!! (Thanks for making me smile) I'll be sticking to my steel buffing wheel on my hand-drill with NO WD-40!...
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Old 04-03-2010, 11:23 PM   #27
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I'm not saying that WD-40 isnt good for the gun, I just like that Rem-Oil was specifically designed for use with firearms and the teflon lubricant that it contains. Its on of those peace-of-mind things for me. I half expect Rem-Oil to be based off the same chemical aspects of WD-40. Now wouldnt that be a shock?
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