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treillw 01-09-2009 01:30 AM

General Reloading Questions
 
I just got an Anaconda 44 mag (first pistol) and started reloading pistol cartridges (first time), and I have a few questions.

Why are Semiwad Cutter bullets called so?

What advantages does crimping bullets offer? Do you get more velocity due to the bullet being held in the cartridge longer and the pressure growing? I loaded some some hornady hollow points with 17 grains of 2400 and I didn't crimp them and they seem to be ok. I'm planning on loading some SWC's with 8-10 grains of unique - Should I crimp them? Is 8 grains of powder enough or is 10 better?

Who makes the best brass? I got a pack of Remington brass for now.

I'm also looking for a nice soft holster that won't wear on the finish. Any Recommendations? I had a uncle mikes sidekick but it seemed pretty abrasive so I returned it.

Feel free to answer any of my many questions. Thanks

robocop10mm 01-09-2009 01:19 PM

Semi wadcutter bullets are called that because they are not full wadcutters. A full wadcutter is a cylinder designed to fit completely inside the case and make clear to see full circle holes in paper. A semi wadcutter has a sub diameter portion near the nose that allows for easier chambering but still makes an easy to see circular hole in paper.

Crimping is needed in a .44 mag for two reasons. Recoil is fairly sharp. The inertia of the bullet will cause the case to be pulled off the bullet and allow the bullet to work out and forward. This can let the bullet protrude forward out of the front of the cylinder and lock up the action. A good firm crimp keeps everything in place. Secondly, powders used in many magnum loads are slower burning and harder to ignite. 2400, 4227, H-335 and W-296 (my favorite) need the bullet to be held firmly in place for the powder to get going properly. I have seen loads that are insufficiently crimped exhibit erratic accuracy/velocity and leave excessive unburned powder behind (especially 4227 and 2400).

spittinfire 01-09-2009 03:31 PM

I'll add to that crimp comment, although what is listed is accurate. In semi autos the crimp can help or impead chambering. If the shoulder is too sharp on the edge of the case this can cause the round to misfeed and a slight crimp can correct this.

I haven't been able to find any brass that is better for me than another but I've only been reloading for a year or so, more experienced folks may have found a difference.

robocop10mm 01-09-2009 04:21 PM

Roll crimp for revolvers. Taper crimp for autos.

Oh, yeah. Brass. Remington has a rep for being too soft. Winchester has a rep for being inconsistant. Federal has a reputation for being too hard. These are reputations that may or may not be deserved. I use them all and have no real preference. I tend to load large batches (500-1000) and sort by headstamp. All the R-P gets boxed up together etc.

cpttango30 01-09-2009 11:13 PM

Crimping is spot on above.

About your noncrimped loads if you loaded them with any kind of relaoding die I have ever seen they are crimped. All 44mag relaoding dies give somekind of roll crimp.

As far as 8 or 10 gr we can't tell you anything because we do not know the weight of the bullet we would need to know the weight of the bullet to know if you are ok with 8 to 10 gr or unique. If you are shooting a 225 gr swc then you are way under charged according to alients web site. if you are shooting a 240gr swc then you are way over .

GET A GOOD RELAODING MANUAL NOW if you don't have one.

treillw 01-10-2009 08:32 PM

Thanks for the advise guys.

Something else that came up is I'm cleaning it with Hoppes #9 bore cleaner and it doesn't seem to be getting all of the powder residue off. The one box of cartridges I got had some cheap, dirty, powder in them. Is it ok to use the metal cleaning brush to scrub the residue off the front of the cylinder. When i got the gun, it was used, and really clean. I'd like to keep it that way.

robocop10mm 01-11-2009 04:52 PM

The residue on the cylinder face is particularly difficult to remove. If you want to return it to a new look, use a lead free cloth. It will erase the fouling quite easily. NEVER use the lead free cloth on a blued gun, it will remove bluing.

BILLYBOB44 01-23-2009 12:08 AM

Crimp for sure.
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by cpttango30 (Post 61133)
Crimping is spot on above.

About your noncrimped loads if you loaded them with any kind of relaoding die I have ever seen they are crimped. All 44mag relaoding dies give somekind of roll crimp.

As far as 8 or 10 gr we can't tell you anything because we do not know the weight of the bullet we would need to know the weight of the bullet to know if you are ok with 8 to 10 gr or unique. If you are shooting a 225 gr swc then you are way under charged according to alients web site. if you are shooting a 240gr swc then you are way over .

GET A GOOD RELAODING MANUAL NOW if you don't have one.

Right on tango. EVERY .44 load data sheet will tell you that a firm roll crimp is necessary. He may have the die body out too far to crimp, and the seater punch down enough to seat bullet. This will make for little/no crimp.:)

huntintoo 02-01-2009 10:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by treillw (Post 60834)
I just got an Anaconda 44 mag (first pistol) and started reloading pistol cartridges (first time), and I have a few questions.

Why are Semiwad Cutter bullets called so?

What advantages does crimping bullets offer? Do you get more velocity due to the bullet being held in the cartridge longer and the pressure growing? I loaded some some hornady hollow points with 17 grains of 2400 and I didn't crimp them and they seem to be ok. I'm planning on loading some SWC's with 8-10 grains of unique - Should I crimp them? Is 8 grains of powder enough or is 10 better?

Who makes the best brass? I got a pack of Remington brass for now.

I'm also looking for a nice soft holster that won't wear on the finish. Any Recommendations? I had a uncle mikes sidekick but it seemed pretty abrasive so I returned it.

Feel free to answer any of my many questions. Thanks

Wadcutter and Semi Wad cutter are usually Lead bullets (Cheaper than Jacketed) Both have a sharp per edge for cutting clean holes in paper and were designed for competition shooting. Semi's are longer out the top, wadcutters are flat with the brass.
Crimp is critical in most handguns. The others have stated correctly. It is harder on the brass for less of a long life. But accuracy first!
You'll find that working up a load(starting at the bottom and going up in .5 grain increments) bottomof the recomendations to top of the recomendations is the a bunch of the fun of reloading. Consistancy(Brass, Primer, Bullet, Powder) will always make you a better shooter. Find what you like and stick to it!
H110 works for both my .454 and .44 so I use it. but these are hunting loads not just for punching holes in paper. The faster you push a lead bullet the more build up in your barrell as friction causes heat as well as hot powder.
Unique is better for lead.
Any holster will wear the finish of a gun if pulled in and out enough. Cold bluing and keeping the gun clean will remove some of the abrassives, and keep your gun looking newer. Rather than concern on wear find one you can get the gun in and out of without the use of two hands(one will work).
My wife wishes I never started reloading. I get into the "zone" when I'm doing it and can't seem to find a stopping place. Just gotts get her shooting more:)!
Hope it helps!


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