Freeze drying


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Old 05-02-2007, 04:35 AM   #1
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Default Freeze drying

I've read threads about freeze drying ammo for long-term storage. Long-term I mean many years 2+.

What is everyone's take on this. Overkill or necessary?



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Old 05-02-2007, 05:11 AM   #2
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Completely unnecessary. Keep the ammo dry and cool and it will last longer than you. Back in the late 70's and early 80's we "found" a few crates of .303 British ammo that had stenciled on the sides of the boxes "Not For Use In Syncronized Machineguns After 1928".

The ammo was over 50 years old when we shot it and although we did have the odd FTF, it wasn't much worse than ammo that was only 10 years old.

My father is still using H4831 that he bought from Bruce Hodgdon in 1962 or '63 (he bought 100 lbs when he bought his then-brand-new 7mm RemMag).



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Old 05-03-2007, 02:15 AM   #3
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Agreed, completely unnecessary. Store it in sealed ammo boxes, either military surplus or plastic ones such as Cabela's dry boxes. That's what they're designed for.

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Old 05-03-2007, 11:20 AM   #4
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It sounds kind of silly to me. I would think that may have an adverse effect on the powder, and primers. Best way to store ammo in in a cool, dry place in sealed ammo cans. With perhaps a packet of silica crystals tossed in if you want to play it extra safe.

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Old 05-04-2007, 03:24 PM   #5
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Vaccum packing may help but I would not freeze dry.

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Old 07-03-2007, 01:27 PM   #6
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Default storage

I have .223 ammo that I loaded over 25 years ago and stored in sealed ammo cans. It works just as well now as it did then.

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Old 07-20-2007, 11:52 AM   #7
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Ditto w/ 7.62 x 39 old stuff works fine w/ no freeze drying required. Just keep dry and away from extreme temps.



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