cost to reload
Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > Gear & Accessories > Ammunition & Reloading > cost to reload

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-07-2011, 02:19 AM   #1
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
jjfuller1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: a place between here and there.
Posts: 4,452
Liked 1149 Times on 749 Posts
Likes Given: 688

Default cost to reload

hello, now im not super new to reloading, however my uncle (where i learned and did reloading) had alot of everything, powder primers brass, the presses dies. the only thing i ever had to buy was my bullets. now i wasnt into trying to make a perfect load. i just wanted to shoot lots of ammo and it was kinda fun. now that im older i am stuck. do i spend the six or seven hundred for everythingi need to meet my needs for reloading, or do i just put that money towards bulk ammo purchases. i dont really know what way i want to go. any opinions?

__________________
jjfuller1 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote

Join FirearmsTalk.com Today - It's Free!

Are you a firearms enthusiast? Then we hope you will join the community. You will gain access to post, create threads, private message, upload images, join groups and more.

Firearms Talk is owned and operated by fellow firearms enthusiasts. We strive to offer a non-commercial community to learn and share information.

Join FirearmsTalk.com Today! - Click Here


Old 07-07-2011, 02:58 AM   #2
Moderator
FTF_MODERATOR.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
robocop10mm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Austin,Texas, by God!!
Posts: 10,171
Liked 2831 Times on 1480 Posts
Likes Given: 251

Default

For me it is not about saving money (completely). I like to be self sufficient. I cast my own bullets for 18 different calibers as well as 12 ga slugs and buckshot. I have the necessary equipment to load all of the above as well as 7 other calibers. Some I don't even have guns for, yet.

I invested in my equipment starting in the early 80's so I have more than paid for my initial investment.

__________________

In life, strive to take the high road....It offers a better field of fire.
"Robo is right" Fuzzball

robocop10mm is online now  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2011, 03:09 AM   #3
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
CA357's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Oregon
Posts: 19,871
Liked 1175 Times on 510 Posts
Likes Given: 2978

Default

I'm in the same position as you are JJ. An RCBS Rockchucker press and starter kit is around $300. Then there are the dies and so on and the tumbler and other equipment. Then add powder, primers and bullets and it's a rather large initial investment.

Thankfully, I've been saving my brass for years, so at least I have that pretty much covered, but it is a lot of money at the outset. I figure to start by buying the press and then add components and the dies for .30-06 & .45ACP at first. I mostly shoot those two calibers, so that would do me quite well for a time.

Some time back I consolidated my firearms due to financial reasons, but also for practical reasons. I now have only three rifle calibers and three handgun calibers that I would have to reload for.

Perhaps you might buy the equipment in stages to soften the financial hit.

__________________
“If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen.”Samuel Adams
CA357 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2011, 03:26 AM   #4
Moderator
FTF_MODERATOR.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
JonM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Rochester WI,Rochester WI
Posts: 17,742
Liked 5795 Times on 3026 Posts
Likes Given: 394

Default

reloading setup is about the same as buying a new firearm.

i do it for three reasons.

primarily so i can put more rounds down range (nearly double) for the same amount as store bought.

second i do it to make match grade ammo i can tune specifically to one rifle

third i make my own hunting ammo with better bullets than is readily available on the shelf

i shoot several calibers that are prohibitively expensive off the shelf or are simply not available using certain bullets. for example its nearly 80$ for 20 rounds of 458 winmag shelf ammo i can make the same ammo for about 6$

with 5.56 i can make a thousand rounds for way less than half the cost of shelf ammo.

__________________

"Gun control: The theory that a woman found dead in an alley, raped and strangled with her panty hose, is somehow morally superior to a woman explaining to police how her attacker got that fatal bullet wound." — L. Neil Smith

The problem with being stupid is you cannot simply decide to stop doing dumb things...

JonM is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2011, 03:31 AM   #5
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Trez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: 3-P
Posts: 3,683
Liked 748 Times on 495 Posts
Likes Given: 820

Default

It depends what are you wanting ammo for? do you have guns that shoot odd calibers, are they big magnum calibers, or do you want just to do it?
I shoot lots of oddballs..( just try to ask for .30-40 or 7.7 Jap)

Once you get the equipment it can become inexpensive, but as many have said any money you save usually is spent on more reloading equipment.
With that said getting a kit doesnt have to be expensive, if your not picky a lee kit costs around $100, It has most everything you need to start reloading and are pretty decent. Check out Craigslist as well, I just got lucky and bought a entire reloading setup from a competition benchrest shooter for $400. Looking it all up I got about $800 - $1,000 worth of stuff, Its all Redding, RCBS, Sinclare, and Wilson equipment and all looks brand new, I even got the bench with it. Right now Im selling the dies I dont need to buy the ones I do. I see a few more reloading setups on Craigslist I wouldnt mind buying if I had the cash...

Its really up to you what you want to do. I would highly recommend it, its a very fascinating hobby and Ive been hooked ever since!!! Even me being a amateur I see the difference between the ammo I make and factory ... (You can do a lot better than surplus/factory ammo)

__________________
Quote:
...... I suffer from a very rare genetic defect that causes me to be sympathetic toward the International cause. There is no cure.
Trez is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2011, 09:00 PM   #6
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
jjfuller1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: a place between here and there.
Posts: 4,452
Liked 1149 Times on 749 Posts
Likes Given: 688

Default

thanks for the input.i think i was headed in the direction just needed this extra shove. im goin to go with a rcbs equipment. ive already used it. and if i need i can borrow my uncles dies.. hes had his rcbs for longer than i have memories. i will mainly be using it for .40 s & w , .308 9mm and .223. so i hopefully in a month or less i'll have enough to get started... i just have to get past the fact that i could have owned one more firearm instead. haha

__________________
jjfuller1 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2011, 10:35 PM   #7
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 124
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

I have been reloading since the 60's and have gone through equipment that no one now has ever heard of. I have everything needed to cast & reload and enjoy doing it occasionally when I want something special.

However, if you want to shoot something like 9mm, cost out the current price on components and what it takes to get them to the reloading bench. Now price a 100 round box of Winchester 9mm FMJ for $19.47, my last purchase price. It's not worth your time much less the investment of equipment for a new re-loader. If you cast, as I can, and figure your time worth nothing, you can still save some money, but otherwise when I go to the range I just shoot the stuff off the shelf.

__________________
Dragonheart is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2011, 12:35 AM   #8
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Phoenix metro
Posts: 47
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

go here to use the cost calculator for loading.
Handloading Cost Calculator
HTH
Bob

__________________
formerCav is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2011, 02:59 AM   #9
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Trez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: 3-P
Posts: 3,683
Liked 748 Times on 495 Posts
Likes Given: 820

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by formerCav View Post
go here to use the cost calculator for loading.
Handloading Cost Calculator
HTH
Bob
That is Awsome!!!! Thumbs up!!

Using this I figured out im only paying $4.00 for 50 for .30-40 Krag, way better than $35.00 for 20!!
__________________
Quote:
...... I suffer from a very rare genetic defect that causes me to be sympathetic toward the International cause. There is no cure.

Last edited by Trez; 07-08-2011 at 03:03 AM.
Trez is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2011, 08:02 PM   #10
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 124
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Maybe I am missing something, but I have been reloading for over 40 years and I don't see how you can reload a hundred rounds of anything in this economy for $8.00 a hundred unless you cast your own, get the lead for free, figure your equipment has no value and your time as nothing.

The reloading calculator is nice, but you need to put in "real" numbers to make it work. I am basing the component costs on mail order as that is still the least expensive way to buy components.

First, the primers, which are running approximately $24 to $32.50 per thousand, equals a low of 2-1/2 cents a round and you still have not included shipping and Hazmat fees. Next the powder, using a less expensive powder and a small charge like in a 9mm cartridge will still run about 1-1/2 cents per round and once again there are shipping and Hazmat fees to be added. Now the big kicker, the bullet! 9mm FMJ bullets are 12 to 14 cents per round and that doesn't include shipping, which is not cheap. Plated bullets are a little cheaper at about 8 cents, but defensive bullets are much more expensive.

We will assume you already have the brass, if not you can figure about 16 cents for a new 9mm case. So add up a low end base cost and you get $0.16 a round for a popular small 9mm cartridge and as stated you don't actually have the components in hand because shipping and Hazmat fees . Put it all together and you are looking at a real cost of about 20 cents a round or $20 a hundred. That's a long way from $8 and certainly not a rifle cartridge.

Change out that small powder charge for a rifle and a big rifle bullet and you have doubled that cost.

__________________
Dragonheart is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Firearms Forum Replies Last Post
Why does a 357 or 44 Mag cost more then a 30-30?? spittinfire The Club House 16 01-20-2010 11:48 AM
Want to reload laynejc Ammunition & Reloading 6 02-07-2009 07:05 PM
Reloading Cost Breakdown For .223. Does It "Pay" To Reload? billt Ammunition & Reloading 7 07-28-2008 02:51 PM
Cost of SKS Starduck AK & SKS Discussion 5 05-07-2008 10:55 PM