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Old 12-16-2013, 04:19 AM   #51
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Old 12-16-2013, 05:04 AM   #52
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My favorite also. Any rifleman is very likely going to fall for the 25-06. Way back in 1920 A.O. Niedner invented the 25-06 Wild Cat. It would take 49 years for the ".25 Niedner" to be legitimized by Remington Arms in 1969.
I first encountered the 25-06 in the early 1960s. I was using the .243 Winchester for long range "Rock Chuck" shooting in the Big Horn Mountains above the "Hole in the Wall". I needed a long range varmint and Mule deer and Antelope rifle. The 25-06 was my choice. I have owned a pair of 25-06 rifles for the past 40 years. One a HB varmint rig and one aged Sako hunting rifle. Combining a Sako rifle and the 25-06 cartridge is a joy to own.
The 25-06 loaded with a 75 gr. HP is a bomb on any varmint. Bullets in the 117 gr. range can reach an Antelope way out on the Desert.

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Old 12-16-2013, 08:24 AM   #53
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More about the .280 please. You guys were almost romantic delivering info.

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Old 12-16-2013, 09:19 PM   #54
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More about the .280 please. You guys were almost romantic delivering info.
not a whole lot more to say. it's just a great cartridge that first came out in rifles that didn't optimize on it's potential, until they started putting them into a bolt action and then found it's potential. sadly, it will probably never reach the popularity the 270 or the 7mm Mag. have achieved.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.280_Remington

ahhhh.... the 25-06! another one of my favorites! bought my first one in about the late 1980's, chambered in a Remington M700, wood stocked ADL. absolutely fell in love with it. bought mine for coyote removal. great cartridge for most small to medium sized game. if you handload, it can even be used as a varmint round with smaller weight bullets.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.25-06_Remington
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Old 12-19-2013, 06:15 AM   #55
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The .38 Short Colt. While this round is almost nonexistent today, we are still being effected by the legacy it began. It originally used heeled bullet (like a .22s, it later used non heeled bullets instead), and was intended to be used in .36 caliber cap and ball conversions. This round was definitively not a man stopper though. It fired a bullet in the 125-135gr range, at about 770 FPS, producing a measly 165 FT-LBF of energy.



By adding about .266" to the 38 Short Colts case length, the 38 Long Colt was born. The main advantage of the 38 Long Colt over the 38 Short Colt was that you could use heavier bullets at a similar velocity. The 38 Long Colt fired a 150gr bullet at 770 FPS producing 198 FT-LBF. While it was more powerful than the 38 Short Colt, it was still pretty weak. This became painfully evident during the Philippine-American War of 1899–1902 where the 38 Long Colt was not able to effectively stop the frenzied Moro juramentados.

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Antonio Caspi, a prisoner on the island of Samar, P.I. attempted escape on Oct. 26, 1905. He was shot four times at close range in a hand-to-hand encounter by a .38 Colt's revolver loaded with U.S. Army regulation ammunition. He was finally stunned by a blow on the forehead from the butt end of a Springfield carbine.
-Col. Louis A. LaGarde
This eventually resulted in the creation of the 45 ACP.



In 1898, .124" of case length was added to the 38 Long Colt, creating a round that is still popular today. The 38 Special. The 38 Special was created as a result of the 38 Long Colt's poor performance. Originally a black powder cartridge, smokeless powder began being used instead within a year of it's introduction. Firing a 158gr bullet at 770 FPS, it produced 208 FT-LBF of energy. Not long after it's introduction, the 38 Special became a common round for both military and police use, and civilian self defense use.



In 1934, .135" was added to the .38 Special creating an extremely powerful round that started the magnum era of handgun ammo. The .357 Magnum. Created by Elmer Keith, Phillip B. Sharpe, and Colonel D. B. Wesson, the .357 could fire a 158 gr bullet at 1485 FPS, producing 774 FT-LBF of energy. Soon the .357 Mag, like the 38 Special, became popular with civilians and police alike. To this day, it is still an extremely popular round for everything from plinking, to self defense.

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Old 12-19-2013, 06:30 AM   #56
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Originally Posted by texaswoodworker View Post
The .38 Short Colt. While this round is almost nonexistent today, we are still being effected by the legacy it began. It originally used heeled bullet (like a .22s, it later used non heeled bullets instead), and was intended to be used in .36 caliber cap and ball conversions. This round was definitively not a man stopper though. It fired a bullet in the 125-135gr range, at about 770 FPS, producing a measly 165 FT-LBF of energy.

By adding about .266" to the 38 Short Colts case length, the 38 Long Colt was born. The main advantage of the 38 Long Colt over the 38 Short Colt was that you could use heavier bullets at a similar velocity. The 38 Long Colt fired a 150gr bullet at 770 FPS producing 198 FT-LBF. While it was more powerful than the 38 Short Colt, it was still pretty weak. This became painfully evident during the Philippine-American War of 1899–1902 where the 38 Long Colt was not able to effectively stop the frenzied Moro juramentados.

This eventually resulted in the creation of the 45 ACP.

In 1898, .124" of case length was added to the 38 Long Colt, creating a round that is still popular today. The 38 Special. The 38 Special was created as a result of the 38 Long Colt's poor performance. Originally a black powder cartridge, smokeless powder began being used instead within a year of it's introduction. Firing a 158gr bullet at 770 FPS, it produced 208 FT-LBF of energy. Not long after it's introduction, the 38 Special became a common round for both military and police use, and civilian self defense use.

In 1934, .135" was added to the .38 Special creating an extremely powerful round that started the magnum era of handgun ammo. The .357 Magnum. Created by Elmer Keith, Phillip B. Sharpe, and Colonel D. B. Wesson, the .357 could fire a 158 gr bullet at 1485 FPS, producing 774 FT-LBF of energy. Soon the .357 Mag, like the 38 Special, became popular with civilians and police alike. To this day, it is still an extremely popular round for everything from plinking, to self defense.
This was an awesome story! I'd heard of the rounds and that they lead to the .45 but I wasn't aware of the specifics of it all. I enjoyed reading it.
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Old 12-19-2013, 08:46 PM   #57
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very good write-up TWW!

very informative and well done. thank you for the information.

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Old 12-19-2013, 09:39 PM   #58
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And then we went a bit too far (maybe) In 1983, the case was stretched again to 1.603, and the 357 Maximum was born. However, when using relatively light (125 gr, 110 g) bullets, problems developed with flame cutting of the top strap of the revolver, and major makers dropped the caliber from production.


Bullet weight

Velocity

Energy

158 grains 1825 ft/s 1168 ft·lbf
180 grains 1550 ft/s 960 ft·lbf

357maximumand357magnum.jpg
.357 Max next to a .357 Mag


Revolvers chambered for .357 Maximum could fire all of the aforementioned rounds.

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Old 12-19-2013, 09:53 PM   #59
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And then we went a bit too far (maybe) In 1983, the case was stretched again to 1.603, and the 357 Maximum was born. However, when using relatively light (125 gr, 110 g) bullets, problems developed with flame cutting of the top strap of the revolver, and major makers dropped the caliber from production.


Bullet weight

Velocity

Energy

158 grains 1825 ft/s 1168 ft·lbf
180 grains 1550 ft/s 960 ft·lbf

Attachment 129899
.357 Max next to a .357 Mag


Revolvers chambered for .357 Maximum could fire all of the aforementioned rounds.
IIRC, the 357 Maximum didn't catch on in popularity either and not a whole lot of pistols were made.

now a T/C Contender in 357 Maximum would be pretty cool though!
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Old 12-20-2013, 01:25 AM   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c3shooter View Post
And then we went a bit too far (maybe) In 1983, the case was stretched again to 1.603, and the 357 Maximum was born. However, when using relatively light (125 gr, 110 g) bullets, problems developed with flame cutting of the top strap of the revolver, and major makers dropped the caliber from production.


Bullet weight

Velocity

Energy

158 grains 1825 ft/s 1168 ft·lbf
180 grains 1550 ft/s 960 ft·lbf

Attachment 129899
.357 Max next to a .357 Mag


Revolvers chambered for .357 Maximum could fire all of the aforementioned rounds.
One of the few the Medusa cant shoot.. The cylinder isnt long enough!
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