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-   -   Best ammo for hunting birds with a 10/22? (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f30/best-ammo-hunting-birds-10-22-a-34995/)

corrinavatan 11-30-2010 05:08 AM

Best ammo for hunting birds with a 10/22?
 
... title is pretty self-evident. I have a crow problem on my property, and really don't want to deal with buying a shotgun to take them out.

spittinfire 11-30-2010 12:26 PM

Here in NC hunting any bird with a rifle is a no-no. However, if you've got crows and can safely shoot them I think any high velocity 22 would do the job inside 50 yards. If you want something with a little more zip try a Stinger or Velociter, both are hard hitting 22s.

whtsmoke 11-30-2010 12:48 PM

what you need to do is invite a group of guys(or gals) that like to down and i bet they would help you out. We use to hunt crows all the time when we were kids with bith 22 and a shotgun. yes you can use a 22 on them as long as you jknow where that bullet is going.

c3shooter 11-30-2010 02:26 PM

Umm- Crows are a Federally regulated non-migratory non-game bird. While rifles may NOT be used for doves, Geese, ducks, they are generally permitted for crows. However, do check game laws- last time I looked, there is an every-other-day legal shooting time for them.

I use polymer tip .17 HMR (POOOOF!!!) but the most accurate .22 LR for YOUR rifle would be my suggestion.

gadrooning 11-30-2010 03:04 PM

Personally I would not hunt crows with a 22 unless you have a solid back drop to stop the bullets and I definitely would not shoot up into the air as .22 will and come back down with possible lethal force. However here is trick from the past. place bait in a large open box or an open frame of some sort. Place an old fishing net with the openings roughly the size of the head of a crow, draped over the bait. The net has to be suspended over the bait a few inches above the bait so the crows have to place there heads through the net to get at it. This will give you several more seconds to ambush them. And ambush them you have to as they are smart, very smart. Keep an eye out for the scout. This is the crow sitting up in a higher vantage point keeping an eye out while the rest of the flock eats. If he sees you the gigs up. Keep in mind that crows are scavengers so like many animals in this category they look at you from side of their head not the front. Most people mistake this thinking that if the crows head is turned away that they cannot see you. Unlike predators, whose eyes are located in front of their heads like you and I, cats, dogs, eagles, scavengers have eyes located on the side their head very much like grazers, so they actually have more field of vision. Crows have better eyesight than you or I so keep in mind if you can see them more than likely they can see you. I would use a 12 or 20 gauge duck shot to knock those bastards out. Here in Mich. you are allowed to hunt crows. These are probably one of the post plentiful birds next to the Michigan mosquito.

corrinavatan 11-30-2010 03:51 PM

I had actually heard of bird shot available for 22 LRs; the fact that nobody has mentioned these rounds makes me think that they are either ineffective, rare, or damage the gun.

If I shoot them with actual slugs, I plan on only shooting them at a downward angle (my property is such that I can place myself on a ridge and aim down at them). If they start flying, I plan on being out of luck.

Thankfully, (or rather, not), I won't need to bait them. For whatever reason, they're constantly around the same area of a field, which I wouldn't mind if they didn't constantly fly north throughout the day, crapping all over my house, car, and in my swimming pool.

I figure they're probably just like any other bird and will taste good roasted in the oven with a can of beer inside them, and they're legal to hunt with a permit.

Overkill0084 11-30-2010 06:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by corrinavatan (Post 394577)
I had actually heard of bird shot available for 22 LRs; the fact that nobody has mentioned these rounds makes me think that they are either ineffective, rare, or damage the gun.

If I shoot them with actual slugs, I plan on only shooting them at a downward angle (my property is such that I can place myself on a ridge and aim down at them). If they start flying, I plan on being out of luck.

Thankfully, (or rather, not), I won't need to bait them. For whatever reason, they're constantly around the same area of a field, which I wouldn't mind if they didn't constantly fly north throughout the day, crapping all over my house, car, and in my swimming pool.

I figure they're probably just like any other bird and will taste good roasted in the oven with a can of beer inside them, and they're legal to hunt with a permit.

It's been a few years, but as I recall those shot loads for .22s are only good out to maybe 20 feet. Great for hiking in snake country, but not a proper game load in the traditional sense.

spittinfire 11-30-2010 06:23 PM

You aren't actually planning to eat them are you?

corrinavatan 11-30-2010 06:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spittinfire (Post 394652)
You aren't actually planning to eat them are you?

Is there a reason why I shouldn't? Like, are they radioactive or something?

Why in the world would I not eat an animal that I shot? That just seems wasteful to me. I mean, it's a bird.

hunter Joe 11-30-2010 06:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by corrinavatan (Post 394656)
Is there a reason why I shouldn't? Like, are they radioactive or something?

Why in the world would I not eat an animal that I shot? That just seems wasteful to me.

Skunks and opossums are non-game animals. Yes I shoot them and no I don't eat them. Why should a pesky crow be any different?

As for game animals, if I'm not going to eat them, I don't hunt them. Varmints and pests fall under another catogory IMHO and crows are no better than rats with wings.


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