Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > Long Guns > General Shotgun Discussion > Another one to help ID!

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-27-2010, 02:14 PM   #1
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 3
Default Another one to help ID!

I have one more I need help identifying the model.

Remington 12 gauge 1100 series. Trying to resolve whether this is a base model, LT-20, LT-20 Magum, ....

A. 12 gauge, chambered for 3" shells.
B. S/N 551270M
C. Has "Magnum" on right side of the receiver. I thought it as a LT-20 Magnum, but that model only came in 28" barrels....mine is a 30".
D. Checkered walnut stock. Front grips are plastic with matching pattern from stock.
E. Remington ventilated recoil pad (diamond pattern ventilation).

Anything else I need to specify, let me know. Thanks again for your help...I got these two shotguns from a friend's Dad who passed away and his son doesn't like guns. I can't argue with free!

Thanks, guys!

Aaron



__________________
gqusaf is offline  
 
Reply With Quote

Join FirearmsTalk.com Today - It's Free!

Are you a firearms enthusiast? Then we hope you will join the community. You will gain access to post, create threads, private message, upload images, join groups and more.

Firearms Talk is owned and operated by fellow firearms enthusiasts. We strive to offer a non-commercial community to learn and share information.

Join FirearmsTalk.com Today! - Click Here


Old 03-27-2010, 02:37 PM   #2
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Dzscubie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: El Paso,Texas
Posts: 2,521
Liked 39 Times on 19 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Without pictures we can't really help you. How about going to the intro section and tell the forum a little about yourself, we like to help just want to know who we're helping.



__________________
"I never killed anyone who didn't need killing."
JW Hardin
Dzscubie is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2010, 02:18 PM   #3
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 973
Default

In fact you probably do have that model. The barrel was probably changed by a previous owner. Back in the day, longer barrels were better, but that's not necessarily true today.

__________________
UnderFire is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2010, 06:44 PM   #4
Moderator
FTF_MODERATOR.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
robocop10mm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Austin,Texas, by God!!
Posts: 9,888
Liked 2552 Times on 1339 Posts
Likes Given: 192

Default

Be sure you are measuring the barrel correctly. The length is measured from breach face to muzzle. The best way to do so is close the breech on an empty chamber, take a cleaning rod and insert it into the muzzle until it contacts the breech face. Mark the cleaning rod with a sharpie at the end of the barrel. Remove the cleaning rod and measure.

Are you sure the magnum model was never offered with a 30" barrel? Details of each model change periodically so that may have been an option at one time. Check the serial number through Remingtom to see exactly how it left the factory.

__________________

In life, strive to take the high road....It offers a better field of fire.
"Robo is right" Fuzzball

robocop10mm is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2010, 07:08 PM   #5
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Missileman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Omaha,Nebraska
Posts: 492
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Sounds like you have an older Model 1100 Magnum, especially if the stock checkering is pressed and not cut--it was made for lead shot 3 inch 12 gauge shells. Not sure about the front grip, it must have been an after-market addition as I know of none in plastic from the factory. Most came with a 30 inch full choke barrel. (The Lt-20 Magnum only came in 20 gauge, the difference being that the original 20 gauge 1100s were built on the 12 gauge receiver, the Lt-20s came with a smaller receiver.)

__________________
Dave

"Adversity does not make a man--it reveals him"
Missileman is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2010, 07:47 PM   #6
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 973
Default

Missleman, Wasn't the older 1100 models offered with 2 3/4 receivers only? 3" came later

__________________
UnderFire is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2010, 09:06 PM   #7
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Missileman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Omaha,Nebraska
Posts: 492
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by UnderFire View Post
Missleman, Wasn't the older 1100 models offered with 2 3/4 receivers only? 3" came later
Good catch--I guess when I said older I should have qualified that. I believe when the 1100 came out in 1963 it was available in standard 2 3/4 and 3-inch magnum versions--I believe the 3 inchers were called the Magnum Duck Gun originally. That's what I refered to as "older", with the pressed checkering and Dupont finish on the stock. I believe the newer models had cut checkering and satin finishes, but Remington released what seems like hundreds of variations and commemoritive models. They are one of the all time great shotguns, and my favorite skeet and trap guns still today.
__________________
Dave

"Adversity does not make a man--it reveals him"
Missileman is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2010, 01:22 AM   #8
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 973
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Missileman View Post
Good catch--I guess when I said older I should have qualified that. I believe when the 1100 came out in 1963 it was available in standard 2 3/4 and 3-inch magnum versions--I believe the 3 inchers were called the Magnum Duck Gun originally. That's what I refered to as "older", with the pressed checkering and Dupont finish on the stock. I believe the newer models had cut checkering and satin finishes, but Remington released what seems like hundreds of variations and commemoritive models. They are one of the all time great shotguns, and my favorite skeet and trap guns still today.
Missileman,
You're correct with your info. on the early model 1100's and your OP about the LT-20. I belong to another forum which is all Remington, all-the-time. I was waiting to hear from a Rem. guru and this is what he has to say...

Quote:
In 1977, Remington introduced a new, redesigned Model 1100 20 gauge Lightweight (called LT-20) in Field Grade, Magnum and Skeet versions. These guns are visually distinguishable from previous 20 gauge models by the contoured ejection port (long barrel extension).
1978
The Model 1100 LT-20 (20 gauge) is available in a Field Grade version. Formerly, this gun was built on a larger 12 gauge frame. Concurrently, the Model 1100 20 gauge left-hand version was dropped, and was not available in LT-20 versions. The new Model 1100 LT-20 Deer gun replaced the older, large receiver 20 gauge Deer gun. The new gun had a 20", improved cylinder barrel with rifle sights. Stocks on all Model 1100 LT-20 Field guns now were being made of walnut instead of mahogany.
1980
Remington introduced the Model 1100 LT-20 "Limited", a 20 gauge lightweight Model 1100 Field gun with stock 1- inches shorter than standard, and 23" barrel for youthful, beginner shooters of smaller stature. This year Remington also introduced special Skeet weight-equalizer kits for Model 1100 410 bore, 28 gauge and LT 20 Skeet guns. The weightequalizer kits were intended to give the three smaller gauge Model 1100s nearly identical balance and point-ability of the larger and heavier 12 gauge version.
1982
Added to the line was a 28" modified barrel for the Model 1100 LT-20 (20 gauge Lightweight).
1984
The Model 1100 LT-20 Limited name was changed to Model 1100 LT-20 Youth Gun with a change of the barrel length to 21".

One way to date your Model 1100 shotgun is to locate the code on the left side of the barrel, just forward of the receiver. The first letter indicates the month of production, and the second letter indicates the year of production. By wary, though, as many guns have replacement barrels. [See the 2005 edition number 26,of the Blue Book of Gun Values, page 1,893. ]

Model 1100 serial numbers (on the receiver) started with the number 1001. All but the early guns also have a prefix letter. All Model 1100 Remington shotguns were serial numbered in blocks of numbers. Each serial number has a suffix and the following indicates the meaning:

V = 12ga. standard 2" frame/receiver
M = 12ga. magnum 3" frame/receiver
W= 16ga. 2" frame/receiver
X = 20 ga. 2" frame/receiver
N = 20 ga. magnum 3" frame/receiver
K = 20 ga. lightweight 2" frame/receiver (LW)
K = 20 ga. lightweight 2" frame/receiver (LT)
U = 20 ga. lightweight magnum 3" frame/receiver
J = 28ga. 2" frame/receiver
H = .410 3" frame/receiver

In my opinion, the Model 1100 is the best autoloading shotgun ever produced. Ithas light recoil, it points better than any other shotgun I know, and if it is well maintained, it remain trouble free. I shot a Model 1100 Trap B, for sixteen years and only switched to the Model 1187, when the Model 1100 trap guns were discontinued in 1987. I still use a 1971 vintage 20 gauge Model 1100 LW in the field, with an improved cylinder choke. True, some of the finish has worn off the wood and the receiver. It may not look as good as it once did, but it sure points and shootswell enough for me to bag my limit time after time. The Remington Model 1100 is one fine gun.
To the OP,
Hope this helps...this guy knows his stuff!!
He's been a big help to me & others on the Remington Forum.


__________________
UnderFire is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes