Uberti Colt 1862 Police Pocket-caps not firing reliably? - Page 2
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Uberti Colt 1862 Police Pocket-caps not firing reliably?


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Old 10-25-2010, 12:02 AM   #11
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Here is the setup I use, Caps Remington # 10, Ball rounds 454 44 cal. powder
FFFG American Pioneer. and it works great , I use it for re-enacting and to hog hunt.

Uberti Colt 1862 Police Pocket-caps not firing reliably? - Blackpowder & Musket


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Old 10-25-2010, 07:41 PM   #12
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I use the same model ,only mine is a San-Marco,I purshased that gun in 1994 and shoot it as much as possible
Uberti Colt 1862 Police Pocket-caps not firing reliably? - Blackpowder & Musket


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Old 10-27-2010, 04:50 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Johnny45 View Post
Thanks (to everyone). I can't try any new brands until I get a day off, but I did go out side and try using the hammer to push the caps down. I only tried 4 caps, because this is a "residential" area, and people seem paranoid around here. Anyway, the first one I tried didn't go off first strike, but I think I may have pushed it down too hard, or something. But the next three went off fine, which is better than it's done so far!
I plan to number the cylinders (mentally, at least) using the small proof mark next to one of the bores. That way I can keep track if any of them fire less reliably than the others. I don't SEE any obvious sign of "flaring" but then again I don't have anything to compare them too. Maybe Google can find some photos of brand-new #10 nipples.
One thing I do know, is that I personally accidentally let the hammer fall on an empty nipple when I was cleaning all the grease off of it. Is one dry strike enough to damage a nipple? I avoid dry firing guns in any case, but it seems like they should have put a warning in the instructions, or something.

Another thing, I was looking at the nipples and hammer, and I noticed that the face of the hammer has a small "bump" right where the notch for engaging the "safety peg" opens onto it...is that normal? Or is it supposed to be totally flat? It's not very big, but the bump hits the cap right in the center, where the nipple hole is. It seems to me that a cap would want to be hit evenly all around the EDGES, where the nipple can act as an anvil. I wonder if that tiny bump could be putting the force into the CENTER of the cap, and draining the hammers energy before it hits the edges? Then, the next strike, it's already dented the center, so it hits the edges hard enough to fire them?
Like I said, it's barely visible, but could it hurt to take a small file and gently smooth it down a little? In any case, I'll have to look closely at any caps that fail to fire, and see if they are dented in the center at all.

One more thing...are caps supposed to burst when they fire? I thought that was normal, or something, but I noticed that a guy on some website was bitching that CCI caps burst all the time and jammed up his gun. Most of the caps I've fired have split wide open, and indeed the pieces do jam things up a little sometimes. I thought it was just one more thing they never show "in the movies", but now I wonder if that's even normal.
I am glad I read all the posts. I was just about to advise you to have a gunsmith check the hammer for eveness. Many of the Italian black powder replica guns have hammers that are cast or investment cast and they have flash or uneven surfaces on the face of the hammer. The best way to check that is to put some old fashion carbon paper on the nipple and then push the hammer down as hard as possible on the nipple (not with a cap on it) The hammer should have a round black mark on it. Anything less than that means the hammer needs to be squared off. If you try to do it yourself, remember to not take to much off. And keep checking with the carbon paper. If you go to far you may end up with a hammer that will not reach the cap. Good luck. The alternate is to dress down the nipples using the same carbon paper.
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Old 10-27-2010, 12:38 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by sarge_257 View Post
I am glad I read all the posts. I was just about to advise you to have a gunsmith check the hammer for eveness. Many of the Italian black powder replica guns have hammers that are cast or investment cast and they have flash or uneven surfaces on the face of the hammer. The best way to check that is to put some old fashion carbon paper on the nipple and then push the hammer down as hard as possible on the nipple (not with a cap on it) The hammer should have a round black mark on it. Anything less than that means the hammer needs to be squared off. If you try to do it yourself, remember to not take to much off. And keep checking with the carbon paper. If you go to far you may end up with a hammer that will not reach the cap. Good luck. The alternate is to dress down the nipples using the same carbon paper.
Sarge
Now, that is good advice! Thanks a lot; I never would have thought of that. "Practical" isn't my strongest point! I haven't had a chance to mess with it yet, luckily...I was just going to do it by eye and cross my fingers. I have a feeling your method will work better.
So, I have a feeling that this may well be the problem...I'll just have to wait and see.
BTW, is it possible for the hammer to be a little off-center? I can't see anything specific, but sometimes when you lower the hammer, it has enough "play" side-to-side to touch the side of the recess a little. Could it be hitting a little when I pull the trigger, which is absorbing some of the power? Seems a bit unlikely, but it's gotta be SOMETHING. I notice that the screw that holds the hammer in the action seems to stick out slightly on the left side, and the end is indented a little on the right side...does that sound normal, or should I try and see if it won't tighten a little?
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Old 11-01-2010, 06:09 PM   #15
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Nope that is not normal. Actually it may be for Italian copies of Colts. If you have a sloppy hammer, (movement side to side) you can center it or contain the movement to just enough to let the hammer fall normally, by putting shims on what ever side it appears to be to far from center. Shims can be obtained from Brownell, Montezuma, Iowa. They have a web site. You will have to cut the shims with some small sissors so they will not stick out and you will need to have a hole in the shim so it will be trapped by the hammer screw(pin). The best way to get the hole in the shim without messing it up, is to put it between two pieces of thin wood, (1/4" or so) and drill a hole that will be the same size as the hammer pin. or maybe a few thousands over. Then cut the shim to size. Drill several holes so you will have extra shims should the hammer need more than one shim.
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