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Old 02-23-2012, 10:32 PM   #21
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Default Pattern 1853

Well old man, wait no longer...

The third gun in the series is this Euroarms P-53. It is a London Armory-marked lock representing the second most popular type of arm in the US Civil War but which came from the UK.

The gun has been fired but is in excellent condition. Almost certainly this was only occasionally carried by a re-enactor or someone who did demonstrations only, most of whom never actually fire bullets from their guns. This has very limited evidence of any cap use and the rifling itself is mint. The blued barrel has thin and shallow scratches at the muzzle (I took the tompion out) from fixing and unfixing a bayonet. The walnut wood is nice, particularly the highly grained buttstock, and shows minor handling marks. Ignore the attachment of the well-used sling.

Sharp case-hardened lockplate! The only issue I have is that the hammer is not quite centered on the nipple -- the nipple hits just inside the hammer's cup on the right side and I can move the hammer a bit to center it but it goes right back...

These .577 arms have a 38-1/2" barrel.

This is not my only P-53 repro, and I even have an original Tower and bayonet, but I took a liking to this one's trigger as it is the best on a Euroarms I have ever noticed (despite the hammer).

Pic of the first three guns in this thread below as well...


http://www.hackman-adams.com/guns/enfield.htm


"P-1853 Enfield - There are two patterns of bullet for this arm and there may be variations of the second type. Specimens of this type showed the greatest regularity in weight than the bullets of any other nation.
Type 1 - The "Pritchett." This was the original design, in fact, the rifle was originally referred to as the "Enfield-Pritchett." The bullet was designed to act without an expansion plug or cup by the combined effect of the gases, acting in the hollow base, and the inertia of the bullet, which momentarily held it in position while the end was deformed by the gas pressure. Unfortunately, the concept which worked well in trials did not stand up to active service in the Crimea where the rifle was found inferior to the P-51.

Type 2 - The "iron cup" Enfield. A report made on May 12, 1855, stated: 'The condition of the service ammunition for the rifle 1853, from the trials made, was found to be very unsatisfactory.... In order, therefore, to correct any imperfection which may exist, either in diameter of bullet or bore of barrel, it is desirable to adopt at once an iron cup in the Pritchett bullet, as in the Minie [1851] to insure increased expansion. Experiments are now being conducted at the School of Musketry to test the efficiency of the Pritchett bullet (fitted with an iron cup), the result of which shall be reported in a few days.'"
bp-rifles-posted-1-2-3.jpg   euroarms-london-armory-rifle-musket-comp.jpg  

Last edited by HockaLouis; 02-25-2012 at 04:27 PM.
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Old 02-26-2012, 01:25 PM   #22
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I didn't realize this was a musket and rifle thread. Sorry guys
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Old 03-02-2012, 07:19 AM   #23
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I don't remember anyone saying this was long gun only so here's my first entry in the one-a-week parade.

This is a real deal (not a reproduction) BP pistol I picked up at a local gun show several months ago. The gun is a nickle plated, 6 shot pinfire revolver in 9mm that's in EXCELLENT condition and operates perfectly. I was able to research a fair amount of information about it and discovered from a proof mark on the cylinder that the revolver was made in the city of Liège, Belgium and "ELG" is the proof mark used by this city from 1811 until 1893. It also has the letter "L" with a crown above it showing it was made between 1853 and January 1877. I was a bit surprised when the dealer was discussing how rare the guns are suppose to be yet there were three at the gun show in January that I saw for sale. All were selling for $250 or less so I picked the best one. Mine was marked at $250 and the seller dropped the price $50 when I started counting out new twenty dollar bills.
pinfire1.jpg   pinfire2.jpg  
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Old 03-03-2012, 12:50 AM   #24
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now THAT is a cool pistol!
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Old 03-03-2012, 01:10 AM   #25
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I like that little French Curve at the back of the grip. I'll get to the next post in a minute...
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Old 03-03-2012, 01:24 AM   #26
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Default Pedersoli Frontier

I'd been looking for one of these for awhile...

But first, a disclaimer: I am a big fan of Pedersoli products and just wish they were less expensive though generally a good value for what they are.

This is a NIB Pedersoli Frontier (1760-1840) standard flintlock. This 7-1/4 lb., 39" barreled, double set trigger Southern-style leaning .50 is a gem. Like most Pedersolis, maybe all, the fit and finish is excellent. And this arm is particularly graceful. I was already shooting the rock-solid 6-1/2 lb. 36" single trigger .50 Kentucky (short pic below is the Kentucky) of the same period which I love (so well balanced) but it was all I was comfortable with in a full (non-swamped) octagonal barrel vs. their 41-1/2" later period Pennsylvania rifle which is everywhere. The latter is too front heavy for me despite my manly physique and are a later Federalist period design I don't want anyway.

This Frontier is in between those two in length/weight, was extant during the French & Indian/Revolutionary War (which I prefer), but admittedly is pushing the front-heavy envelope weight-wise (a little like me maybe -- lol). I can just manage to keep its buckhorn sights figure-eighting on target pleasantly. This is a traditional, quintessential, American arm w/a browned barrel and nice case-hardened lock in a decent walnut stock with brass furniture -- sharp and classic! And it is my favored flint caliber. Plus, I got it in a deal with some nice stuff like a flask, measure, starter, ball, flints (agate actually), worm, jag, ball-puller...

PS: If you are looking for a quality flintlock of this era that is remarkable and not custom made, but pretty enough to be, and with limited options to boot, I would recommend this arm. Being a commercially made arm by a big manufacturer is NOT a disadvantage my friends! F&I/Rev. War re-enactors can certainly appreciate this arm. Mine is a basic shooter. Calibers start from .36 and can be had in .54. Prices range from upper $600's to almost $1,300 depending on wood and furniture (there are Maple and Deluxe models: see Cherry's website). Cabela's Blue Ridge Flintlock is apparently the same gun. I will have something else to say on this gun with the next post in my thread.
pedersoli-frontier.jpg   pedersoli-kentucky-flintlock-rifle.jpg   pedersoli-flint-rifle-comp-3.jpg  

Last edited by HockaLouis; 03-03-2012 at 03:29 PM. Reason: Add addn'l pics and "PS"
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Old 03-06-2012, 02:07 PM   #27
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Time for my next entry in the gun of the week club.

Here's my Webley MP model in .450 Davis. It was made from 1880-1883 and carried by the Metropolitan Police (Scotland Yard) of London. My uncle Bob - I was named after him FWIW - got it when he was stationed with British troops during WWII and it was given to my grandfather when my uncle returned home from the war. The revolver was returned to my uncle when my grandfather died in the late 1960's and my uncle gave it to my mother (his sister) about 10 years ago when he entered a retirement home at age 90. My mother kept it until her death about a year ago. My sister found the gun in a shoebox, hidden in the back of a bedroom closet, gave the gun to me and I've had it since.

It was the first handgun I ever shot when I was a teen in the 1960's. It not only has a history of it's own (my Webley was probably carried by one of the London detectives looking for Jack the Ripper in the late 1880's), but has a history with my family that predates any of my relatives alive today. I had it checked out by a local gunsmith and it still works as well as the day my uncle gave it to my grandfather almost 70 years ago.
webley1.jpg   webley2.jpg  
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Old 03-10-2012, 02:29 AM   #28
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Default The Hatfields and...

The fifth gun is something special (to me anyway): it was a NIB Hatfield .50 flintlock rifle.

This beautiful reddish hue maple-stocked gun is the product of the 80's started Hatfield (yes, of "the Hatfields and McCoys" infamy) enterprise which was meticulously copied from an original family gun as a "custom production" piece.

That was Ted Hatfield's mission -- to make custom-quality guns on a semi-production basis by using the most advanced technology available to a small shop to inexpensively produce their own custom parts and do as much of the core, basic, and rough work as possible with it (i.e. on a CNC machine) and then finish them by hand so they could charge a fair price for premium arms and sell enough to make a decent living on a small scale vs. mass-production companies that have to sell volume to cover their huge fixed investments in older plants, property, equipment and labor. Did he succeed?

Some people swear by 'em -- some at 'em. They have a mixed reputation for quality in some circles. Hatfield migrated to custom made double shotguns to rival the best English guns at affordable prices and the rifle company was sold at least once that I know of. Pedersoli took over the line themselves with the Frontier, and now also the previously mentioned Cabela Blue Ridge Hunter. Love mine and was so thrilled to have it.

It is a special beauty. Matte black finish on this 39" octagonal barrel. Brass. Double set triggers. And if and when I shoot it to death, I can always buy a replacement lock at Track...
hatfield-flint-rifle-comp-3.jpg  

Last edited by HockaLouis; 03-10-2012 at 02:39 AM.
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Old 03-17-2012, 12:12 AM   #29
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Default Hatfield II

#6 is also a Hatfield, however, it is a percussion cap kit version! It is a NIB browned .50 with casehardened lock too. I'm not 100% sure the full-length stock is maple but it should be. I'll be honest -- I'm a little concerned about finishing it just because the gun itself is something special (again, if only to me).

One of the photo below shows how precisely similar the Pedersoli Frontier is to the Hatfield flint...
hatfield-percussion-rifle-kit-comp-3.jpg   flint-rifle-comparison-4-5-6.jpg  
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Old 03-24-2012, 10:17 PM   #30
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Default Ah, The Good Ole Days

But don't get too excited. Remember when CVA made classic American black powder arms? How many people started with one, maybe finished it themselves, and have continued to use them for the rest of their lives or passed them down!? #7 is a completed but unused-in-box CVA Kentucky Rifle kit. Made in Spain (when they had a respected arms industy -- remember that too?), this is a .45 caplock with a 30" blue octagonal barrel.

The builder did not put the brass plate in between the front and rear sections of the above-average-beauty two-piece hardwood stock (thank goodness -- one has to look for where one nice piece starts and the next begins). Brass furniture and a spare ramrod...

The length of pull, typically short in such type of arms, is a little too short for my long arms (I wear 35" to 37" dress-shirt sleeves) at 12.5" that I feel is better suited to the average sized or shorter man, youth, or lass but I couldn't pass it up.

This is a decent gun and a stalwart of the safe BP shooting sports in America that needed a good home. Well, it is at least a foster child if I don't adopt it...
cva-kentucky-rifle-kit-gun-.jpg   cva-kentucky-rifle-kit-gun-closeup.jpg  

Last edited by HockaLouis; 03-24-2012 at 10:27 PM.
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