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Old 08-01-2009, 02:17 PM   #1
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Greetings!

I just obtained my first two muzzleloaders! The first is a T/C Arms .45 Hawken, but the second is why I'm posting:



This has been in the family for a long time, but no one knows much about it, other than it is old (possibly 5 generations back). Seems to me to measure about .45 cal, but may be a little smaller. I was hoping someone on here might help me ID it, and point me in the right direction to get the hammer mechanism and other parts it is missing (my rookie eye noticed the zip ties aren't original!) Here are some more pics.

Thanks!


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Old 08-01-2009, 04:08 PM   #2
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Since the complete lock is missing, along with the ramrod & other parts, the old gun may just be a wallhanger. It might not be worth fixing up. Check out the bore thoroughly and I'd recommend getting your local gunsmith to check it over before you even think about shooting it.

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Old 08-01-2009, 07:10 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stalkingbear View Post
Since the complete lock is missing, along with the ramrod & other parts, the old gun may just be a wallhanger. It might not be worth fixing up. Check out the bore thoroughly and I'd recommend getting your local gunsmith to check it over before you even think about shooting it.

The lock would have to be hand fitted. Also the tang is missing and would have to be hand fitted. The barrel is held in place with zip ties so the barrel pins are missing. The stock needs massive restoration/repair and is not usable as is. Might be worth it as a family heirloom to have it restored but not for any real value it might have. It's entirely possible it's loaded.
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Old 08-03-2009, 01:26 PM   #4
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thank you both for the help and insight. I did a search on gunbroker, and the only similar looking musket I found, the guy called it a "trade musket". not sure what that means, or how long ago those were made. I will probably wind up completely disassembling the gun, removing the breech plug and giving it a good cleaning. Even though I understand making it a shooter might be out of the question, where or how do I obtain the barrel pins or straps to hold the barrel in properly?

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Old 08-03-2009, 06:12 PM   #5
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I found this somewhat similar musket on gunbroker... I see now how the barrel is held in... anything else?


Pennsylvania Musket Kentucky .....Very Nice Shape! : Antiques / pre-1899 at GunBroker.com

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Old 08-05-2009, 08:02 PM   #6
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I say make a wall hanger out of it. It would cost more to fix than what it is worth.

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Old 08-06-2009, 12:28 PM   #7
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I say make a wall hanger out of it. It would cost more to fix than what it is worth.
Worth implies that it could possibly ever be sold... I have no plans of shooting it, but to make a wall hanger out of it, I'd like it to look like a gun again, and I found a website that sells kits for these guns (pennsylvania/kentucky rifles) for $500 that includes locks, etc, etc. (in Rockford, IL). It's reasonable to have a few hundred in a nice print for your wall, so perhaps spending a few hundred to make it look like a gun again wouldn't be so bad???

Thanks!
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Old 08-17-2009, 08:23 PM   #8
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The style of the stock indicates a late Lancaster County architecture. The drum ignition, double set triggers and shape of the trigger guard also indicate Lancaster building. The straight front trigger suggests it was originally a flint rifle and could have been converted to percussion in the 1830's or later.

The barrel is rifled so it isnt a musket, it is a rifle. Replacement locks are available for these rifles at about $100. Numerous muzzleloadding gunsmiths could almost drop a new one in for you pretty reasonably.

Lancaster County, or Berks County possibly, it is Pennsylvania built. It is missing the breech plug, but the tapered inlet on the breechplug suggests also Lancaster County and possibly a straight barreled Dickert. If it were mine, I would put a breechplug in it and a lock and then hang it on the wall. It is not safe to shoot.

There is a muzzleloading builder near you that could fit those parts for you, and he is reasonable.

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Old 08-17-2009, 09:58 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by W. C. Quantrill View Post
The style of the stock indicates a late Lancaster County architecture. The drum ignition, double set triggers and shape of the trigger guard also indicate Lancaster building. The straight front trigger suggests it was originally a flint rifle and could have been converted to percussion in the 1830's or later.

The barrel is rifled so it isnt a musket, it is a rifle. Replacement locks are available for these rifles at about $100. Numerous muzzleloadding gunsmiths could almost drop a new one in for you pretty reasonably.

Lancaster County, or Berks County possibly, it is Pennsylvania built. It is missing the breech plug, but the tapered inlet on the breechplug suggests also Lancaster County and possibly a straight barreled Dickert. If it were mine, I would put a breechplug in it and a lock and then hang it on the wall. It is not safe to shoot.

There is a muzzleloading builder near you that could fit those parts for you, and he is reasonable.
Very Cool!!! That is some fantastic information! I thank you very much, and I am interested in the muzzleloading builder you've mentioned.

Cheers!
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