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Old 11-27-2012, 05:15 AM   #1
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im looking at a traditions kentucky parts kit percussion rifle. im wondering if its a good gun to start out with? i have some experience with black powder guns like cleaning, taking them down just never shot them before. i like how i could do the stock and put it together.

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Old 11-27-2012, 07:26 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by BWilder View Post
im looking at a traditions kentucky parts kit percussion rifle. im wondering if its a good gun to start out with? i have some experience with black powder guns like cleaning, taking them down just never shot them before. i like how i could do the stock and put it together.
When I was in my teens, my dad brought home an 1861 Colt Navy kit that he picked up at the PX. Some of the best times that we had with each other are from that father son build. I am pretty sure that you will enjoy the build, and it will mean so much more to you when you fire off the first round from that rifle. Take your time, and enjoy the build. Yes, you picked up a good first BP rifle.

The besy way to learn the shooting end of the hobby is to find others in your area who shoot black powder. Since you have exprience with cleaning and take down, you already have a group to shoot with. Listen to them, and read the owner's manual. If you have ant questions, post them here. There are plenty of us here that are willing to help out when it is needed. Welcome to your new addiction!
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Old 11-27-2012, 08:12 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by kfox75

When I was in my teens, my dad brought home an 1861 Colt Navy kit that he picked up at the PX. Some of the best times that we had with each other are from that father son build. I am pretty sure that you will enjoy the build, and it will mean so much more to you when you fire off the first round from that rifle. Take your time, and enjoy the build. Yes, you picked up a good first BP rifle.
i plan on doing it with my dad also, i havent picked it up yet but just wanted to make sure it wasnt a bad gun. i plan on getting the kentucky pistol kit after to have even more fun!
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Old 11-27-2012, 08:31 PM   #4
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I would recommend researching the project before you order the gun. It is a good gun but even a parts kit requires a certain level of skill in order to end up with a decent product. It is a relatively labor intensive project that will require a decent amount of tools,skill and time. Building a bp gun is a labor of love. I've seen a lot of people purchase kits that never get finished.

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Old 11-27-2012, 08:34 PM   #5
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I would recommend researching the project before you order the gun. It is a good gun but even a parts kit requires a certain level of skill in order to end up with a decent product. It is a relatively labor intensive project that will require a decent amount of tools,skill and time. Building a bp gun is a labor of love. I've seen a lot of people purchase kits that never get finished.
whats involved with the kit?
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Old 11-27-2012, 08:35 PM   #6
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Is the barrel already blued? Do you know much about wood work and finishing?

Why the kentucky style? Doesn't seem like the easiest model to build.

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Old 11-27-2012, 08:43 PM   #7
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Is the barrel already blued? Do you know much about wood work and finishing?

Why the kentucky style? Doesn't seem like the easiest model to build.
no the barrel is not blued, but i knew that. i know how to stain wood and finish it. what are some easier kits out there? that was really the first one i saw and liked it
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Old 11-27-2012, 09:28 PM   #8
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I was thinking Dixie had them rated by difficulty...

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"Do you offer any kit guns? How difficult are they to build?
Kit guns offer the muzzleloader the opportunity to participate in the building, customizing and eventually shooting of their own firearm. Dixie currently offers over 60 kit guns including cap and ball revolvers, pistols, Kentucky , Jaeger and Hawken style rifles, military longarms, trade guns and shotguns. We offer kits at the beginner, intermediate and advanced level. Kits in the beginner and intermediate levels are 95% inletted, require minor fitting of metal parts and sanding and finishing of the stock. Intermediate level kits also require polishing and bluing or browning of metal parts. Advanced level kits will also require some stock inletting. Dixie has all of the tools and materials you would need to complete any kit or to build a muzzleloader from scratch."
http://www.dixiegunworks.com/default.php?cPath=22_162_192 I think you would have to call them to find which kit is for a beginner and which is more difficult.

Traditions probably would offer similar advice, if you call them. I would think something like a Hawken-type would be easier, but you should ask them.
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Old 11-27-2012, 10:28 PM   #9
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It can be a fun project. It does not require any special tools. It can turn out really well even for beginners. The main thing is to take-your-time. Don't try to get it done in a weekend or something like that. If you decide to go for it remember slow and sure is best. Include us in the project too - take pictures and report progress along the way. Many of us on this forum have done these projects.

I see Academy Sports had them for $239

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Old 11-27-2012, 10:51 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by hiwall
It can be a fun project. It does not require any special tools. It can turn out really well even for beginners. The main thing is to take-your-time. Don't try to get it done in a weekend or something like that. If you decide to go for it remember slow and sure is best. Include us in the project too - take pictures and report progress along the way. Many of us on this forum have done these projects.

I see Academy Sports had them for $239
i think that the hardest part is going to be the metal. im looking at the "birchwood casey plum brown barrel finish". do you think that would be decent for it?
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