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-   -   Kentucky Long Rifle (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f22/kentucky-long-rifle-7993/)

Crispy129 10-26-2008 03:24 PM

Kentucky Long Rifle
 
I don't have much, if any experience with black powder rifles, but I really like the Kentucky Long Rifle, and wouldn't mind having one around later on. I'm not looking at an antique that isn't meant to be fired or one that is overly expensive until a good bit later on. I'd mainly be looking for one to shoot around at the range. What price range would I be looking at for something like that? Where is a good place to look to find one at a reasonable price?

-Crispy

c3shooter 10-27-2008 05:49 PM

Well, FWIW, a lot of the "Kentucky" rifles were actually made in Pennsylvania! If you are looking for a muzzleloader that does not have all the latest Gee Whiz In line 209 primer etc etc etc, but shoots very well, and will not put you in the pporhouse, check around on the auction sites (auctionarms.com, gunbroker.com) for a Thompson-Center (TC) Hawken- possibly a Renegade. These are honest wood and blued steel, most are #11 percussion cap, altho there are a few flintlocks out there, double set triggers, usually 50 cal or larger, and as accurate as you are. Have seen several of these in VG shape for $200 or less. An ORIGINAL long rifle is gonna cost you a LOT more.

Slickrick214 10-28-2008 03:47 PM

The longrifle developed on the American frontier in the period beginning in the 1740s, and continued its development technically and artistically until it passed out of fashion in the mid to late 19th century. It is accepted that the longrifle was the product of German gunsmiths who immigrated to new settlements in Pennsylvania and Virginia as early as the 1740s. Initially the weapon of choice on the frontier was the smooth bore musket or trade gun, built in the thousands in factories in England and France and shipped to the Colonies for purchase. But gradually a group of solitary frontiersmen, Indian fighters, and professional market hunters began using more and more rifles due to their longer effective range. While the smooth bore musket had an effective range of less than 100 yards, a good rifleman could hit a man size target out to three hundred yards or more. There was a price for this accuracy, however. The long rifle required a full minute to load, far longer than a musket's twenty seconds.
A Kentucky repro isn't going to be cheap. For an average to above avarage repro made by big name companies like Armi Chippara and Perdosoli you'll be looking at 550-650+ dollars. For something custom expect to pay a decent amount more. If you want to be cheap you can get one of those made in India/Pakistan repro's but don't complain when it blows up on you.:D

Crispy129 10-28-2008 08:31 PM

Yeah I'm not looking for an originial or anything right now. I remember reading somewhere that a lot of them were built in PA a long time ago. I was just toying with the idea of maybe getting one for shooting around on the range every now and then. Right now I may be springing for a FiveseveN because it doesn't look good for McCain and the congress right now. That will eat up what I was planning on spending and maybe a little more. When more paychecks start coming in, one of these is definitely near the top of my list though.

Slickrick214 10-28-2008 11:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crispy129 (Post 47490)
Yeah I'm not looking for an originial or anything right now. I remember reading somewhere that a lot of them were built in PA a long time ago. I was just toying with the idea of maybe getting one for shooting around on the range every now and then. Right now I may be springing for a FiveseveN because it doesn't look good for McCain and the congress right now. That will eat up what I was planning on spending and maybe a little more. When more paychecks start coming in, one of these is definitely near the top of my list though.

Those prices are for re-makes of the orginial and the minimum will probably be about 550 dollars new. For an orginial your probably looking at over 1000 dollars.

Bob Wright 10-29-2008 03:03 PM

I would suggest that prior to doing anything else, buy Dixie Gun Works catalog. Turner Kirkland wrote the book long before re-enactors became popular, and even after his death, Dixie Gun Works is the Mecca of blackpowder shooters.

True Kentucky rifles, as well as the Tennesse rifle, are a lot of fun to those whose interests lean that way. (Mine don't) And muzzle loaders remained in use in many areas into the years following WW I. My late hunting companion used a .38 H&R muzzle loader in restaurant hunting up until around 1941.

Bob Wright

Bob Wright 10-29-2008 03:06 PM

And, I'm reminded of a story:

My late cousin, by marriage, went to an auction and observed a cap-lock rifle in the inventory. When it came up on the block, no one bid on the thing, so he bid "a quarter." He brought it home for twenty-five cents.

We fashioned the patch-box cover from a brass door push plate.

Bob Wright

Ed21 11-07-2008 08:14 PM

Check out Track of the Wolf

http://www.trackofthewolf.com/(S(02pdo4551ett1145pkikm42y))/categories/catList.aspx?catID=12

Joe M 11-12-2008 11:42 AM

Track of the Wolf is a good place to start. I would also recommend checking
into building your own from a kit from TOTW. Actually, if you for go all the bells and whistles not needed on a longrifle, you can build one for a pretty reasonable price.

I've built many over the years. It's a great hobby to get in to.


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