Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > Long Guns > .22 Rifle/Rimfire Discussion > What .22lr firearms should I avoid?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-03-2012, 08:09 PM   #291
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Carson, CA,California
Posts: 132
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

One further comment about .22 rifles. Get you hands on a Winchester 9422 or Marlin 39A .22 lever gun. put them next to a Henry .22 rifle. Shoot them and disassemble them, look at how they are manufactured. Then see what you think of the Henry.

Of course there are some people that are so unable to discern quality, that they will argue until the cows come home.

For that matter, show me any .22 bolt action rifle, by any American manufacturer, that is as good quality wise as my Winchester 52 sporter.

I'm not trying to beat up on anyone, all I want to do is teach quality and what it looks, and feels like.

The guns I have mentioned have cost me a lot of money. I'm not rich. And, to have a quality firearms, I have sometimes went without some things I needed and saved for a long time, to acquire the quality pieces that I now have.

Bill

__________________

Last edited by Stillwater; 06-03-2012 at 08:12 PM.
Stillwater is offline  
big shrek Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2012, 04:37 PM   #292
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Pasco Cty.FL
Posts: 6,465
Liked 2413 Times on 1374 Posts
Likes Given: 1895

Default

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Point well taken, Stillwater. But for shooting to be

affordable, some folks are going to just settle for

the Henry levers, and the Marlin 60s.

To be fair, these are the clay with which many

shooters are started.


Should we have half as many people shooting today, because they

didn't want to spend 500$ or more on a .22LR rifle?

IMHO, this thread was started to alert people to the real

stinkerino 22s, not simply the ones of an arguably less, and

humbler, quality than the top end products. Admittedly the

top end rifles are very good.

But I think we're trying to cull the worst of the worst here...

__________________
therewolf is offline  
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2012, 05:30 PM   #293
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 251
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 8

Default

Quote:
Of course there are some people that are so unable to discern quality
The level quality is relative to the price paid. A sensible person would not expect a $200 rifle to look, feel and shoot like one costing $600 or more. I don't expect my rimfire rifles to compete with the fit and finish of my centerfire pistols and rifles costing 3, 4 and 5 times the price. To suggest I can't recognize the difference between high quality and budget quality firearms is a weak attempt at an insult.

The Henry line may not live up to your ridiculous standards but they're much better than you would have others believe.

Quote:
I'm not trying to beat up on anyone, all I want to do is teach quality and what it looks, and feels like.
You're not trying to teach anything, you're trying to instill your fear of cast parts and paint into others. As I said before, you expect too much from reasonably priced rimfire rifles. To compete in the budget priced rifle market Henry, Marlin, Ruger and the rest have to cut production costs. Cast and/or MIM parts are cheaper and faster to produce than machining and do not sacrifice functionality or reliability. The same can be said for the birch and synthetic stocks, not as nice as the Walnut but certainly get the job done. You get a good service quality rifle at an affordable price.
__________________
MidnightExpress is offline  
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2012, 06:39 PM   #294
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
dan01's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 132
Liked 18 Times on 17 Posts
Likes Given: 24

Default

MdnightExpress, I agree with you 100%

Dan

__________________
dan01 is offline  
MidnightExpress Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2012, 12:27 PM   #295
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 44
Default

The level of quality might be related to the price paid, but for rifles costing a similar amount, Henry seems (in my opinion) lower than the competition. Savage and Ruger have low-cost .22's that are reasonably higher quality, well built firearms. Just compare Henry Survival Rifle at $225 to the Ruger 10/22 at $200. You'd be paying more for the Henry, and I can tell you first hand that there's nothing on the Henry that is worth more, only less.

Also, to whomever thinks it's "operator error", you can't be serious. Despite the fact that I am familiar with many types of rifles, the .22LR is the simplest of them all. Load it, charge it, pull the trigger. It should be that simple, but apparently you need some kind of degree to know how to operate a Henry survival rifle. It's funny I've had guns that were soaking in cosmoline for 40 years that fired the first time and every time thereafter.

__________________

Last edited by meal4zombies; 06-05-2012 at 12:59 PM.
meal4zombies is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2012, 05:57 PM   #296
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Temple,Texas
Posts: 146
Liked 19 Times on 15 Posts
Likes Given: 10

Default

I have noticed that this thread has drifted into the 22 rifles discussion and neglected the pistols. the OP asked which 22 firearms to avoid.

but for me... there are three types of manufacturers, the high-end, the average commercial , and the cut-rate ones. the mojority of responses seem to have been on one or two particular models of the average commerically manufactured weapons being deficient.

IMHO, while I would buy a remington, ruger, browning based on reputation, i would not blindly purchase a weapon from a complany who's name that i did not recognize. i would handle the weapon, and definitely test fire it, then ask to field strip, clean and reassemble.

what are some of the cut-rate 22 manufacturers that should one should be careful about their product- no need to mention a specific model?

Curlyjoe

__________________

Last edited by Curlyjoe_99; 06-05-2012 at 05:58 PM. Reason: typo's
Curlyjoe_99 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2012, 11:21 PM   #297
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 205
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Even the low cost gun manufacturers turn out a decent product. No a RG pistol is no where near the quality of a Ruger or Colt they still function fine. I paid $30 for mine, if I lose it in the river im not out a lot if money.

__________________
Zodiac131911 is offline  
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2012, 04:34 AM   #298
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 251
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 8

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by meal4zombies View Post
Also, to whomever thinks it's "operator error",
That was me, user names are in the upper left corner of the posts. Or you can just quote (button in lower right corner) the post in question and it will give due credit to the author in your reply without you having to remember anything.

...and it wasn't a thought, it's a fact.

I've seen more "junk" or "POS" 22's that were damaged or rendered inoperable by their owners than those that had actual factory defects. It's not uncommon for some gun owners to neglect, misuse and abuse the budget priced rifles they own. They're inexpensive and easy to replace so they tend to not give them much thought or care and even loan them out to others who care less than the owner. Inexperience of the owner or operator will also get a rifle labeled as junk.

For example, at my local range a few years ago, the man next to me was complaining (loudly) about his new, but lightly used "22". It was a bolt action that would misfire more than it would fire, it would extract and eject even less. I asked if I could take a look at for him since I've been working on firearms for a while, it might save him the cost of going to a gunsmith. I look at this POS as he described it, and it indeed looked practically new. No obvious defects or missing parts and the bolt was smooth a silk. Took a quick look at the roll stamps and serial number to get a little more information and a date of manufacture.

After this quick assessment I ask my friend on the other side of my table if he still had some CCI left, he said sure and handed me 12-15 rounds. I load up the POS magazine with seven rounds and insert the mag. I fire, extract and eject all seven without a single problem. The look on the owners face was a combination of puzzled, surprised and happy. He asked what I did, I said: "just used the right ammo". He said: "Federal was supposed to be good stuff."

I told him it is, but not too many 22-Magnum rifles will shoot 22 long rifle ammo reliably. Seems his POS was just fine now.

I read a post some time back on another forum about a pistol that was supposedly junk. Firing pin and spring broke before its first range trip, clearly a case of factory defect and cheap parts. It certainly had nothing to do with several days of dry firing without a snap cap. The owner informed everyone of the dry firing when asked.

Even you should agree these are user errors. I've seen others that were never cleaned, some that were cleaned and had parts and pieces bent or knocked out of place in the process and still others that were modified by the owner to the point they would not function.

Quote:
It's funny I've ha.....
No, what's funny is you read one general statement regarding general complaints of rimfire rifles and decided to take personal offense.

Simply put, yes I was serious as you can see from the information above. If you took offense at "owner/operator error" that's your own fault, there was another comment just before it you seem to be disregarding. You should read it, you might like it better.
__________________
MidnightExpress is offline  
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2012, 05:10 AM   #299
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 251
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 8

Default

Your price comparison is interesting. I use Bud's Gun Shop to compare prices on rifles, their prices are usually within 5-15% of my local Wal-Mart depending on model and which one might be running something on sale. I found a Henry Survival for $202 shipped and another for $225, same site has a Ruger takedown for $349 shipped. Bud's lists the non-takedown Ruger 10/22 with a wood or synthetic stock at $211 (not $200) and the last time I checked my local Wal-Mart, the Ruger 10/22 they had on display was $243. I can't seem to find the Ruger TakeDown rifle for less than $350, even if I could find one for less I doubt it would be close to $200.

Bud's also lists the Marlin 70PSS for $276, closer to the Ruger Takedown than the Henry with its stainless barrel and it's $74 less than the Ruger.

If you want to compare non-takedown rifles you'll have to wait for Henry to make one to see what it will cost.

As for how Ruger sells their 10/22 for a whopping $14 less than the Henry Survival Rifle. Obviously production/machining to facilitate the removable barrel cost more as evident by the increase in the Ruger Takedown and Marlin 70PSS prices compared to their non-takedown counterparts. The 10/22 you found for $200 is not a takedown rifle. If Ruger were to price their takedown 10/22 below that of the 70PSS and Henry Survival it would be because they chose to take a loss or make very little on the sales of this particular weapon. That would fall into the category of Competitive Pricing.

__________________
MidnightExpress is offline  
dan01 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2012, 03:01 PM   #300
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
big shrek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: NW Florida
Posts: 1,310
Liked 72 Times on 66 Posts
Likes Given: 539

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MidnightExpress View Post
The level quality is relative to the price paid. A sensible person would not expect a $200 rifle to look, feel and shoot like one costing $600 or more.
Actually, it drives people at the range NUTS that I can take an $85 pawn shop Marlin 25MN
and win Black Death challenges with it over their $1500+ custom 1022's & Krico's

$10 worth of acraglass and a few cents of polishing compound on the bolt & trigger to smooth 'em...all I needed to make Marlin Converts at ERML

Its why the Marlin X-7 series of rifles, while made inexpensively, due to their button-rifled barrels, adjustable Pro-fire triggers
& factory pillar-bedded stocks, shoot like Much More Expensive rifles...

Now the final fit & finish comes from DIY'ing it...but for us Shade-tree Mechanic types...we like doing that final custom tweaking ourselves
and saving $500+ while we're at it
Kind of like the folks that take a perfectly capable 2010 Mustang and slapping in a Speed Chip & a K&N Cold Air Intake...
we want MORE than the MFR offers...even though what they offer is pretty darn good to begin with...
tweaking 'em up for 10-15% more power just makes the ownership more personal & enjoyable!
__________________

Calico Specialist
Marlin Specialist
I'm not just Trigger Happy, I'm Trigger Ecstatic!!

big shrek is offline  
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Firearms Forum Replies Last Post
Places to Avoid while Carrying? ElmerDuff Concealed Carrying & Personal Protection 46 10-27-2012 07:12 PM
I dislike the Trigger on the Glock what other pistols should I avoid. SirIsaacNewton Semi-Auto Handguns 11 12-28-2011 01:59 AM
Warning: Avoid "OutdoorSuperStore.com" Zappa The Club House 10 02-23-2009 12:34 AM
What to look for (or avoid) when shopping for used gun. flyingbrickracing General Rifle Discussion 6 02-09-2009 08:16 PM
Evanston Votes To Amend Gun Ban—Tries To Avoid NRA Lawsuit tracker Politics, Religion and Controversy 4 07-21-2008 02:45 AM